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2019 European Parliament election in Italy

The 2019 European Parliament election in Italy will be held on 26 May 2019, electing members of the 9th Italian delegation to the European Parliament as part of the European elections held across the European Union.

2019 European Parliament election in Italy

← 2014 26 May 2019 2024 →

All 76 Italian seats to the European Parliament
Opinion polls
  First party Second party
  Nicola Zingaretti 2012 crop.jpg Di Maio 2018 (cropped).jpg
Leader Nicola Zingaretti Luigi Di Maio
Party Democratic Party Five Star Movement
Alliance S&D EFDD
Leader since 17 March 2019 23 September 2017
Last election 40.8%
31 seats
21.2%
17 seats

  Third party Fourth party
  Silvio Berlusconi 2018.jpg Matteo Salvini Viminale crop.jpg
Leader Silvio Berlusconi Matteo Salvini
Party Forza Italia League
Alliance EPP ENF
Leader since 18 January 1994 15 December 2013
Last election 16.8%
13 seats
6.2%
5 seats

Contents

Electoral systemEdit

The party-list proportional representation was the traditional electoral system of the Italian Republic from its establishment in 1946 to 1994, thus it was also adopted to elect the Italian members of the European Parliament (MEPs) since 1979.

Two levels were introduced: a national level to divide the seats among parties and a constituency level to distribute them among candidates in open lists. Five constituencies were established, each including 2–5 regions and each electing a fixed number of MEPs. At national level, seats are divided between party lists using the largest remainder method with Hare quota. Seats are allocated to parties and then to their most voted candidates.

In the run-up to the 2009 European Parliament election, the Italian Parliament introduced a national threshold of 4%. An exception was granted for parties representing some linguistic minorities: such lists can be connected with one of the major parties, combining their votes, provided that those parties reach the 4% threshold and that candidates from minority parties obtain a sufficient number of votes, no less than 50,000.

BackgroundEdit

In 2014 the governing Democratic Party (PD) of Prime Minister Matteo Renzi won the election with 40.8% of the vote and 31 seats, followed by the Five Star Movement (M5S) with 21.2% and 17 seats, and Forza Italia (FI) with 16.8% and 13 seats. As a result, the PD was the second largest national party in the European Parliament by number of seats after the German CDU/CSU and the largest among the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D).[1] The PD's score was also the best result for an Italian party in a nationwide election since the 1958 general election, when the Christian Democracy (DC) won 42.4% of the vote.

However in December 2016, after less than three years from the 2014 electoral landslide, Renzi was forced to resign after the defeat in the constitutional referendum and his foreign affairs minister, Paolo Gentiloni, was appointed new head of government.[2][3] Moreover the 2018 general election was characterized by a strong showing of "populist" parties. The centre-right coalition, led by Matteo Salvini's right-wing League, emerged with a plurality of seats in the Chamber of Deputies and in the Senate, while the anti-establishment M5S led by Luigi Di Maio became the party with the largest number of votes; Renzi's centre-left came only third, with the worst electoral result of its history.[4][5] However, no political group or party won an outright majority, resulting in a hung parliament.[6] After three months of negotiation, a government was finally formed on 1 June by the M5S and the League, with the M5S-linked independent Giuseppe Conte as Prime Minister, and Di Maio and Salvini Deputy Prime Ministers.[7][8]

In March 2019 Nicola Zingaretti was elected secretary of the PD.[9] Subsequently, in April, he presented a special logo for the election, including a large reference to "We Are Europeans", a manifesto launched by Carlo Calenda, and the symbol of the Party of European Socialists (PES).[10] Additionally, the PD is trying to forge an alliance with the Article One (MDP)[11] and minor parties. March and April registered more developments on the centre-left side of the political spectrum: under the new leadership of Benedetto Della Vedova, More Europe formed a joint list with Italy in Common (IiC),[12][13][14] the Italian Socialist Party (PSI),[15] the Italian Republican Party (PRI),[16][17] the Italian section of the European Democratic Party (EDP)[18] and minor parties; Italian Left (SI), the Communist Refoundation Party (PRC), minor parties and individual splinters from the disbanded Free and Equal (LeU) formed The Left (LS), a joint list inspired by the Party of the European Left (PEL);[19] the Federation of the Greens (FdV), Possible (Pos) and Green Italy (GI) formed Green Europe (EV), under the banner of the European Green Party (EGP).[20][21] On the centre-right side, FI welcomed in its lists candidates of the Union of the Centre (UdC) and several alike minor parties, while Brothers of Italy (FdI) formed a partnership with Direction Italy and minor groups.

