2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the 10 U.S. Representatives from the state of Washington, one from each of the state's 10 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 10 Washington seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 7 3
Seats won 7 3
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 2,340,356 1,545,436
Percentage 59.34% 39.18%
Swing Decrease 3.16% Increase 4.48%

Washington Congressional Election Results 2020.svg

District 1Edit

The 1st congressional district spans the northeastern Seattle suburbs, including Redmond and Kirkland, along the Cascades to the Canada–US border. The incumbent is Democrat Suzan DelBene, was re-elected with 59.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
  • Jeffrey Beeler Sr. (Republican), Sultan city councilman and candidate for Washington's 1st congressional district in 2018[2]
  • Derek Chartrand (Republican), sales executive[2]
  • Suzan DelBene (Democratic), incumbent U.S Representative
  • Matthew Heines (Independent), educator[2]
  • Robert Mair (Independent), candidate for Washington's 1st congressional district in 2018[2]
  • Steve Skelton (Libertarian), office manager[2]
  • Justin Smoak (Independent), mining engineer[2]

Primary resultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzan DelBene (incumbent) 147,666 55.4
Republican Jeffrey Beeler Sr. 85,655 32.1
Republican Derek Chartrand 15,777 5.9
No party preference Justin Smoak 7,701 2.9
Libertarian Steven Skelton 7,286 2.7
No party preference Matthew Heines 1,335 0.5
No party preference Robert Dean Mair 812 0.3
Write-in 340 0.1
Total votes 266,572 100.0

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Safe D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe D October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Safe D November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Safe D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe D November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Safe D November 2, 2020

ResultsEdit

Washington's 1st congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzan DelBene (incumbent) 249,944 58.6
Republican Jeffrey Beeler 176,407 41.3
Write-in 511 0.1
Total votes 426,862 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2Edit

The 2nd congressional district encompasses the northern Puget Sound area, including Everett and Bellingham. The incumbent is Democrat Rick Larsen, who was re-elected with 71.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
  • Jason Call (Democratic), progressive activist[11]
  • James Golder (Republican), former Idaho state representative (1977–1985)[11]
  • Cody Hart (Republican), U.S. Navy veteran[11]
  • Timothy Hazelo (Republican), U.S. Navy veteran[11]
  • Kari Ilonummi (Republican), blogger[11]
  • Carrie Kennedy (Republican), activist[11]
  • Rick Larsen (Democratic), incumbent U.S Representative
  • Tim Uy (Republican), volunteer firefighter[11]

EndorsementsEdit

Jason Call (D)
Organizations

Primary resultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Larsen (incumbent) 120,694 48.5
Republican Timothy S. Hazelo 37,104 14.9
Democratic Jason Call 34,537 13.9
Trump Republican Tim Uy 24,613 9.9
Republican Cody Hart 14,225 5.7
Republican Carrie R. Kennedy 9,096 3.6
Republican James Dean Golder 5,343 2.1
Republican Kari Ilonummi 2,889 1.2
Write-in 284 0.1
Total votes 248,788 100.0

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Safe D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe D October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Safe D November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Safe D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe D November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Safe D November 2, 2020

ResultsEdit

Washington's 2nd congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Larsen (incumbent) 255,252 63.1
Republican Timothy Hazelo 148,384 36.7
Write-in 962 0.2
Total votes 404,598 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3Edit

The 3rd district encompasses the southernmost portion of western and central Washington. It includes the counties of Lewis, Pacific, Wahkiakum, Cowlitz, Clark, Skamania, and Klickitat, as well as a small sliver of southern Thurston county. The incumbent is Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler, who was re-elected with 52.7% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
WithdrawnEdit
  • Peter Khalil (Democratic), legal mediator[20]

EndorsementsEdit

Jaime Herrera Beutler (R)
Organizations
Peter Khalil (D)
Carolyn Long (D)

Primary resultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler (incumbent) 135,726 56.2
Democratic Carolyn Long 95,875 39.7
No party preference Martin D. Hash 3,904 1.6
Democratic Davy Ray 3,522 1.5
Democratic Devin C. Gray 1,969 0.8
Write-in 343 0.1
Total votes 241,339 100.0

