2019 World Surf League

The 2019 World Surf League was the competition series hosted by the World Surf League, the global championship body for competitive surfing. The 2019 World Surf League consisted of the Championship Tour (shortboard tour), the Qualifying Series (shortboard and longboard), Big Wave Tour, Longboard Tour, Junior Tour, and other specialty tours and events such as the Vans Triple Crown.[1]

2019 World Surf League
JBay Open - 007.jpg
LocationAustralia, Indonesia, Brazil, South Africa, French Polynesia, The United States of America, France, Portugal
DatesApril 3- December 20
← 2018

The Annual World Surf League Champion Tour is a professional shortboarding surf tour run by the World Surf League (WSL), formerly known as the Association of Surfing Professionals (ASP) prior to 2014.[2]

The Championship tour is divided by gender into the Men’s and Women’s championship series. The 2019 tour consisted of 11 Men’s events and 10 Women’s events. The placings from each event for each competitor are used to determine, at the conclusion of the tour, the overall female and male champions for 2019, referred to by the league as World Champions.

The 2019 tour began in April and ended in December, travelling to the global locations of Australia, Indonesia, Brazil, South Africa, America, France, Portugal, Hawaii and Tahiti.[3]In 2019 the female world champion was Carissa Moore,[4] from Hawaii, and the male world champion was Italo Ferreira, from Brazil.[5]

2019 Men's Championship TourEdit

Quicksilver ProEdit

The Quicksilver Pro 2019 was held in the Gold Coast, Queensland at Coolangatta. The male competition was won by Brazilian surfer Italo Ferreria (Brazil), who beat competitor Kolohe Andino (USA) by 0.14ths.[6]

Rip Curl ProEdit

The Rip Curl Pro was held at Bells Beach in Victoria, Australia from the 17-27 April. It was won by John John Florence (Hawaii), defeating Filipe Toledo (Brazil).[6]

Corona Bali ProtectedEdit

The Corona Bali Protected was the third stop of the men's championship tour in 2019, taking place between the 13-25th May in Bali, Indonesia. Kanoa Igarashi (Japan) won this event, defeating Jeremy Flores (France) in the final.[6]

Margaret River ProEdit

The Margaret River Pro took place in Western Australia from the 29 May to 4 June. John John Florence (Hawaii) defeated Kolohe Andino (USA) to win the event.[6]

Rio ProEdit

The Oi Rio Pro took place in Saquarema, Rio De Janeiro from the 20-23 June 2019. Filipe Toledo (Brazil) defeated Jordy Smith (South Africa) to win the event with a score in the final of 18.04.[6]

J-Bay OpenEdit

The Corona Open J-Bay took place at Jeffery's Bay, South Africa, from the 9 to the 19th July. Gabriel Medina (Brazil) defeated Italo Ferreia (Brazil) for the event win.[6]

Tahiti ProEdit

The Tahiti Pro Teahupo'o took place at Teahupo'o in Tahiti, French Polynesia from the 24-29 August. Owen Wright (Australia) defeated Gabriel Medina (Brazil) in the final, with a total score of 17.07.[6]

Freshwater ProEdit

The Freshwater Pro was held from the 19-24 September at the Surf Ranch, in Lemoore, California. Gabriel Medina (Brazil) won the event with a total score of 18.86, defeating Filipe Toledo (Brazil).[6]

Quicksilver Pro FranceEdit

The Quicksilver Pro France took place from the 3 to 11 October at Capbreton, Hossegor and Seignosse, Landes, France. Jeremy Flores (France) won the event, defeating Italo Ferreria in the final.[6]

RipCurl Pro PortugalEdit

The MEO RipCurl Pro Portugal took place from the 16-28 October at Supertubos, Peniche. Italo Ferreria (Brazil) defeated Jordy Smith (South Africa) in the final.[6]