Parties and leadersEdit

This is a list of the main active parties which would likely participate in the election and/or are polled in most opinion surveys.

Party Ideology Leader Alliance Current MEPs
Democratic Party[a] (PD) Social democracy Nicola Zingaretti S&D
29 / 73
Five Star Movement (M5S) Populism Luigi Di Maio EFDD
14 / 73
Forza Italia[b] (FI) Liberal conservatism Silvio Berlusconi EPP
13 / 73
League[c] (Lega) Right-wing populism Matteo Salvini ENF
6 / 73
Brothers of Italy[d] (FdI) National conservatism Giorgia Meloni ECR
4 / 73
The Left[e] (LS) Democratic socialism Nicola Fratoianni GUE/NGL
3 / 73
Green Europe[f] (EV) Green politics several leaders Greens/EFA
2 / 73
More Europe[g] (+E) Liberalism Benedetto Della Vedova ALDE
1 / 73
  1. ^ Running as "Democratic Party–We Are Europeans–PES" and including Article One and Demo.S. The list will also form an alliance with the French-speaking minority list ApE from Aosta Valley, composed of UV, UVP, ALPE, SA and EPAV. PD has 26 MEPs, MDP three.
  2. ^ Including UdC, IdeA, CP, MpA, NPSI, RC, EpI and individual members of NcI. The list will also form an alliance with SVP, German- and Ladin-speaking minority list from South Tyrol, for the occasion also including PATT from Trentino and SSk from Friuli-Venezia Giulia. FI has 11 MEPs, UdC one, SVP one.
  3. ^ Including (in the South) NcS and MNS.
  4. ^ Including DI, (in the North-East) AAC from South Tyrol and (in the Islands) DB from Sicily. FdI and DI have two MEPs each.
  5. ^ Including SI, PRC, AET, PdS and individual splinters from the disbanded LeU. SI has two MEPs, one sitting with S&D and one with GUE–NGL, PRC one, sitting with GUE–NGL.
  6. ^ Including FdV, Pos, GI and (in the North-East) Grüne. FdV and Pos have one MEP each, sitting with Greens/EFA and S&D, respectively.
  7. ^ Including IiC, PSI, PRI, the EDP's Italian section and (in the North-East) TK from South Tyrol.

Top candidatesEdit

In the following table the top candidates of each party/list in the five constituencies are listed.

Party North-West North-East Centre South Islands Source
Democratic Party
Giuliano Pisapia
Carlo Calenda
Simona Bonafé
Franco Roberti
Caterina Chinnici
[22][23]
Five Star Movement
Sabrina Pignedoli
Maria Angela Danzí
Daniela Rondinelli
Chiara Maria Gemma
Alessandra Todde
[24][25]
Forza Italia
Silvio Berlusconi
Antonio Tajani
Silvio Berlusconi
[26][27]
League
Matteo Salvini
[28][29]
Brothers of Italy
Giorgia Meloni
[30]
The Left
Eleonora Cirant
Silvia Prodi
Marilena Grassadonia
Eleonora Forenza
Corradino Mineo
[31]
Green Europe
Elena Grandi
Silvia Zamboni
Annalisa Corrado
Eliana Baldo
Nadia Spallitta
[32]
More Europe
Benedetto Della Vedova
Federico Pizzarotti
Emma Bonino
Raimondo Pasquino
Fabrizio Ferrandelli
[33]

Main parties' slogansEdit

Party Original slogan English translation Refs
Democratic Party Una nuova Europa, un'Italia più forte "A New Europe, a Stronger Italy" [34][35]
Five Star Movement Continuare per Cambiare "Continue to Change" [36][37]
Forza Italia Per Cambiare l'Europa "To Change Europe" [38][39]
League Prima l'Italia "Italy First" [40][41]
Brothers of Italy In Europa per Cambiare Tutto "In Europe to Change Everything" [42][43]
The Left Noi con Te "Us with You" [44][45]
Green Europe Tocca a Noi "It's up to Us" [46]
More Europe Un'altra Italia c'è "There is another Italy" [47][48]

Opinion pollingEdit

Poll results are listed according to the date of publication of the survey. Detailed data are usually published in the official website of the Italian government. The publication of opinion polls during the last 15 days of the electoral campaign is forbidden by Italian law.

