2018 in amphibian paleontology

This list of fossil amphibians described in 2018 is a list of new taxa of fossil amphibians that were described during the year 2018, as well as other significant discoveries and events related to amphibian paleontology that occurred in 2018.

List of years in amphibian paleontology
In paleontology
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
+...

New taxaEdit

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Type locality Country Notes

Andersonerpeton[1]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Pardo & Mann

Carboniferous (Bashkirian)

Joggins Formation

  Canada
(  Nova Scotia)

A member of Aistopoda. The type species is "Hylerpeton" longidentatum Dawson (1876).

Electrorana[2]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Xing et al.

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian)

Burmese amber

  Myanmar

A frog of uncertain phylogenetic placement, possibly a member of Alytoidea. The type species is E. limoae.

Enosuchus alveolatus[3]

Sp. nov

Valid

Bulanov & Golubev

Late Permian

  Russia
(  Mari El)

Kitiakia[3]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Bulanov & Golubev

Middle Permian

Belebei Formation

  Russia
(  Kirov Oblast)

A relative of Enosuchus. Genus includes new species K. firma.

Kulgeriherpeton[4]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Skutschas et al.

Early Cretaceous (BerriasianBarremian)

Batylykh Formation

  Russia

A stem-salamander. The type species is K. ultimus.

Laosuchus[5]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Arbez, Sidor & Steyer

Permian–Triassic boundary

Luang Prabang Basin

  Laos

A chroniosuchian. Genus includes new species L. naga.

Latonia caucasica[6]

Sp. nov

Valid

Syromyatnikova & Roček

Late Miocene (early Turolian)

  Russia
(  Adygea)

A species of Latonia.

Mengbatrachus[7]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Tan et al.

Early Cretaceous

Longjiang Group

  China

An early anuran. The type species is M. moqi.

Mesanerpeton[8]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Smithson & Clack

Carboniferous (Tournaisian)

Ballagan Formation

  United Kingdom

An early tetrapod. The type species is M. woodi.

Mioproteus gardneri[9]

Sp. nov

Valid

Venczel & Codrea

Early Oligocene

  Romania

A member of the family Proteidae.

Nooxobeia[10]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Gee, Scott & Reisz

Permian (Guadalupian?)

  United States
(  Oklahoma)

A dissorophid temnospondyl. The type species is N. gracilis.

Shirerpeton[11]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Matsumoto & Evans

Early Cretaceous (Barremian)

Kuwajima Formation

  Japan

A member of the family Albanerpetontidae. The type species is S. isajii.

Tantallognathus[12]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Chen et al.

Carboniferous (late Tournaisian or earliest Viséan)

Ballagan Formation

  United Kingdom

An early tetrapod of uncertain phylogenetic placement. The type species is T. woodi.

Tutusius[13]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Gess & Ahlberg

Devonian (late Famennian)

Witpoort Formation

  South Africa

An early tetrapod. The type species is T. umlambo.

Umzantsia[13]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Gess & Ahlberg

Devonian (late Famennian)

Witpoort Formation

  South Africa

An early tetrapod. The type species is U. amazana.


