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The 2019 Irish local elections were held in all local authorities in Ireland on Friday, 24 May 2019, on the same day as the 2019 European Parliament election and a referendum easing restrictions on divorce.[1][2] Each local government area is divided into local electoral areas (LEAs) where three to seven councillors are elected on the system of proportional representation by means of the single transferable vote.[3]

2019 Irish local elections

← 2014 24 May 2019 2024 →

949 County and City Council Seats
Opinion polls
Turnout50.2%
  First party Second party Third party
  Micheal Martin (official portrait) (cropped).jpg Leo Varadkar 2016.jpg Mary Lou McDonald (official portrait) (cropped).jpg
Leader Micheál Martin Leo Varadkar Mary Lou McDonald
Party Fianna Fáil Fine Gael Sinn Féin
Leader since 26 January 2011 2 June 2017 10 February 2018
Last election 267 235 159
Seats won 279 255 81
Seat change Increase12 Increase20 Decrease78
Popular vote 467,407 438,494 164,637
Percentage 26.92% 25.26% 9.48%
Swing Increase1.72% Increase1.34% Decrease5.68%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Brendan Howlin Aviva (cropped).jpg Eamon Ryan Green Party.jpg Róisín Shortall TD and Catherine Murphy TD cropped.jpg
Leader Brendan Howlin Eamon Ryan Catherine Murphy
Róisín Shortall
Party Labour Party Green Party Social Democrats
Leader since 20 May 2016 27 May 2011 15 July 2015
Last election 51 12 n/a (new party)
Seats won 57 49 19
Seat change Increase6 Increase37 Increase19
Popular vote 99,500 96,315 39,644
Percentage 5.73% 5.55% 2.28%
Swing Decrease1.41% Increase3.95% Increase2.28%

  Seventh party Eighth party Ninth party
  Peadar Tóibín 2012.jpg
Leader Collective leadership Peadar Tóibín
Party Solidarity–PBP Aontú Inds. 4 Change
Leader since n/a 28 January 2019
Last election 28[nb 1] n/a (new party) n/a (new party)
Seats won 11 (Sol 4) (PBP 7) 3 3
Seat change Decrease17 Increase3 Increase3
Popular vote 32,883 (Sol 10,911) (PBP 21,972)
Percentage 1.89% (Sol 0.64%) (PBP 1.29%)
Swing Decrease1.11% (Sol Decrease0.60%) (PBP Decrease0.41%)

Map of 2019 Irish local elections.svg

Administrative changesEdit

There was one change to the local government areas since the 2014 elections, with a transfer of land from County Cork to Cork city under the Local Government Act 2019.[4]

Reviews of the county boundaries near Drogheda,[5][6] Athlone,[7][8] and Carlow (Graiguecullen)[9][10] recommended no change. A review recommending transfer of Ferrybank from Kilkenny County Council to Waterford City and County Council was rejected by minister Simon Coveney after objections from Kilkenny.[11][12]

Two Local Electoral Area Boundary Committees were established in 2017 under the Local Government Reform Act 2014 and reported on 13 June 2018.[13] The government accepted all recommendations and the boundaries of municipal districts and LEAs were consequently revised by statutory instruments signed on 19 December 2018 by John Paul Phelan, Minister of State at the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government.[14] In 2014, most districts had a single LEA and all LEAs, back then,(except for Cork city) had between 6 and 10 councillors, whereas in 2019 LEAs will had between 3 and 7 councillors and some large municipal districts on the west coast had two LEAs to account for the greater distances involved for elected representatives.

Under the 2014 Act, the municipal districts containing the area of the former borough councils of Clonmel, Drogheda, Sligo and Wexford are designated as borough districts. The Boundary Committee proposed also designating census towns over 30,000 as borough districts, which would include the towns of Bray, Navan and Dundalk. A change to this designation was made by statutory instrument but was later reversed as incompatible with the 2014 act.[15]

Mayoral plebiscitesEdit

Plebiscites took place in Cork City Council, Limerick City and County Council and Waterford City and County Council on whether to create the office of directly-elected mayors with executive functions who will act as an ex officio member and chair of the council.[16][17] These plebiscites were held under Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2019.[18] The proposal was approved in Limerick City and County and rejected in both Cork City and Waterford City and County.[19]

Election timetableEdit

The elections were held in accordance with the Local Elections Regulations 1995 as amended.[20][21] Relevant dates are as follows:

CampaignEdit

Fine Gael head office issued a pre-election circular to its candidates on strategy for negotiating post-election power-sharing deals with other parties or groups.[25] It prohibits deals with Sinn Féin, except where a council shares power across all groups (typically via D'Hondt method allocation of posts).[25]

Garda inquiries were launched in relation to an unusually large number of postal vote applications in the BallymoteTubbercurry LEA,[26] and alleged irregularities around 200 names added to the supplementary electoral register in the Killarney LEA.[27]