Pipe MastersEdit

The Billabong Pipe Masters is the penultimate event of the men's championship tour, taking place from the 9-19 December in 2019. Italo Ferreria (Brazil) defeated Gabriel Medina (Brazil) in the final, while also securing the 2019 World Title.[6]

2019 Men's Championship Tour Jeep LeaderboardEdit

Points are awarded using the following structure:

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   5th   9th   17th   33rd   INJ   PAR   DNC 
Points 10.000 7.800 6.085 4.745 3.320 1.330 265 265 265 0

Point values are shown using European thousands separators; most English-speaking countries would write these numbers as 10,000 for first place, 7,800 for 2nd place, and so on.

Ranking +/- Surfer  
WCT 1
(Details)
 
WCT 2
(Details)
 
WCT 3
(Details)
 
WCT 4
(Details)
 
WCT 5
(Details)
 
WCT 6
(Details)
 
WCT 7
(Details)
 
WCT 8
(Details)
 
WCT 9
(Details)
 
WCT 10
(Details)
 
WCT 11
(Details)
Points
1     Italo Ferreira (BRA) 1st 5th 17th 5th 17th 2nd 17th 9th 2nd 1st 1st 59.740
2     Gabriel Medina (BRA) 5th 5th 17th 17th 5th 1st 2nd 1st 9th 9th 2nd 56.475
3     Jordy Smith (ZAF) 3rd 3rd 17th 5th 2nd 9th 3rd 5th 9th 2nd 17th 49.985
4     Filipe Toledo (BRA) 9th 2nd 5th 17th 1st 3rd 9th 2nd 17th 5th 17th 49.145
5     Kolohe Andino (USA) 2nd 17th 5th 2nd 3rd 3rd 17th 17th 5th 5th 9th 46.655
6     Kanoa Igarashi (JPN) 9th 9th 1st 9th 5th 5th 17th 9th 17th 3rd 17th 40.185
7     John John Florence (HAW) 3rd 1st 17th 1st 5th INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ 5th 37.700
8     Kelly Slater (USA) 33rd 5th 3rd 9th 9th 9th 17th 9th 17th 9th 3rd 34.845
9     Owen Wright (AUS) 9th 9th 17th 9th 17th 5th 1st 3rd 17th 17th 17th 34.780
10     Jérémy Florès (FRA) 17th 9th 2nd 17th 33rd 17th 5th 17th 1st 17th 33rd 32.515
11     Julian Wilson (AUS) 17th 17th 9th 3rd 5th 17th 9th 5th 9th 17th 9th 31.515
12     Seth Moniz (HAW) 5th 9th 17th 5th 17th 17th 3rd 17th 9th 33rd 9th 29.525
13     Michel Bourez (FRA) 9th 17th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 33rd 9th 17th 5th 29.315
14     Ryan Callinan (AUS) 17th 3rd 9th 5th 17th 9th 17th 17th 5th 33rd 17th 27.535
14     Jack Freestone (AUS) 17th 17th 9th 17th 17th 17th 9th 17th 3rd 5th 5th 27.535
16     Griffin Colapinto (USA) 17th INJ 17th 17th 9th 17th 9th 3rd 17th 9th 3rd 27.450
17     Caio Ibelli (BRA) 33rd 17th 17th 3rd 17th 17th 5th 17th 17th 3rd 9th 26.885
18     Wade Carmichael (AUS) 5th 17th 5th 33rd 9th 17th 17th 9th 9th 9th 17th 26.760
19     Adrian Buchan (AUS) 17th 17th 5th 33rd 33rd 5th 17th 5th 5th 17th 17th 25.630
20     Conner Coffin (USA) 5th 9th 9th 9th 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 9th 17th 23.345
20     Peterson Crisanto (BRA) 17th 9th 17th 9th 33rd 9th 17th 33rd 17th 5th 9th 23.345
22     Yago Dora (BRA) 9th 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 5th 9th 17th 5th 22.780