Date Polling firm Sample size PD M5S FI Lega LS FdI EV +E Others Lead
20 Apr Ipsos 18.7 22.3 8.7 36.9 2.1 4.6 1.3 3.0 2.4 14.6
16 Apr EMG 1,794 21.8 22.6 9.5 32.1 2.9 4.9 2.9 3.3 9.5

Hypothetical polls

Date Polling firm Sample size PD M5S FI Lega LeU[a] FdI +E PaP[b] EV[c] LS Others Lead
16 Apr Piepoli 503 20.5 22.5 10.5 31.0 1.5 5.5 3.0 1.5 2.0 1.5 8.5
16 Apr Euromedia 800 19.5 20.8 10.6 33.0 1.7 5.5 3.8 1.2 1.3 2.6 12.2
16 Apr Noto 20.0 21.0 9.0 33.5 6.0 3.5 1.5 3.0 2.5 12.5
10–15 Apr SWG 1,500 21.5 22.5 8.9 32.3 4.8 3.3 1.2 2.9 2.6 9.8
11–12 Apr Quorum 1,000 22.1 22.3 9.9 33.2 1.0 5.1 2.0 1.7 3.7 10.9
8–11 Apr Bidimedia 1,310 21.5 21.5 10.1 32.3 4.8 3.3 1.6 2.8 2.1 10.8
2–10 Apr Termometro Politico 1,500 21.7 22.6 9.8 32.0 5.6 3.0 1.4 2.3 1.6 9.4
9 Apr EMG 1,845 21.5 22.3 10.1 31.4 4.8 2.9 6.2 9.1
9 Apr Noto 21.0 20.0 9.5 32.5 1.5 5.5 3.0 1.0 6.0 11.5
3–8 Apr 2019 SWG 1,500 22.1 22.0 8.9 31.8 4.9 3.1 1.1 2.9 3.2 9.7
2–4 Apr 2019 Ipsos 1,000 19.0 23.3 9.9 35.7 4.0 3.1 0.7 2.0 2.3 12.4
3 Apr 2019 Piepoli 504 20.0 22.5 10.5 30.5 1.5 5.0 3.0 1.5 5.5 8.0
3 Apr 2019 Euromedia 800 20.1 19.4 11.1 31.4 1.5 5.4 3.8 2.4 4.9 11.3
2 Apr 2019 EMG 1,725 21.1 22.7 9.3 31.9 3.4 4.7 2.9 1.6 w. LeU w. LeU 2.4 9.2
2 Apr 2019 Noto 21.0 20.5 10.5 32.0 1.5 5.0 3.5 1.0 5.0 11.0
27 Mar–1 Apr 2019 SWG 1,500 20.8 22.2 9.0 32.9 1.0 4.6 2.9 1.3 2.3 3.0 10.7
25 Mar–1 Apr 2019 Termometro Politico 4,000 21.6 21.3 9.1 31.9 2.5 4.6 3.2 1.1 w. LeU 1.1 3.6 10.3
29–30 Mar 2019 Quorum – YouTrend 1,000 20.5 22.7 10.0 32.1 0.7 5.3 2.7 2.7 3.3 9.4
26 Mar 2019 EMG 1,865 21.1 22.9 9.5 31.8 4.9 3.0 1.6 5.2 8.9
26 Mar 2019 Noto 21.0 21.0 11.0 32.0 2.0 4.5 3.5 1.0 4.0 11.0
20–25 Mar 2019 SWG 1,500 21.0 21.3 8.7 33.4 2.3 4.7 2.9 2.2 1.0 w. LeU 2.5 12.1
21 Mar 2019 Piepoli 20.0 23.0 11.5 31.0 1.5 4.5 3.0 0.5 5.0 8.0
20–21 Mar 2019 Euromedia 800 20.7 19.8 11.4 33.1 1.5 4.7 3.6 0.7 4.5 12.4
16–20 Mar 2019 Bidimedia 1,245 21.2 21.1 9.7 33.0 4.1 2.7 1.8 3.0 3.4 11.8
19 Mar 2019 EMG 1,785 21.0 23.4 10.0 30.9 4.8 3.0 1.6 [d] 5.3 7.5
19 Mar 2019 Noto 21.0 21.0 11.0 32.5 1.5 4.5 3.5 1.0 4.0 11.5
13–18 Mar 2019 SWG 1,500 21.1 21.0 8.6 33.9 2.4 4.4 3.0 2.0 1.1 2.5 12.8
12 Mar 2019 EMG 1,845 19.9 23.8 9.8 30.6 4.9 3.1 1.6 6.3 6.8
12 Mar 2019 Piepoli 500 19.0 24.5 11.0 31.5 2.5 4.0 3.5 4.0 7.0
12 Mar 2019 Noto 21.0 21.0 11.5 32.5 1.5 4.0 3.5 1.0 4.0 11.5
6–11 Mar 2019 SWG 1,500 20.3 21.8 8.9 33.7 2.6 4.1 2.8 1.9 1.2 3.1 11.9
5 Mar 2019 EMG 1,803 19.3 23.2 10.2 31.2 4.8 3.1 1.4 6.8 8.0
5 Mar 2019 Noto 20.0 21.0 11.0 33.0 1.5 4.0 3.5 1.0 5.0 12.0
27 Feb–4 Mar 2019 SWG 1,500 19.8 22.1 8.8 33.4 2.4 4.4 3.0 2.0 1.1 3.1 11.3
26–28 Feb 2019 Ipsos 1,000 18.5 21.2 8.6 35.9 2.4 4.0 4.0 5.4 14.7
21–28 Feb 2019 Termometro Politico 2,400 20.5 21.3 8.2 31.5 4.5 4.1 2.8 7.1 10.2
22–27 Feb 2019 Bidimedia 1,084 18.6 22.0 9.0 33.2 1.4 4.2 3.4 3.4 1.7 3.1 11.2
26 Feb 2019 EMG 1,603 18.2 23.8 10.7 31.2 5.0 3.0 1.6 6.5 7.4
25 Feb 2019 Piepoli 505 18.5 25.0 11.0 31.5 1.5 4.5 3.5 4.5 6.5
25 Feb 2019 Euromedia 800 18.6 21.8 11.0 34.6 1.9 4.7 3.7 3.7 12.8
20–25 Feb 2019 SWG 1,500 18.5 22.6 8.7 33.2 3.0 4.3 3.1 2.3 1.0 4.3 10.6
19 Feb 2019 EMG 1,802 17.9 24.8 10.3 30.7 5.2 3.0 1.6 6.5 5.9
19 Feb 2019 Noto 18.0 21.0 11.0 35.0 2.0 4.0 3.5 1.0 4.5 14.0
13–18 Feb 2019 SWG 1,500 18.6 22.1 9.0 33.4 2.9 4.5 2.9 2.2 1.2 3.2 11.3