General researchEdit

  • Evidence from multi-stable isotope data indicating that some Devonian vertebrates, including early tetrapods, were euryhaline and inhabited aquatic environments subject to rapid changes in salinity is presented by Goedert et al. (2018).[14]
  • A study on the evolution of hindlimb musculature from the lobe-finned fishes to early tetrapods is published online by Molnar et al. (2018).[15]
  • A partial jaw resembling that of Crassigyrinus is described from the Tournaisian of Scotland by Clack, Porro & Bennett (2018), potentially extending the existence of the genus by approximately 20 million years towards the base of the Carboniferous.[16]
  • A study on the fossil record of amphibians, aiming to identify traits that influenced the extinction risk of species, and using this data to predict the extinction risk for living amphibian species, is published by Tietje & Rödel (2018).[17]
  • Description of anamniote tetrapod fossils from the Late Permian Sundyr Tetrapod Assemblage (Mari El, Russia) is published by Golubev & Bulanov (2018).[18]
  • A study on the relationship between taxonomic and ecological diversity of temnospondyls across the PermianTriassic boundary in the Karoo Basin of South Africa is published by Tarailo (2018).[19]
  • A study on the morphology and phylogenetic relationships of Neldasaurus is published by Schoch (2018).[20]
  • A study on the morphological changes in the skull that have been considered related to size reduction in dissorophoids, evaluating whether these changes are consistent with the consequences of miniaturization according to the studies in extant miniature amphibians, is published by Pérez-Ben, Schoch & Báez (2018).[21]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of dissorophoid temnospondyls, and on their relationship to modern amphibians, is published by Schoch (2018), who names new taxon Amphibamiformes.[22]
  • Well-preserved postcranial skeletons of two dissorophids are described from the early Permian karst deposits near Richards Spur (Oklahoma, United States) by Gee & Reisz (2018).[23]
  • A revision of the fossil material assigned to Fayella chickashaensis is published by Gee, Scott & Reisz (2018), who consider this species to be a nomen dubium.[10]
  • Redescription of the holotype specimen of the dissorophid species Alegeinosaurus aphthitos is published by Gee (2018), who considers Alegeinosaurus to be a junior synonym of Aspidosaurus.[24]
  • New skull remains of Cacops morrisi, as well as the first known postcranial remains of the taxon, are described from the Permian of the Richards Spur locality (Oklahoma, United States) by Gee & Reisz (2018).[25]
  • Two new dissorophid specimens referred to Anakamacops petrolicus are described from the Guadalupian Dashankou Fauna of China by Liu (2018).[26]
  • A study on the morphology and phylogenetic relationships of Limnogyrinus elegans is published by Schoch & Witzmann (2018).[27]
  • A study on the diversity of the morphology of the feeding system in stereospondyl temnospondyls is published by Penrice & Deeming (2018).[28]
  • A study on the anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of Parotosuchus nasutus is published by Schoch (2018).[29]
  • A study on the morphology of specimens of Rhytidosteus from southeastern European Russia, and on their implications for inferring possible feeding adaptations of this animal, is published by Sennikov & Novikov (2018).[30]
  • Partial mandible of a large-bodied metoposaurid is described from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation exposures at Petrified Forest National Park (Arizona, United States) by Gee & Parker (2018).[31]
  • Morphological description of two new small-bodied metoposaurid specimens from Petrified Forest National Park (Arizona, United States) and a histological analysis of the vertebra of these specimens is published online by Gee & Parker (2018), who argue that their findings support the interpretation of Apachesaurus as a juvenile metoposaurid.[32]
  • A small metoposaurid specimen interpreted as a juvenile specimen of Apachesaurus gregorii is described from the Petrified Forest National Park (Arizona, United States) by Rinehart & Lucas (2018).[33]
  • A study on the histology of the humeri of members of the species Metoposaurus krasiejowensis, revealing the occurrence of two different growth patterns (histotypes), is published by Teschner, Sander & Konietzko-Meier (2018).[34]
  • A study on the feeding mode of Metoposaurus krasiejowensis as indicated by bone microstructure and computational biomechanics is published by Konietzko-Meier et al. (2018).[35]
  • Description of the ornamentation of clavicles and skull bones of Metoposaurus krasiejowensis is published by Antczak & Bodzioch (2018).[36]
  • Redescription of Regalerpeton weichangensis based on eight new specimens and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of the species is published by Rong (2018).[37]
  • An incomplete vertebra of a member of Caudata is described from the Algerian part of the Cretaceous Kem Kem Beds by Alloul et al. (2018).[38]
  • Description of bone anomalies in specimens of the cryptobranchid Eoscapherpeton asiaticum from the Upper Cretaceous Bissekty Formation (Uzbekistan) and a study on their possible origin is published by Skutschas et al. (2018).[39]
  • A study on the life history of the cryptobranchid Aviturus exsecratus from the Paleocene of Mongolia is published online by Skutschas et al. (2018).[40]
  • Description of new specimens of the fossil salamandrids Taricha oligocenica and Taricha lindoei from the Oligocene of Oregon, providing new information on the morphology of these taxa, and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of these species is published by Jacisin & Hopkins (2018).[41]
  • Cretaceous frog tracks are described from the Saok Island (South Korea) by Park et al. (2018), who name a new ichnotaxon Ranipes saokensis.[42]
  • Fossils of members of the genus Palaeobatrachus are described from the Miocene (Turolian) localities in Adygea (Russia) by Syromyatnikova (2018).[43]
  • A redescription and a study of the phylogenetic relationships of Baurubatrachus pricei is published by Báez & Gómez (2018).[44]
  • A redescription and a study of the phylogenetic relationships of Eorubeta nevadensis is published by Henrici et al. (2018).[45]
  • Description of new fossil material of Thaumastosaurus from three localities in Switzerland, and a revision of the stratigraphic records of the genus Thaumastosaurus and other ranoid fossils from the Eocene of Europe, is published by Vasilyan (2018).[46]
  • A study on the skull morphology of Enosuchus breviceps is published by Bulanov & Golubev (2018).[47]
  • A study on the anatomy of regenerating tails in two specimens of the Carboniferous lepospondyl Microbrachis pelikani, comparing tail regeneration in this taxon and in extant seal salamander and Ocoee salamander, is published by van der Vos, Witzmann & Fröbisch (2018).[48]
  • A study on the skull ornamentation of a large specimen of Brachydectes newberryi from Linton (Ohio, United States) is published by Mann (2018).[49]
  • Description of the anatomy of the skeleton of the chroniosuchian species Bystrowiella schumanni and a study on the phylogenetic relationships of chroniosuchians is published by Witzmann & Schoch (2018).[50]
  • A study on the variation of digit proportions and trackway parameters in diadectomorph tracks with a relatively short pedal digit V, representing ichnogenus Ichniotherium, is published by Buchwitz & Voight (2018).[51]