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Lean R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Lean R October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Lean R November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Lean R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Lean R November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Lean R November 2, 2020

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Jaime Herrera
Beutler (R)
Carolyn
Long (D)
Undecided
DCCC Targeting & Analytics (D)[A] October 19–20, 2020 425 (LV) ±  4.9% 49% 47% 4%
GQR Research (D)[B] September 24–26, 2020 400 (LV) ±  4.9% 49% 47% 4%
RMG Research July 20–August 4, 2020 500 (RV) ±  4.5% 44% 40% 16%

ResultsEdit

Washington's 3rd congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler (incumbent) 235,579 56.4
Democratic Carolyn Long 181,347 43.4
Write-in 977 0.2
Total votes 417,903 100.0
Republican hold

District 4Edit

The 4th congressional district encompasses rural central Washington, including Yakima and Tri-Cities area. The incumbent is Republican Dan Newhouse, was re-elected with 62.8% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

  • Ryan Cooper (Libertarian), Libertarian candidate for Washington State Senate in 2018[25]
  • Evan Jones (Independent), community activist[26]
  • Doug McKinley (Democratic), attorney[25]
  • Dan Newhouse (Republican), incumbent U.S. Representative
  • Sarena Sloot (Republican), nurse practitioner[26]
  • Tracy Wright (Republican), computer programmer[25]

Primary resultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Newhouse (incumbent) 101,539 57.4
Democratic Douglas E. McKinley 46,471 26.2
Republican Sarena Sloot 11,823 6.7
Republican Tracy Wright 9,088 5.1
Libertarian Ryan Cooper 4,080 2.3
Independent Evan Jones 3,816 2.2
Write-in 228 0.1
Total votes 177,045 100

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Safe R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe R October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Safe R November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Safe R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe R November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Safe R November 2, 2020

ResultsEdit

Washington's 4th congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Newhouse (incumbent) 202,108 66.2
Democratic Douglas McKinley 102,667 33.6
Write-in 488 0.2
Total votes 305,263 100.0
Republican hold

District 5Edit

The 5th district encompasses eastern Washington, and includes the city of Spokane. The incumbent is Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers, who was re-elected with 54.8% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
  • Stephen Major (Republican), former mortgage broker[27]
  • Cathy McMorris Rodgers (Republican), incumbent U.S. Representative[28]
  • Brendan O'Regan (Independent)[29]
  • Dave Wilson (Democratic), community activist[29]
WithdrawnEdit
  • Chris Armitage (Democratic), comedian and U.S. Air Force veteran[30](remained on ballot)
  • Rob Chase (Republican)[31]

EndorsementsEdit

Chris Armitage (D)
U.S. Representatives
Organizations
Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R)
Federal officials
Organizations

ResultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers (incumbent) 122,744 52.7
Democratic Dave Wilson 56,492 24.3
Democratic Christopher Armitage (withdrawn) 28,180 12.1
Republican Stephen T. Major 20,000 8.6
Independent Brendan O'Regan 4,995 2.1
Write-in 385 0.2
Total votes 232,796 100.0

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Safe R November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe R October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Safe R November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Likely R November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe R November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Safe R November 2, 2020

ResultsEdit

Washington's 5th congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers (incumbent) 247,815 61.3
Democratic Dave Wilson 155,737 38.5
Write-in 808 0.2
Total votes 404,360 100.0
Republican hold

District 6Edit

The 6th district is based on the Olympic Peninsula, and includes western Tacoma. The incumbent is Democrat Derek Kilmer, who was re-elected with 63.9% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
  • Johny Alberg (Republican)[35]
  • Stephen Brodhead (Republican), businessman[35]
  • Derek Kilmer (Democratic), incumbent U.S. Representative
  • Elizabeth Kreiselmaier (Republican), psychologist[35]
  • Rebecca Parson (Democratic), Tacoma Area Commission on Disabilities commissioner[36]
  • Chris Welton (Republican), records technician[35]