23     Deivid Silva (BRA) 17th 9th 17th 17th 9th 9th 9th 9th 33rd 17th 17th 21.920
24     Willian Cardoso (BRA) 9th 9th 17th 17th 17th 9th 17th 9th 17th 17th 17th 19.930
24     Jesse Mendes (BRA) 17th 33rd 9th 17th 9th 33rd 17th 17th 17th 9th 9th 19.930
26     Michael Rodrigues (BRA) 17th 17th 3rd 17th 9th 17th 33rd 33rd 17th 9th 33rd 19.640
27     Sebastian Zietz (HAW) 17th PAR 33rd 9th 17th 5th 17th 9th 33rd 17th 17th 18.300
28     Joan Duru (FRA) 17th 33rd 9th 17th 9th 17th 9th 17th 17th 17th 17th 17.940
28     Ezekiel Lau (HAW) 17th 17th 33rd 17th 17th 9th 17th 9th 9th 33rd 17th 17.940
30     Soli Bailey (AUS) 17th 17th 33rd 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 9th 9th 15.950
31     Leonardo Fioravanti (ITA) 33rd 17th 9th 17th INJ INJ INJ INJ 3rd 17th 33rd 14.455
32     Jadson Andre (BRA) 33rd 17th 17th 17th 17th 33rd 5th 17th 33rd 17th 17th 14.320
33     Ricardo Christie (NZL) 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 17th 33rd 33rd 9th 13.960
34     Frederico Morais (PRT) - - - 33rd 3rd 17th 33rd - 17th 17th 33rd 10.870
35     Adriano de Souza (BRA) INJ INJ INJ INJ 17th 17th 5th INJ INJ INJ INJ 8.995
36     Mikey Wright (AUS) 9th 17th 17th INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ 7.570
37     Jacob Willcox (AUS) - 5th 33rd 33rd - - - - - - - 5.275
38     Marc Lacomare (FRA) - - - - - - - - 5th - - 4.745
39     Reef Heazlewood (AUS) 9th 17th - - - - - - - - - 4.650
40     Jack Robinson (AUS) - - - 9th - - - - - - - 3.320
40     Kauli Vaast (FRA) - - - - - - 9th - - - - 3.320
42     Crosby Colapinto (USA) - - - - - - - 17th - 17th - 2.660
43     Mateus Herdy (BRA) 17th - - - INJ - - 33rd - - - 1.860
44     Jorgann Couzinet (FRA) - - - - - 33rd - - 17th - - 1.595
45     Rio Waida (INA) - - 17th - - - - - - - - 1.330
45     Krystian Kymerson (BRA) - - - - 17th - - - - - - 1.330
45     Michael February (ZAF) - - - - - 17th - - - - - 1.330
45     Barron Mamiya (HAW) - - - - - - - 17th - - - 1.330
45     Kade Matson (USA) - - - - - - - 17th - - - 1.330
45     Jett Schilling (USA) - - - - - - - 17th - - - 1.330
45     Marco Mignot (FRA) - - - - - - - - 17th - - 1.330
45     Vasco Ribeiro (PRT) - - - - - - - - - 17th - 1.330
45     Miguel Blanco (PRT) - - - - - - - - - 17th - 1.330
45     Imaikalani deVault (HAW) - - - - - - - - - - 17th 1.330
45     Billy Kemper (HAW) - - - - - - - - - - 17th 1.330
56     Harrison Mann (AUS) - 33rd - - - - - - - - - 265
56     Xavier Huxtable (AUS) - 33rd - - - - - - - - - 265
56     Alex Ribeiro (BRA) - - - - 33rd - - - - - - 265
56     Beyrick De Vries (ZAF) - - - - - 33rd - - - - - 265
56     Tyler Newton (HAW) - - - - - - 33rd - - - - 265
56     Matahi Drollet (PYF) - - - - - - 33rd - - - - 265
  • Championship Tour surfers best 9 of 11 results are combined to equal their final point total.
  • Tournament results discarded