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jason D. Pardo; Arjan Mann (2018). "A basal aïstopod from the earliest Pennsylvanian of Canada, and the antiquity of the first limbless tetrapod lineage". Royal Society Open Science. 5 (12): 181056. doi:10.1098/rsos.181056. PMC 6304130. PMID 30662726.
  2. ^ Lida Xing; Edward L. Stanley; Ming Bai; David C. Blackburn (2018). "The earliest direct evidence of frogs in wet tropical forests from Cretaceous Burmese amber". Scientific Reports. 8 (1): Article number: 8770. Bibcode:2018NatSR...8.8770X. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-26848-w. PMC 6002357. PMID 29904068.
  3. ^ a b V. V. Bulanov; V. K. Golubev (2018). "New data on enosuchid anthracosauromorphs (Amphibia) of the Middle–Late Permian of European Russia: Part 2. New taxa of Enosuchidae". Paleontological Journal. 52 (13): 1623–1632. doi:10.1134/S0031030118130038. S2CID 91872887.
  4. ^ Pavel P. Skutschas; Veniamin V. Kolchanov; Alexander O. Averianov; Thomas Martin; Rico Schellhorn; Petr N. Kolosov; Dmitry D. Vitenko (2018). "A new relict stem salamander from the Early Cretaceous of Yakutia, Siberian Russia". Acta Palaeontologica Polonica. 63 (3): 519–525. doi:10.4202/app.00498.2018.
  5. ^ Thomas Arbez; Christian A. Sidor; J.-Sébastien Steyer (2018). "Laosuchus naga gen. et sp. nov., a new chroniosuchian from South-East Asia (Laos) with internal structures revealed by micro-CT scan and discussion of its palaeobiology" (PDF). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 17 (14): 945–962. doi:10.1080/14772019.2018.1504827. S2CID 91670454.
  6. ^ Elena Syromyatnikova; Zbyněk Roček (2018). "New Latonia (Amphibia: Alytidae) from the late Miocene of northern Caucasus (Russia)". Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. 99 (3): 495–509. doi:10.1007/s12549-018-0350-3. S2CID 135261476.
  7. ^ Kai Tan; Liwu Lu; Xiaoyun Chen; Yuegao Jin (2018). "A new Early Cretaceous anuran amphibian from Northeast China". Geological Bulletin of China. 37 (10): 1783–1788.
  8. ^ Timothy R. Smithson; Jennifer A. Clack (2018). "A new tetrapod from Romer's Gap reveals an early adaptation for walking". Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 108 (1): 89–97. doi:10.1017/S1755691018000075. S2CID 232149117.
  9. ^ Márton Venczel; Vlad A. Codrea (2018). "A new proteid salamander from the early Oligocene of Romania with notes on the paleobiogeography of Eurasian proteids". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 38 (5): e1508027. doi:10.1080/02724634.2018.1508027. S2CID 92039476.
  10. ^ a b Bryan M. Gee; Diane Scott; Robert R. Reisz (2018). "Reappraisal of the Permian dissorophid Fayella chickashaensis". Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. 55 (10): 1103–1114. Bibcode:2018CaJES..55.1103G. doi:10.1139/cjes-2018-0053.
  11. ^ Ryoko Matsumoto; Susan E. Evans (2018). "The first record of albanerpetontid amphibians (Amphibia: Albanerpetontidae) from East Asia". PLOS ONE. 13 (1): e0189767. Bibcode:2018PLoSO..1389767M. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0189767. PMC 5752013. PMID 29298317.
  12. ^ Donglei Chen; Yasaman Alavi; Martin D. Brazeau; Henning Blom; David Millward; Per E. Ahlberg (2018). "A partial lower jaw of a tetrapod from "Romer's Gap"". Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 108 (1): 55–65. doi:10.1017/S1755691018000099. S2CID 135127547.