Ellie Kisyombe, a Malawi-born refugee running for the Social Democrats in Dublin's North Inner City LEA, was retained after a review of inconsistencies in her account of her asylum history and time in Direct Provision, which caused several party members to resign in protest.[28] The principal of Cadamstown national school in County Kildare was criticised for a letter to parents praising Fianna Fáil councillors over those of Fine Gael in dealing with the school.[29]

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar stated after the poll that news of a personal injury claim taken by Fine Gael TD Maria Bailey in the week preceding the elections had caused reputational damage to Fine Gael.[30]

Opinion pollsEdit

Last date
of polling
Polling firm / Commissioner Sample
size
FG FF SF Lab S–PBP SD GP RI IA O/I[nb 2]
17 April 2019 Red C/The Sunday Business Post[31] 1,000 27 20 15 5 0 1 5 0 4 23[nb 3]

Overall resultsEdit

Republican Sinn Féin and Independent Left are not registered parties; therefore their candidates appear on the ballot as Non-Party.

People Before Profit and Solidarity candidates ran under the electoral alliance Solidarity-People Before Profit

Party Seats ± 1st Pref. votes FPv% ±%
Fianna Fáil 279  12 467,407 26.92  1.72
Fine Gael 255  20 438,494 25.26  1.34
Sinn Féin 81  78 164,637 9.48  5.68
Labour Party 57  6 99,500 5.73  1.41
Green Party 49  37 96,315 5.55  3.95
Social Democrats 19 New 39,644 2.28 New
People Before Profit 7   7 21,972 1.29   0.41
Solidarity 4   10 10,911 0.64   0.60
Aontú 3 New 25,660 1.48 New
Inds. 4 Change 3  3 8,626 0.50  0.39
Renua 1 New 10,115 0.58 New
Workers and Unemployed Action 1   2,621 0.15  0.04
Workers' Party 1  1 2,620 0.15  0.03
Kerry Independent Alliance 1   1,983 0.11  0.01
Independent Left 1 New 1,808 0.10 New
Irish Democratic Party 1 New 1,054 0.06 New
Republican Sinn Féin 1   971 0.06  0.03
Éirígí 0   1,547 0.09  0.09
HRRA 0   1,462 0.08  0.08
Direct Democracy 0   585 0.03  0.18
United People 0   134 0.01  0.01
Independent 185  7 339,246 19.54  3.24
Totals 949 1,736,139 100.00
Electorate: 3,559,633 Total votes: 1,772,022 Spoilt votes: 35,883 (2.03%) Turnout: 49.78%

Results by councilEdit

Authority FF FG SF Lab GP SD PBP Sol I4C Aon Ren WUA WP RSF KIA IDP IL Ind Total Details
Carlow 6 6 1 2 1 2 18 Details
Cavan 8 7 1 1 1 18 Details
Clare 13 8 1 1 5 28 Details
Cork 18 20 2 2 2 1 10 55 Details
Cork City 8 7 4 1 4 1 1 5 31 Details
Donegal 12 6 10 1 8 37 Details
Dublin City 11 9 8 8 10 5 2 1 1[nb 4] 8 63 Details
Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown 7 13 6 6 1 2 5 40 Details
Fingal 8 7 4 6 5 2 1 1 6 40 Details
Galway 15 11 1 1 1[nb 5] 10 39 Details
Galway City 5 3 1 2 1 6 18 Details
Kerry 10 7 4 2 1 9 33 Details
Kildare 12 11 1 5 3 4 4 40 Details
Kilkenny 11 9 2 1 1 24 Details
Laois 6 7 2 1 3 19 Details
Leitrim 6 6 2 4 18 Details
Limerick 12 14 2 3 2 1 6 40 Details
Longford 6 9 3 18 Details
Louth 7 5 7 3 1 6 29 Details
Mayo 11 12 1 6 30 Details
Meath 12 12 3 1 1 1 10 40 Details
Monaghan 4 5 6 3 18 Details
Offaly 8 4 1 1 1 1 3 19 Details
Roscommon 6 2 1 9 18 Details
Sligo 5 6 2 1 1 3 18 Details
South Dublin 8 7 6 2 4 1 1 2 9 40 Details
Tipperary 9 12 2 1 1 15 40 Details
Waterford 7 7 6 4 2 6 32 Details
Westmeath 9 5 2 2 2 20 Details
Wexford 12 9 2 2 1 8 34 Details
Wicklow 7 9 2 2 2 1 9 32 Details
Totals 279 255 81 57 49 19 7 4 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 185 949

See alsoEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Contested the 2014 election as two separate parties: Anti-Austerity Alliance and People Before Profit. Each won 14 seats.
  2. ^ This column includes figures for Independents 4 Change and Aontú when available.
  3. ^ A figure for 'Others/Independents' is not mentioned in the cited source, but has been calculated by subtracting the other parties from 100%, so the figure shown may be slightly inaccurate due to rounding effects.
  4. ^ Independent Left (Ireland) is an unregistered party; therefore Lyons appears on official lists as non-Party.
  5. ^ Republican Sinn Féin is an unregistered party; therefore Curraoin appears on official lists as non-Party.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Polling Day Orders made for European and local elections". Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 25 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  2. ^ Reidy, Theresa (6 March 2019). "The ins and outs and ups and downs of local elections". RTÉ. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  3. ^ "Local Elections in Ireland". Citizens Information Board. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  4. ^ "Local Government Act 2019". Irish Statute Book. Attorney General of Ireland. 25 January 2019. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  5. ^ Casey, Ann (1 March 2017). "No changes for Meath boundaries". Meath Chronicle. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  6. ^ "Report of the Drogheda Boundary Review Committee" (PDF). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 16 February 2017. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  7. ^ McGarry, Patsy (24 Nov 2016). "Roscommon safe as boundary review recommends no change". The Irish Times. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  8. ^ "Report of the Athlone Boundary Review Committee" (PDF). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 3 November 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  9. ^ Miller, Steven (8 February 2017). "Graiguecullen to stay in Laois, proposes Boundary Committee". Laois Today. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  10. ^ "Report of the Carlow Boundary Review Committee" (PDF). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. December 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  11. ^ "Report of the Waterford Boundary Review Committee" (PDF). Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government. December 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2019.
  12. ^ "Coveney issues statement on the recommendations of the Waterford Boundary Committee" (Press release). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 3 Apr 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2018.
  13. ^ "Local Electoral Area Boundary Committees 2017 - Home Page". boundarycommittee.ie. Retrieved 2018-06-18.; Local Electoral Area Boundary Committee No. 1 Report 2018 (PDF). Dublin: Government Publications. 13 June 2018. ISBN 978-1-4064-2990-9.; Local Electoral Area Boundary Committee No. 2 Report 2018 (PDF). Dublin: Government Publications. 13 June 2018. ISBN 978-1-4064-2991-6.
  14. ^ "Local Authority Boundaries". Dáil debates. KildareStreet.com. 26 Mar 2019. Retrieved 16 April 2019.; "2018 Statutory Instruments". electronic Irish Statute Book (eISB). SI nos 610 to 638. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  15. ^ "Other Questions Local Electoral Area Boundary Committee Report". Dáil debates. KildareStreet.com. 15 January 2019. Retrieved 16 April 2019.; "2019 Statutory Instruments". electronic Irish Statute Book (eISB). SI nos 6 to 8. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  16. ^ "Ministers Murphy and Phelan announce further details of the plebiscites that will take place in Cork City, Limerick and Waterford". Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 21 March 2019. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  17. ^ "Proposal for directly elected mayors – Minister Phelan's Opening Dáil Statement". Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. 24 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  18. ^ "Local Government Act 2019". Irish Statute Book. 25 January 2019. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  19. ^ Miley, Ingrid (27 May 2019). "Cork, Waterford reject, Limerick backs plan for directly elected mayor". RTÉ News. Retrieved 30 May 2019.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Local Elections 2019". Dublin City Council. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  21. ^ "[Amendments to] S.I. No. 297/1995 - Local Elections Regulations, 1995". electronic Irish Statute Book (eISB). 4 April 2019. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  22. ^ a b c d Thornton, Gareth (25 March 2019). "Polling Day Orders made for European and local elections" (Press release). Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  23. ^ Cunningham, Paul (23 May 2019). "Voting begins on islands for Local, European Elections". RTÉ News. Retrieved 23 May 2019.
  24. ^ Brophy, Daragh (23 May 2019). "Candidates are out making their last pitches for your vote before the broadcast ban kicks in". TheJournal.ie. Retrieved 23 May 2019.
  25. ^ a b Doyle, Kevin (21 May 2019). "Fine Gael ban incoming councillors from 'power-sharing' agreements with Sinn Féin on councils". Irish Independent. Retrieved 22 May 2019.; Kelly, Fiach (21 May 2019). "Fine Gael orders councillors not to work with Sinn Féin after elections". The Irish Times. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  26. ^ Magnier, Eileen (22 May 2019). "Complaint received over postal votes in Sligo". RTÉ News. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  27. ^ "Full garda inquiry into Kerry electoral register claims". RTÉ News. 22 May 2019. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  28. ^ Bray, Jennifer (4 May 2019). "Ellie Kisyombe to run in elections after correcting backstory, party says". The Irish Times. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  29. ^ O'Brien, Carl. "Principal defends sending letter to parents praising Fianna Fáil". The Irish Times. Retrieved 22 May 2019.
  30. ^ Lavery, Callum (26 May 2019). "Maria Bailey's personal injury claim caused 'reputational damage' for Fine Gael - Varadkar". Irish Independent. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  31. ^ "RED C 2019 Irish Local Elections Poll" (PDF). RED C Research. 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.

External LinksEdit