13–15 Feb 2019 Quorum – YouTrend 1,003 18.0 24.3 10.3 32.9 5.1 9.4 8.6
12 Feb 2019 EMG 18.0 24.6 9.5 31.4 4.9 3.0 2.0 6.6 6.8
12 Feb 2019 Piepoli 500 18.0 27.5 10.0 31.0 2.0 5.0 3.5 3.5 3.5
12 Feb 2019 Euromedia 800 18.3 23.5 10.8 34.5 1.8 5.0 3.5 2.6 11.0
12 Feb 2019 Noto 19.0 22.0 10.0 34.0 2.0 4.5 3.5 1.5 3.5 12.0
6–11 Feb 2019 SWG 1,500 17.5 23.3 8.5 33.8 2.7 4.6 3.1 2.4 1.0 3.1 10.5
6–7 Feb 2019 Ipsos 1,000 16.1 25.4 8.1 34.4 2.2 3.6 4.2 6.0 9.0
6 Feb 2019 Noto 19.0 24.0 9.0 33.0 2.0 4.5 3.0 1.5 3.5 9.0
2–6 Feb 2019 Bidimedia 1,113 18.2 24.0 8.4 32.5 3.8 3.5 3.7 5.9 8.5
5 Feb 2019 EMG 1,803 18.7 25.1 9.7 30.1 4.5 3.0 2.0 6.9 5.0
30 Jan–4 Feb 2019 SWG 1,500 16.8 24.0 8.3 33.8 2.9 4.3 3.1 2.5 1.0 3.3 9.8
29 Jan 2019 EMG 1,786 18.2 25.8 9.2 30.3 4.5 3.0 1.9 7.1 4.5
29 Jan 2019 Piepoli 503 18.0 28.0 9.5 31.0 2.5 5.0 4.0 1.5 3.0
29 Jan 2019 Euromedia 800 16.1 24.2 10.0 33.7 1.4 5.1 3.1 6.3 9.5
28 Jan 2019 Quorum 1,000 19.1 26.6 9.6 30.9 5.0 8.8 4.3
23–28 Jan 2019 SWG 1,500 17.2 24.9 8.1 32.6 2.6 4.5 2.9 2.4 1.2 3.6 7.7
22 Jan 2019 EMG 1,801 17.9 26.5 8.9 30.1 4.7 2.6 2.1 7.2 3.6
16–21 Jan 2019 SWG 1,500 17.9 25.7 8.6 31.5 2.8 4.4 3.0 2.3 3.8 5.8
15–17 Jan 2019 Ipsos 1,000 17.3 25.4 7.1 35.8 3.4 3.5 7.5 10.4
15 Jan 2019 EMG 1,794 18.5 26.6 8.8 30.6 4.4 2.1 1.8 7.2 4.0
9–14 Jan 2019 SWG 1,500 17.3 25.2 8.2 32.2 3.1 4.2 3.2 2.5 4.1 7.0
7–10 Jan 2019 BiDiMedia 1,096 18.0 24.2 8.3 32.3 4.2 3.8 3.6 5.6 8.1
8 Jan 2019 EMG 1,540 19.1 26.1 8.3 31.0 4.1 2.0 2.0 7.4 4.9
3–7 Jan 2019 SWG 1,500 17.3 26.3 8.3 32.2 2.8 3.8 2.9 2.2 4.2 5.9
17–21 Dec 2018 BiDiMedia 1,018 16.8 24.8 7.3 33.7 1.4 3.8 4.2 4.0 4.0 8.9
18 Dec 2018 EMG 1,611 18.0 27.9 8.5 31.4 4.1 2.1 1.9 6.1 3.5
12–17 Dec 2018 SWG 1,500 16.8 26.5 8.0 33.0 2.3 4.0 2.8 2.4 4.2 6.5
11 Dec 2018 EMG 1,803 17.7 26.4 8.4 32.1 4.0 2.2 2.0 7.2 5.7
5–10 Dec 2018 SWG 1,500 17.5 26.2 8.7 32.0 2.3 3.7 3.0 2.4 4.2 5.8
3–6 Dec 2018 Twig 1,000 17.5 26.9 10.1 31.8 2.8 2.7 8.2 4.9
4 Dec 2018 EMG 1,784 18.5 25.7 8.2 32.1 4.0 2.2 2.1 7.0 6.4
28 Nov–3 Dec 2018 SWG 1,500 17.6 27.3 8.2 32.0 2.4 3.3 2.8 2.4 4.0 4.7
28 Nov 2018 Noto 18.0 25.0 9.5 34.0 2.0 4.0 2.5 2.0 6.0 9.0
27 Nov 2018 EMG 1,803 18.5 25.9 8.3 32.0 4.0 2.1 2.0 7.2 6.1
25 Nov 2018 Noto 17.0 25.0 9.0 33.0 2.0 3.5 2.5 2.0 6.0 8.0
19–22 Nov 2018 BiDiMedia 1,081 17.4 26.1 7.3 32.9 1.4 4.2 3.4 3.3 4.0 6.8
25 May 2014 Election results 40.8 21.2 16.8 6.2 3.7 11.3 19.6
  1. ^ In the 2018 Italian general election LeU was a joint list, mainly comprising Article One and SI. Some polls have included MDP or SI or both, sometimes together, instead of LeU. Since April 2019 some polls started to track SI along with PRC and MDP separately. MDP finally chose to run with PD.
  2. ^ In the 2018 Italian general election PaP was a joint list, including PRC and PCI, which left the alliance a few months later. Some polls have included these two parties within PaP and/or CP. In March 2019 CP's leader Luigi de Magistris announced it would not participate in the election. In April PaP decided not to run in the election.
  3. ^ Until March 2019 the results refer to the proposed joint list formed by FdV, IiC (which finally decided to side with +E) and GI, since April to EV, joint list of FdV, P and GI.
  4. ^ did not exist