  13. ^ a b Robert Gess; Per Erik Ahlberg (2018). "A tetrapod fauna from within the Devonian Antarctic Circle". Science. 360 (6393): 1120–1124. Bibcode:2018Sci...360.1120G. doi:10.1126/science.aaq1645. PMID 29880689. S2CID 46965541.
  14. ^ Jean Goedert; Christophe Lécuyer; Romain Amiot; Florent Arnaud-Godet; Xu Wang; Linlin Cui; Gilles Cuny; Guillaume Douay; François Fourel; Gérard Panczer; Laurent Simon; J.-Sébastien Steyer; Min Zhu (2018). "Euryhaline ecology of early tetrapods revealed by stable isotopes". Nature. 558 (7708): 68–72. Bibcode:2018Natur.558...68G. doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0159-2. PMID 29849142. S2CID 44085982.
  15. ^ Julia L. Molnar; Rui Diogo; John R. Hutchinson; Stephanie E. Pierce (2018). "Evolution of hindlimb muscle anatomy across the tetrapod water‐to‐land transition, including comparisons with forelimb anatomy" (PDF). The Anatomical Record. 303 (2): 218–234. doi:10.1002/ar.23997. PMID 30365249. S2CID 53097838.
  16. ^ Jennifer A. Clack; Laura B. Porro; Carys E. Bennett (2018). "A Crassigyrinus-like jaw from the Tournaisian (Early Mississippian) of Scotland" (PDF). Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 108 (1): 37–46. doi:10.1017/S1755691018000087. S2CID 220421588.
  17. ^ Melanie Tietje; Mark‐Oliver Rödel (2018). "Evaluating the predicted extinction risk of living amphibian species with the fossil record". Ecology Letters. 21 (8): 1135–1142. doi:10.1111/ele.13080. PMID 29790283.
  18. ^ V. K. Golubev; V. V. Bulanov (2018). "Amphibians of the Permian Sundyr Tetrapod Assemblage of Eastern Europe". Paleontological Journal. 52 (6): 639–652. doi:10.1134/S0031030118060059. S2CID 92109377.
  19. ^ David A. Tarailo (2018). "Taxonomic and ecomorphological diversity of temnospondyl amphibians across the Permian–Triassic boundary in the Karoo Basin (South Africa)". Journal of Morphology. 279 (12): 1840–1848. doi:10.1002/jmor.20906. PMID 30397933. S2CID 53234826.
  20. ^ Rainer R. Schoch (2018). "Osteology of the temnospondyl Neldasaurus and the evolution of basal dvinosaurians". Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen. 287 (1): 1–16. doi:10.1127/njgpa/2018/0700.
  21. ^ Celeste M. Pérez-Ben; Rainer R. Schoch; Ana M. Báez (2018). "Miniaturization and morphological evolution in Paleozoic relatives of living amphibians: a quantitative approach". Paleobiology. 44 (1): 58–75. doi:10.1017/pab.2017.22. S2CID 89701744.
  22. ^ Rainer R. Schoch (2019). "The putative lissamphibian stem-group: phylogeny and evolution of the dissorophoid temnospondyls". Journal of Paleontology. 93 (1): 137–156. doi:10.1017/jpa.2018.67. S2CID 134075457.
  23. ^ Bryan M. Gee; Robert R. Reisz (2018). "Postcrania of large dissorophid temnospondyls from Richards Spur, Oklahoma". Fossil Record. 21 (1): 79–91. doi:10.5194/fr-21-79-2018.
  24. ^ Bryan M. Gee (2018). "Reappraisal of the early Permian dissorophid Alegeinosaurus from Texas, USA". PalZ. 92 (4): 661–669. doi:10.1007/s12542-018-0421-9. S2CID 89844574.
  25. ^ Bryan M. Gee; Robert R. Reisz (2018). "Cranial and postcranial anatomy of Cacops morrisi, a eucacopine dissorophid from the early Permian of Oklahoma". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 38 (2): e1433186. doi:10.1080/02724634.2018.1433186. S2CID 90120528.
  26. ^ Jun Liu (2018). "Osteology of the large dissorophid temnospondyl Anakamacops petrolicus from the Guadalupian Dashankou Fauna of China". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 38 (5): e1513407. doi:10.1080/02724634.2018.1513407. S2CID 92483721.