Legend

Champion
Men's QS 2020
Two worst results

Source

2019 Women's Championship TourEdit

Boost Mobile Pro Gold CoastEdit

The Boost Mobile Pro Gold Coast was the first event in the women's championship tour in 2019. It was held on the Gold Coast, and Caroline Marks (USA) defeated Carissa Moore (Hawaii) for the event win.[7]

Rip Curl Pro Bells BeachEdit

The Rip Curl Pro Bells Beach was held from April 17-27, at Bells Beach in Victoria, Australia. Courtney Conologue (USA) won the event, defeating Malia Manuel (Hawaii) in the final.[7]

Corona Bali ProtectedEdit

The Corona Bali Protected was held in Bali, Indonesia from the 13-25 May. Stephanie Gilmore (Australia) won the event, defeating Sally Fitzgibbons (Australia) with a score of 16.83.[7]

Margaret River ProEdit

The 2019 Margaret River Pro was held at Margaret River Main Break, in Western Australia, from the 29 May- 9 June. Lakey Peterson (Australia) won the event, defeating Tatiana Weston Webb (Brazil) in the final.[7]

Oi Rio ProEdit

The Oi Rio Pro took place in Saquarema, Rio De Janeiro from the 20-28 June 2019. Sally Fitzgibbons (Australia) won this event, defeating Carissa Moore (Hawaii) in the final.[7]

Corona Open J-BayEdit

The Corona Open J-Bay was held from the 9-22nd July at Jefferys Bay, South Africa. Carissa Moore (Hawaii) defeated Lakey Peterson (USA) in the final to win the event.[7]

Freshwater ProEdit

The Freshwater Pro was held from the 19-21 September at the Surf Ranch, in Lemoore, California. Lakey Peterson (USA) was the winner of this event.[7]

Roxy Pro FranceEdit

The Roxy Pro France was held from the 3-13 October at Capbreton, Hossegor, Seignosse, and Landes in France. Carissa Moore (Hawaii) defeated Caroline Marks (USA) to win the event.[7]

MEO RipCurl Pro PortugalEdit

The MEO RipCurl Pro Portugal was held from the 16-28th October in Peniche, Portugal. Caroline Marks (USA) defeated Lakey Peterson (USA) to win the event.[7]

lululemon Maui ProEdit

The Maui Pro was the penultimate event of the women's championship tour in 2019. It was held from the 25 November to the 6 December in Honolulu Bay, in Maui, Hawaii. Stephanie Gilmore (Australia) defeated Tyler Wright (Australia) to win the event.[7]

2019 Women's Championship Tour Jeep LeaderboardEdit

Points are awarded using the following structure:

Position  1st   2nd   3rd   5th   9th   17th   INJ   DNC 
Points 10.000 7.800 6.085 4.745 2.610 1.045 1.045 0

Point values are shown using European thousands separators; most English-speaking countries would write these numbers as 10,000 for first place, 7,800 for 2nd place, and so on.

Ranking +/- Surfer  
WCT 1
(Details)
 
WCT 2
(Details)
 
WCT 3
(Details)
 
WCT 4
(Details)
 
WCT 5
(Details)
 
WCT 6
(Details)
 
WCT 7
(Details)
 
WCT 8
(Details)
 
WCT 9
(Details)
 