WithdrewEdit

EndorsementsEdit

ResultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Derek Kilmer (incumbent) 125,019 47.3
Republican Elizabeth Kreiselmaier 71,601 27.1
Democratic Rebecca Parson 35,631 13.5
Republican Chris Welton 14,795 5.6
Republican Stephan Brodhead 9,761 3.7
Republican Johny Alberg 7,178 2.7
Write-in 338 0.1
Total votes 264,323 100.0

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Safe D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe D October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Safe D November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Safe D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe D November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Safe D November 2, 2020

ResultsEdit

Washington's 6th congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Derek Kilmer (incumbent) 247,429 59.3
Republican Elizabeth Kreiselmaier 168,783 40.5
Write-in 1,004 0.2
Total votes 417,216 100.0
Democratic hold

District 7Edit

The 7th congressional district encompasses most of Seattle, as well Edmonds, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Vashon Island, and Burien. The incumbent is Democrat Pramila Jayapal, who was reelected with 83.6% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
  • Jack Hughes-Hageman (Democratic)[42]
  • Pramila Jayapal (Democratic) incumbent U.S Representative
  • Craig Keller (Republican)[42]
  • Rick Lewis (Independent)[42]
  • Scott Sutherland (Republican)[42]

Primary resultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pramila Jayapal (incumbent) 240,801 80.0
Republican Craig Keller 24,477 8.1
Independent Rick Lewis 13,885 4.6
Republican Scott Sutherland 11,332 3.8
Democratic Jack Hughes-Hageman 10,052 3.3
Write-in 537 0.2
Total votes 301,084 100.0

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Safe D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe D October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Safe D November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Safe D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe D November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Safe D November 2, 2020

ResultsEdit

Washington's 7th congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pramila Jayapal (incumbent) 387,109 83.0
Republican Craig Keller 78,240 16.8
Write-in 1,113 0.2
Total votes 466,462 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8Edit

The 8th district encompasses the eastern suburbs of Seattle including Sammamish, Maple Valley, Covington, Hobart, Issaquah, and Auburn and stretches into rural central Washington, including Chelan County and Kittitas County, as well as taking in eastern Pierce County. The incumbent is Democrat Kim Schrier, who flipped the district and was elected with 52.4% of the vote.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
DeclinedEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kim Schrier (incumbent) 106,611 43.3
Republican Jesse Jensen 49,368 20.0
Republican Keith R. Swank 42,809 17.4
Trump Republican Party Dean Saulibio 28,976 11.8
Independent Corey Bailey 6,552 2.7
Democratic James Mitchell 6,187 2.5
Democratic Keith Arnold 4,111 1.7
No party preference Ryan Dean Burkett 1,458 0.6
Write-in 289 0.1
Total votes 246,361 100.0

EndorsementsEdit

Jesse Jensen (R)
U.S. Representatives
Organizations
Kim Schrier (D)
U.S. Presidents
  • Barack Obama, 44th President of the United States (2009-2017), U.S. Senator from Illinois (2005-2008)[48]
U.S. Vice Presidents
  • Joe Biden, 47th Vice President of the United States (2009-2017), U.S. Senator from Delaware (1973-2009), 2020 Presidential nominee[48]
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State and local officials
Organizations
Newspapers

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Likely D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe D October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Lean D November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Likely D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe D November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Lean D November 2, 2020

ResultsEdit

Washington's 8th congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kim Schrier (incumbent) 213,123 51.7
Republican Jesse Jensen 198,423 48.2
Write-in 566 0.1
Total votes 412,112 100.0
Democratic hold

District 9Edit

The 9th congressional district stretches from small parts of northeastern Tacoma up to southeastern Seattle, taking in the surrounding suburbs, including Federal Way, Des Moines, Kent, SeaTac, Renton, Mercer Island, and Bellevue. The incumbent is Democrat Adam Smith, who was re-elected with 67.9% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
  • Doug Basler (Republican)[42]
  • Jorge Besada (Libertarian)[42]
  • Joshua Campbell (Republican)[42]
  • Adam Smith (Democratic), incumbent U.S. Representative

ResultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adam Smith (incumbent) 145,601 73.6
Republican Doug Basler 30,923 15.6
Republican Joshua Campbell 15,983 8.1
Libertarian Jorge Besada 4,792 2.4
Write-in 560 0.3
Total votes 197,859 100.0

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Safe D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe D October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Safe D November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Safe D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe D November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Safe D November 2, 2020

ResultsEdit

Washington's 9th congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adam Smith (incumbent) 258,771 74.1
Republican Doug Basler 89,697 25.7
Write-in 582 0.2
Total votes 349,050 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10Edit

The 10th district includes Olympia and the Tacoma suburbs, including Puyallup, Lakewood, and University Place. The incumbent is Democrat Denny Heck, who was re-elected with 61.5% of the vote in 2018.[1] On December 4, 2019, Heck announced that he will retire from Congress and not seek re-election.[54]

Primary electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

DeclaredEdit
  • Mary Bacon (Democratic), environmental scientist and U.S. Army veteran[55]
  • Randy Bell (Democratic)[55]
  • Richard Boyce (Congress Sucks), Independent candidate for Washington's 10th congressional district in 2016[55]
  • Todd Buckley (Independent), data analyst[55]
  • Joshua Collins (Essential Workers), truck driver[56]
  • Beth Doglio (Democratic), state representative[57]
  • Phil Gardner (Democratic), former district director for U.S. Representative Denny Heck[58]
  • Don Hewett (Republican), executive engineer[57]
  • Rian Ingrim (Republican), businessman and U.S. Army Veteran[57]
  • Dean Johnson (Republican), Puyallup city councilman[59]
  • Ralph Johnson (Republican)[55]
  • Eric LeMay (Democratic), businessman[55]
  • Jackson Maynard (Republican), attorney[55]
  • Gordon Press (Republican)[55]
  • Kristine Reeves (Democratic), former state representative[60]
  • Nancy Dailey Slotnick (Republican), businesswoman and U.S. Army veteran[55]
  • Marilyn Strickland (Democratic), CEO of the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce and former mayor of Tacoma[61]
  • Ryan Tate (Republican), software engineer[57]
  • Sam Wright (Democratic)[55]
DeclinedEdit

EndorsementsEdit

Joshua Collins
Beth Doglio[66]
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Individuals
Organizations
Kristine Reeves[75]
Federal officeholders
Marilyn Strickland[77]

Primary resultsEdit

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marilyn Strickland 45,988 20.4
Democratic Beth Doglio 34,254 15.2
Democratic Kristine Reeves 29,236 12.9
Republican Rian Ingrim 25,688 11.4
Republican Jackson Maynard 18,526 8.2
Republican Dean Johnson 16,700 7.4
Republican Nancy Dailey Slotnick 15,201 6.7
Republican Don Hewett 10,750 4.8
Democratic Phil Gardner 5,292 2.3
Republican Ryan Tate 4,196 1.9
Democratic Mary Bacon 3,992 1.8
Independent Todd Buckley 3,552 1.6
Democratic Eric LeMay 3,072 1.4
Essential Workers Joshua Collins 2,667 1.2
Congress Sucks Richard Boyce 2,302 1.0
Republican Ralph Johnson 1,441 0.6
Republican Gordon Allen Pross 1,186 0.5
Democratic Sam Wright 1,129 0.5
Democratic Randolph Bell 563 0.2
Write-in 267 0.1
Total votes 226,002 100.0

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[4] Safe D November 2, 2020
Inside Elections[5] Safe D October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[6] Safe D November 2, 2020
Politico[7] Safe D November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[8] Safe D November 2, 2020
RCP[9] Safe D November 2, 2020

PollingEdit

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Marilyn
Strickland (D)
Beth
Doglio (D)
Undecided
GQR Research[b] August 24–28, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 43% 22% 35%

ResultsEdit

Washington's 10th congressional district, 2020[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Marilyn Strickland 167,937 49.3
Democratic Beth Doglio 121,040 35.6
Write-in 51,430 15.1
Total votes 340,407 100.0
Democratic hold

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  2. ^ Poll sponsored by Strickland's campaign
Partisan clients
  1. ^ The DCCC endorsed Long prior to the sampling period.
  2. ^ Poll conducted for the Long campaign.