  27. ^ Rainer R. Schoch; Florian Witzmann (2018). "Morphology of the Late Carboniferous temnospondyl Limnogyrinus elegans, and the evolutionary history of the Micromelerpetidae". Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen. 289 (3): 293–310. doi:10.1127/njgpa/2018/0762.
  28. ^ Samantha C. Penrice; D. Charles Deeming (2018). "Morphometrics of feeding anatomy in stereospondyl amphibians". Australasian Palaeontological Memoirs. 51: 131–140. ISSN 2205-8877.
  29. ^ Rainer R. Schoch (2018). "The temnospondyl Parotosuchus nasutus (v. Meyer, 1858) from the Early Triassic Middle Buntsandstein of Germany". Palaeodiversity. 11 (1): 107–126. doi:10.18476/pale.11.a6. S2CID 134538665.
  30. ^ A. G. Sennikov; I. V. Novikov (2018). "On possible trophic adaptations of some Rhytidosteidae (Amphibia, Temnospondyli)". Paleontological Journal. 52 (12): 1412–1418. doi:10.1134/S0031030118120171. S2CID 92039860.
  31. ^ Bryan M. Gee; William G. Parker (2018). "A large-bodied metoposaurid from the Revueltian (late Norian) of Petrified Forest National Park (Arizona, USA)". Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie - Abhandlungen. 287 (1): 61–73. doi:10.1127/njgpa/2018/0706.
  32. ^ Bryan M. Gee; William G. Parker (2018). "Morphological and histological description of small metoposaurids from Petrified Forest National Park, AZ, USA and the taxonomy of Apachesaurus". Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology. 32 (2): 203–233. doi:10.1080/08912963.2018.1480616. S2CID 89662443.
  33. ^ Larry F. Rinehart; Spencer G. Lucas (2018). "Description of a juvenile specimen of the Late Triassic amphibian Apachesaurus gregorii: developmental and relative growth". New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin. 79: 565–583.
  34. ^ Elżbieta M. Teschner; P. Martin Sander; Dorota Konietzko-Meier (2018). "Variability of growth pattern observed in Metoposaurus krasiejowensis humeri and its biological meaning". Journal of Iberian Geology. 44 (1): 99–111. doi:10.1007/s41513-017-0038-y. S2CID 91104888.
  35. ^ Dorota Konietzko-Meier; Kamil Gruntmejer; Jordi Marcé-Nogué; Adam Bodzioch; Josep Fortuny (2018). "Merging cranial histology and 3D-computational biomechanics: a review of the feeding ecology of a Late Triassic temnospondyl amphibian". PeerJ. 6: e4426. doi:10.7717/peerj.4426. PMC 5831156. PMID 29503770.
  36. ^ Mateusz Antczak; Adam Bodzioch (2018). "Ornamentation of dermal bones of Metoposaurus krasiejowensis and its ecological implications". PeerJ. 6: e5267. doi:10.7717/peerj.5267. PMC 6074752. PMID 30083441.
  37. ^ Yu-Fen Rong (2018). "Restudy of Regalerpeton weichangensis (Amphibia: Urodela) from the Lower Cretaceous of Hebei, China". Vertebrata PalAsiatica. 56 (2): 121–136. doi:10.19615/j.cnki.1000-3118.170627.
  38. ^ Tannina Alloul; Jean-Claude Rage; Rachid Hamdidouche; Nour-Eddine Jalil (2018). "First report on Cretaceous vertebrates from the Algerian Kem Kem beds. A new procoelous salamander from the Cenomanian, with remarks on African Caudata" (PDF). Cretaceous Research. 84: 384–388. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2017.11.019.
  39. ^ Pavel Skutschas; Veniamin Kolchanov; Elizaveta Boitsova; Ivan Kuzmin (2018). "Osseous anomalies of the cryptobranchid Eoscapherpeton asiaticum (Amphibia: Caudata) from the Late Cretaceous of Uzbekistan". Fossil Record. 21 (1): 159–169. doi:10.5194/fr-21-159-2018.