WCT 10
(Details)
Points
1     Carissa Moore (HAW) 2nd 5th 5th 3rd 2nd 1st 3rd 1st 3rd 3rd 59.940
2     Caroline Marks (USA) 1st 3rd 9th 5th 9th 3rd 3rd 2nd 1st 5th 55.545
3     Lakey Peterson (USA) 9th 3rd 9th 1st 5th 2nd 1st 3rd 2nd 9th 55.125
4     Stephanie Gilmore (AUS) 5th 5th 1st 5th 3rd 5th 5th 17th 5th 1st 49.810
5     Sally Fitzgibbons (AUS) 3rd 9th 2nd 3rd 1st 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 48.950
6     Tatiana Weston-Webb (BRA) 5th 9th 9th 2nd 5th 9th 5th 5th 3rd 3rd 41.560
7     Courtney Conlogue (USA) 9th 1st 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 9th INJ 41.080
8     Johanne Defay (FRA) 5th 9th 9th 9th 9th 5th 2nd 3rd 5th 5th 38.085
9     Malia Manuel (HAW) 3rd 2nd 9th 9th 9th 3rd 9th 5th 17th 9th 35.155
10     Nikki Van Dijk (AUS) 9th 9th 3rd 9th 17th 9th 9th 9th 5th 5th 28.625
11     Brisa Hennessy (CRI) 9th 5th 3rd 5th 17th 9th 17th 9th 9th 17th 27.060
12     Silvana Lima (BRA) INJ INJ 5th 9th 5th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 25.150
13     Bronte Macaulay (AUS) 9th 9th 5th 9th 9th 9th 9th 17th 9th 9th 23.015
13     Coco Ho (HAW) 9th 5th 9th 9th 9th INJ 9th 9th 9th 9th 23.015
15     Keely Andrew (AUS) 17th 17th 9th 9th 3rd 9th 9th 9th 9th 17th 22.790
16     Paige Hareb (NZL) 17th 17th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 20.880
17     Macy Callaghan (AUS) 9th 9th 17th 17th 9th 9th 17th 9th 9th 9th 19.315
18     Tyler Wright (AUS) INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ INJ 2nd 15.115
19     Sage Erickson (USA) 5th 9th - - - 17th - - - - 8.400
20     Isabella Nichols (AUS) 9th - - - - - - - - - 2.610
20     Kobie Enright (AUS) - 9th - - - - - - - - 2.610
20     Taina Hinckel (BRA) - - - - 9th - - - - - 2.610
20     Gabriela Bryan (HAW) - - - - - - 9th - - - 2.610
20     Vahine Fierro (FRA) - - - - - - - 9th - - 2.610
20     Summer Macedo (HAW) - - - - - - - - - 9th 2.610
26     Kailani Johnson (INA) - - 17th - - - - - - - 1.045
26     Mia McCarthy (AUS) - - - 17th - - - - - - 1.045
26     Bianca Buitendag (ZAF) - - - - - 17th - - - - 1.045
26     Alana Blanchard (HAW) - - - - - - - - 17th - 1.045
  • Championship Tour surfers best 8 of 10 results are combined to equal their final point total.
  • Tournament results discarded

Legend

Champion
Women's QS 2020
two worst results

Source

Qualifying SeriesEdit

2019 Men's Qualifying SeriesEdit

Position  1st   2nd   3rd-4th   5th-8th   9th 
Ranking +/- Surfer Events Points
1 2 3 4 5
1     Frederico Morais (PRT) 10.000 6.000 3.700 3.700 3.000 26.400
2     Jadson Andre (BRA) 6.500 6.000 4.500 4.500 2.300 23.800
3     Yago Dora (BRA) 10.000 6.500 4.500 1.100 1.100 23.200
4     Matthew McGillivray (ZAF) 6.700 5.200 5.200 3.800 1.680 22.580
5     Jack Robinson (AUS) 10.000 3.700 3.550 3.000 1.680 21.930
6     Alex Ribeiro (BRA) 6.500 6.000 3.700 3.700 1.680 21.580
7     Miguel Pupo (BRA) 10.000 3.700 3.550 2.200 1.550 21.000
8     Ethan Ewing (AUS) 6.700 6.300 5.200 1.100 1.100 20.400
9     Connor O'Leary (AUS) 5.200 5.200 3.600 3.000 2.650 19.650
10     Deivid Silva (BRA) 10.000 3.700 2.300 1.550 1.100 18.650
11     Morgan Cibilic (AUS) 6.500 3.700 3.600 2.200 2.100 18.100
12     Stuart Kennedy (AUS) 8.000 5.100 2.650 1.125 1.100 17.975
13     Jake Marshall (USA) 8.000 3.550 2.650 2.200 1.550 17.950
14     Barron Mamiya (HAW) 5.200 3.800 3.700 2.650 2.250 17.600
15     Jorgann Couzinet (FRA) 6.500 5.200 2.250 1.680 1.680 17.310
16     Jack Freestone (AUS) 8.000 3.800 3.700 1.100 700 17.300
17     Ezekiel Lau (HAW) 8.000 3.700 2.300 2.250 1.000 17.250
18     Samuel Pupo (BRA) 10.000 3.700 1.550 1.050 840 17.140

