Open main menu

(523719) 2014 LM28

  (Redirected from 2014 LM28)

(523719) 2014 LM28, provisional designation 2014 LM28, is a trans-Neptunian object and centaur, approximately 46 kilometers (29 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 16 May 2013, by the Pan-STARRS 1 survey at Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, United States.[1] The object's orbit is highly inclined and very eccentric, with a perihelion closer to the Sun than Uranus and at an aphelion 17 times farther from the Sun than Neptune.

(523719) 2014 LM28
Discovery [1]
Discovered byPan-STARRS 1
Discovery siteHaleakala Obs.
Discovery date16 May 2013
Designations
MPC designation(523719) 2014 LM28
TNO[2] · distant[1]
centaur[3]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 27 April 2019 (JD 2458600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 1
Observation arc4.04 yr (1,474 d)
Aphelion538.89 AU
Perihelion16.771 AU
277.83 AU
Eccentricity0.9396
4631.05 yr (1,691,491 d)
0.1133°
0° 0m 0.72s / day
Inclination84.739°
246.18°
38.364°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
46 km[3]
9.9[1][2]

Contents

Orbit and classificationEdit

2014 LM28 orbits the Sun at a distance of 16.8–538.9 AU once every 4631 years and 1 month (1,691,491 days; semi-major axis of 277.83 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.94 and an inclination of 85° with respect to the ecliptic.[2] The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation by Pan-STARRS at Haleakala Observatory in May 2013.[1]

Numbering and namingEdit

This minor planet was numbered by the Minor Planet Center on 25 September 2018 (M.P.C. 111779).[4] As of 2018, it has not been named.[1]

FeaturesEdit

2014 LM28 has a highly inclined orbit typical of scattered objects and orbits nearly perpendicular to the ecliptic.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "523719 (2014 LM28)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 8 October 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 523719 (2014 LM28)" (2017-05-29 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 8 October 2018.
  3. ^ a b "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. 22 July 2017. Retrieved 2 August 2017.
  4. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 8 October 2018.

External linksEdit