  40. ^ Pavel P. Skutschas; Veniamin V. Kolchanov; Valeriy V. Bulanov; Andrey G. Sennikov; Elizaveta A. Boitsova; Valeriy K. Golubev; Elena V. Syromyatnikova (2018). "Reconstruction of the life history traits in the giant salamander Aviturus exsecratus (Caudata, Cryptobranchidae) from the Paleocene of Mongolia using zygapophyseal skeletochronology". Historical Biology: An International Journal of Paleobiology. 32 (5): 645–648. doi:10.1080/08912963.2018.1523157. S2CID 91794648.
  41. ^ John J. Jacisin; Samantha S.B. Hopkins (2018). "A redescription and phylogenetic analysis based on new material of the fossil newts Taricha oligocenica Van Frank, 1955 and Taricha lindoei Naylor, 1979 (Amphibia, Salamandridae) from the Oligocene of Oregon". Journal of Paleontology. 92 (4): 713–733. doi:10.1017/jpa.2017.85. S2CID 134211581.
  42. ^ Won Mi Park; Martin G. Lockley; Jeong Yul Kim; Kyung Soo Kim (2018). "Anuran (frog) trackways from the Cretaceous of Korea". Cretaceous Research. 86: 135–148. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2018.02.002.
  43. ^ Elena V. Syromyatnikova (2018). "Palaeobatrachid frog from the late Miocene of Northern Caucasus, Russia". Palaeontologia Electronica. 21 (2): Article number 21.2.30A. doi:10.26879/861.
  44. ^ Ana María Báez; Raúl Orencio Gómez (2018). "Dealing with homoplasy: osteology and phylogenetic relationships of the bizarre neobatrachian frog Baurubatrachus pricei from the Upper Cretaceous of Brazil". Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 16 (4): 279–308. doi:10.1080/14772019.2017.1287130. S2CID 133862112.
  45. ^ Amy C. Henrici; Peter Druschke; Richard P. Hilton; Joshua W. Bonde (2018). "Redescription and phylogenetic reassessment of the enigmatic anuran Eorubeta nevadensis (Amphibia) based on new specimens from ?latest Cretaceous–Paleocene beds of the Sheep Pass Formation, Nevada". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 38 (5): e1510413. doi:10.1080/02724634.2018.1510413. S2CID 91257281.
  46. ^ Davit Vasilyan (2018). "Eocene Western European endemic genus Thaumastosaurus: new insights into the question "Are the Ranidae known prior to the Oligocene?"". PeerJ. 6: e5511. doi:10.7717/peerj.5511. PMC 6118198. PMID 30186689.
  47. ^ V. V. Bulanov; V. K. Golubev (2018). "New data on enosuchid anthracosauromorphs (Amphibia) of the Middle–Late Permian of European Russia: Part 1. Morphology of Enosuchus breviceps Konzhukova, 1955". Paleontological Journal. 52 (12): 1419–1427. doi:10.1134/S0031030118120080. S2CID 91833472.
  48. ^ W. van der Vos; F. Witzmann; N. B. Fröbisch (2018). "Tail regeneration in the Paleozoic tetrapod Microbrachis pelikani and comparison with extant salamanders and squamates". Journal of Zoology. 304 (1): 34–44. doi:10.1111/jzo.12516.
  49. ^ Arjan Mann (2018). "Cranial ornamentation of a large Brachydectes newberryi (Recumbirostra: Molgophidae) from Linton, Ohio, and effects of ontogeny on skull ornamentation in recumbirostrans". Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology. 6: 91–96. doi:10.18435/vamp29341.
  50. ^ Florian Witzmann; Rainer R. Schoch (2018). "Skull and postcranium of the bystrowianid Bystrowiella schumanni from the Middle Triassic of Germany, and the position of chroniosuchians within Tetrapoda". Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 16 (9): 711–739. doi:10.1080/14772019.2017.1336579. S2CID 90784937.
  51. ^ Michael Buchwitz; Sebastian Voigt (2018). "On the morphological variability of Ichniotherium tracks and evolution of locomotion in the sistergroup of amniotes". PeerJ. 6: e4346. doi:10.7717/peerj.4346. PMC 5797465. PMID 29404225.