Legend

Men's CT 2020

Source

2019 Women's Qualifying SeriesEdit

Position  1st   2nd   3rd-4th   5th-8th   9th 
Ranking +/- Surfer Events Points
1 2 3 4 5
1     Isabella Nichols (AUS) 6.000 5.200 4.500 4.500 3.700 23.900
2     Bronte Macaulay (AUS) 8.000 5.200 3.550 2.650 2.650 22.050
3     Sage Erickson (USA) 10.000 5.200 3.000 700 700 19.600
4     Tatiana Weston-Webb (BRA) 6.500 4.500 3.700 2.650 1.050 18.400
5     Brisa Hennessy (CRI) 6.500 3.700 3.550 1.550 1.050 16.350
6     Macy Callaghan (AUS) 6.500 4.500 2.200 1.050 650 14.900
7     Keely Andrew (AUS) 3.700 3.700 2.650 2.650 1.550 14.250
8     Amuro Tsuzuki (JPN) 10.000 1.680 1.000 700 700 14.080
9     Caroline Marks (USA) 5.200 3.550 3.000 1.550 700 14.000
10     Alyssa Spencer (USA) 3.700 3.700 2.650 2.250 1.680 13.980
11     Zahli Kelly (AUS) 3.700 3.550 3.000 1.550 1.550 13.350

Legend

Women's CT 2020

Source

Olympic QualificationEdit

For the first time in Olympic history surfing will be included in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. The WSL 2019 Tour, in conjunction with other events, will be used for Olympic qualification for the 2020 Olympics.[8]

In an agreement reached by the International Surfing Association and the WSL, it was decided that of the 40 places in the Olympic games, 20 would be determined from the ISA World Surfing games, 18 from the WSL (10 men 8 women) and the remaining 2 for the host nation.[9]

2020 Tokyo OlympicsEdit

The following surfers qualified for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics through the WSL;[10]

Men
Rank Name
1   Ítalo Ferreira (BRA)
2   Gabriel Medina (BRA)
3   Jordy Smith (RSA)
5   Kolohe Andino (USA)1
6   Kanoa Igarashi (JPN)
7   John John Florence (USA)1
9   Owen Wright (AUS)
10   Jérémy Florès (FRA)
11   Julian Wilson (AUS)
13   Michel Bourez (FRA)

1 Represented Hawaii in the 2019 WSL, Qualified to represent the United States at the 2020 Summer Olympics.

Women
Rank Name
1   Carissa Moore (USA)1
2   Caroline Marks (USA)
4   Stephanie Gilmore (AUS)
5   Sally Fitzgibbons (AUS)
6   Tatiana Weston-Webb (BRA)
8   Johanne Defay (FRA)
11   Brisa Hennessy (CRC)
12   Silvana Lima (BRA)

1 Represented Hawaii in the 2019 WSL, Qualified to represent the United States at the 2020 Summer Olympics.

Changes to 2019 seasonEdit

Competition FormatEdit

The competition format of the 2019 Championship Tour was changed from previous years. In 2019, all competitors were to compete in a Seeding Round. From this seeding round, the two highest scoring surfers in each heat advance to round of 32, and the lowest placed surfer competes in an elimination round. In the elimination round heats, the top two surfers from each heat progress to the round of 32, while the losing four are eliminated. A single elimination format is then used from the Round of 32, with only the heat winner advancing.[11]