ReferencesEdit

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  2. ^ a b c d e f "See who filed to run in the August primary". The Northern Light. May 20, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "August 4, 2020 Primary Results". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "2020 House Race Ratings for November 2, 2020". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "2020 House Ratings". House Ratings. The Rothenberg Political Report. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
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  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "2020 Election Forecast". Politico. April 5, 2021.
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  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Battle for House 2020". RCP. Retrieved April 5, 2021.
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  12. ^ Sittenfeld, Tiernan (July 9, 2020). "LCV Action Fund Endorses Rick Larsen for Re-Election". League of Conservation Voters. LCV Action Fund.
  13. ^ a b "2020 Endorsements". plannedparenthoodaction.org. Planned Parenthood Action Fund.
  14. ^ a b c d e "Sierra Club #ClimateVoter Guide: Endorsements". Sierra Club.
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  18. ^ Hair, Calley (May 12, 2020). "Martin Hash files to run as independent for 3rd Congressional District". The Columbian.
  19. ^ Hair, Calley (July 8, 2019). "Carolyn Long launches second bid for Congress". The Columbian. Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  20. ^ Hair, Calley (April 2, 2019). "Democrat Peter Khalil to challenge Herrera Beutler for 3rd District seat". The Columbian. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  21. ^ a b "2020 Candidates". maggieslist.org.
  22. ^ "Peter Khalil". October 25, 2019.
  23. ^ "Carolyn Long".
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  26. ^ a b "Pasco Democrat jumps in race to challenge WA state Senate leader". Tri-City Herald. May 16, 2020.
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  58. ^ "Phil Gardner, former aide to Denny Heck, joins race to replace Heck in Congress". The Seattle Times. January 1, 2020. Retrieved January 15, 2020.
  59. ^ Peterson, Josephine (May 18, 2020). "Three Puyallup City Council members file for state, federal offices". The News Tribune. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
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  61. ^ Gutman, David (December 19, 2019). "Marilyn Strickland, Seattle Chamber CEO and ex-Tacoma mayor, running for Congress". The Seattle Times. Retrieved December 19, 2019.
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  63. ^ Heck, Denny (December 4, 2019). "It has been an honor to serve you". Medium. Retrieved December 4, 2019.
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  66. ^ "Endorsements". Beth Doglio for Congress.
  67. ^ "Bernie Sanders Endorses Beth Doglio for Congress".
  68. ^ "Rep. Pramila Jayapal Endorses Beth Doglio for Congress".
  69. ^ "Doglio Raises over $332,000 in Q2 with more than 7,000 donations".
  70. ^ "Congressional Progressive Caucus PAC Endorses Beth Doglio (WA-10) for Congress".
  71. ^ Jamaal Bowman [@JamaalBowmanNY] (September 25, 2020). ".@BethDoglio is a community organizer, climate activist, and current State Representative who understands that we can't accept the status quo. In Congress, Beth will fight for affordable housing, Medicare for All, paid family leave, and a Green New Deal. We need Beth in WA-10!" (Tweet). Retrieved September 25, 2020 – via Twitter.
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  73. ^ "LGBTQ Victory Fund Endorses Will Cunningham, Beth Doglio & Alex Morse for U.S. Congress". LGBTQ Victory Fund. July 6, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
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  75. ^ "Endorsements". Kristine Reeves for Congress. Retrieved July 16, 2020.
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  77. ^ "Endorsements". Marilyn Strickland for Congress. Retrieved July 16, 2020.

External linksEdit

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 2nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 3rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 4th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 5th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 6th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 7th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 8th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 9th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 10th district candidates