ResultsEdit

Summary of 26 May 2019 European Parliament election results in Italy →
Party European party Main candidate Votes % +/− Seats +/−
Democratic Party PES TBD
0 / 76
Five Star Movement None TBD
0 / 76
Forza Italia EPP TBD
0 / 76
League MENF TBD
0 / 76
The People of FamilyAP EPP TBD
0 / 76
The Left GUE TBD
0 / 76
Brothers of Italy ECR TBD
0 / 76
Green Europe Greens TBD
0 / 76
More Europe ALDE TBD
0 / 76
South Tyrolean People's Party[49] EPP TBD
0 / 73
Autonomies for Europe[50] EFA TBD
0 / 73
Pirate Party PPEU TBD new
0 / 73
new
CasaPound–United Rights AENM TBD new
0 / 76
new
Populars for Italy EPP TBD new
0 / 76
new
New Force APF TBD new
0 / 76
new
Communist Party INITIATIVE TBD new
0 / 73
new
Animalist List None TBD new
0 / 73
new
Valid votes
Blank and Invalid votes
Totals 100.00
Electorate and voter turnout 0
Source: Ministry of the Interior

ReferencesEdit

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  11. ^ Il simbolo c'è, l'intesa con MDP quasi
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  23. ^ Elezioni Europee, le liste e i candidati all'Europarlamento
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  50. ^ List connected with the Democratic Party