Prize MoneyEdit

2018 saw 36 Male surfers compete for $607,800 across the tour, while the 18 women on tour were competing for $303,900. In individual events such as the 2018 RipCurl pro, the Male winner Italo Ferreira was awarded $100,000 while the female winner, Stephanie Gilmore, was awarded $65,000.[12]The WSL announced on the 5 September 2018 that female and male surfers, from the 2019 tour onwards, would receive equal prize money.[13]

This was partnered with three initiatives by the WSL to elevate and enhance equality in female surfing, including; increased marketing of the women’s tour, a “local community engagement program for girls around the world” structured around the world tour events, and “a monthly content series” about the history of female surfing. This change has been recognised as a “wider push to challenge gender norms and improve the status of women across sport industries globally”.[14] An article on the topic found that “female surfers will likely be encouraged to pursue surfing as a professional sport, knowing that the financial cost of their attempts to reach the championship tour will be less daunting” as while professional tour surfers are often supported by sponsors and investors, it is the women on the qualifying tour who must fund their own efforts to go professional.[15]

This has further been recognised as part of ongoing cultural change with regards to gender equality and social justice not only in sport but in the global community, with it argued that “the voices and experiences of athletes” form critical part of progressive movement.[16] Kelly Slater stated that “the women on the tour deserve this change. I'm so proud that surfing is choosing to lead sports in equality and fairness. The female WSL athletes are equally committed to their craft as the male athletes and should be paid the same. Surfing has always been a pioneering sport, and this serves as an example of that."[17] Stephanie Gilmore stated “the prize money is fantastic, but the message means even more. From the moment current ownership became involved, the situation for the women surfers has been transformed for the better in every way”, and that she hoped this change would serve “as a model for other sports, global organizations and society as a whole”.[18]


WSL PureEdit

WSL Pure is the philanthropic branch of the WSL, focusing on ocean health and sustainability. The WSL Pure campaign made three commitments to be completed by the end of 2019.

Commitment to eliminate single use plasticEdit

The WSL pledged to remove the usage of single-serve plastics from their events by the end of 2019 in light of their impact on the marine environment. This is due to the breakdown of these single use plastics into microparticles, which bioaccumulate, shown in studies that found 83% of the worlds drinking water is contaminated with microplastic[19]

Commitment to becoming carbon neutralEdit

The WSL made the commitment to become carbon neutral by the end of 2019, as the movement of surfers globally to compete and spectate WSL events leaves a substantial carbon footprint. WSL pure pledged to reinvest “the cost of our tour’s carbon footprint into projects that safeguard marine life”.

Commitment to coast environment protectionEdit

The WSL further made the commitment to protecting the environments where they hold events. The WSL stated that from trampling over sand dunes, to sunscreen bleaching reefs, wherever we travel, humans leave their mark and our coastal communities are continually feeling this pressure”.[20]They aim to alleviate and help mitigate this human impact. This includes protecting dunes, ensuring adequate trash removal, the use of reef-safe sunscreen, following local instruction to protect sensitive habitats and donating to local organisations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Event Schedule 2019". World Surf League. Retrieved 2020-10-30.
  2. ^ "ASP Announces World Surf League: Letter from CEO". World Surf League. Retrieved 2020-10-30.
  3. ^ SurferToday.com, Editor at. "The 2019 World Surf League calendar". Surfertoday. Retrieved 2020-10-30.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  4. ^ "Carissa Moore surfs into the record books with 4th world title". www.redbull.com. Retrieved 2020-10-30.
  5. ^ "Men's Championship Tour Rankings 2019". World Surf League. Retrieved 2020-10-30.
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External linksEdit