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2013 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Tournament

The 2013 NCAA Men's Division I Ice Hockey Tournament was the national championship tournament for men's college ice hockey in the United States in 2013. The tournament involved 16 teams in single-elimination play to determine the national champion at the Division I level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the highest level of competition in college hockey. The tournament's Frozen Four – the semifinals and finals – was hosted by Robert Morris University at the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh.[1] Robert Morris' bid to host was co-sponsored by VisitPittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Penguins.[2]

2013 NCAA Men's Division I
Ice Hockey Tournament
2013 Frozen Four.jpg
2013 Frozen Four logo
Teams16
Finals site
ChampionsYale Bulldogs (1st title)
Runner-upQuinnipiac Bobcats (1st title game)
Semifinalists
Winning coachKeith Allain (1st title)
MOPAndrew Miller Yale
Attendance35,612

Yale defeated Quinnipiac 4–0 in the championship game to win the program's first NCAA title.

Tournament procedureEdit

 
Providence
Grand Rapids
Toledo
Manchester
Pittsburgh
2013 Regionals (blue) and Frozen Four (red)

The tournament will consist of four groups of four teams in regional brackets. The four regionals are officially named after their geographic areas. The following are the sites for the 2013 regionals:[3][4]

March 29 and 30
Northeast Regional, Verizon Wireless ArenaManchester, New Hampshire (Host: University of New Hampshire)
West Regional, Van Andel ArenaGrand Rapids, Michigan (Host: University of Michigan)
March 30 and 31
East Regional, Dunkin' Donuts CenterProvidence, Rhode Island (Host: Brown University)
Midwest Regional, Huntington CenterToledo, Ohio (Host: Bowling Green State University)

The winner of each regional will advance to the Frozen Four:

April 11 and 13
Consol Energy CenterPittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Host: Robert Morris University)

Qualifying teamsEdit

The at-large bids and seeding for each team in the tournament were announced on March 24.[5] The Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA) had six teams receive a berth in the tournament, ECAC Hockey and Hockey East each had three teams receive a berth, and the Central Collegiate Hockey Association (CCHA) and Atlantic Hockey each had two teams receive a berth.

East Regional – Providence Midwest Regional – Toledo
Seed School Conference Record Berth type Seed School Conference Record Berth type
1 Quinnipiac (1) ECAC Hockey 27–7–5 At-large bid 1 Notre Dame (4) CCHA 25–12–3 Tournament champion
2 Boston College Hockey East 22–11–4 At-large bid 2 Miami CCHA 24–11–5 At-large bid
3 Union ECAC Hockey 21–12–5 Tournament champion 3 Minnesota State WCHA 24–13–3 At-large bid
4 Canisius Atlantic Hockey 19–18–5 Tournament champion 4 St. Cloud State WCHA 23–15–1 At-large bid
West Regional – Grand Rapids Northeast Regional – Manchester
Seed School Conference Record Berth type Seed School Conference Record Berth type
1 Minnesota (2) WCHA 26–8–5 At-large bid 1 Massachusetts–Lowell (3) Hockey East 26–10–2 Tournament champion
2 North Dakota WCHA 21–12–7 At-large bid 2 New Hampshire Hockey East 19–11–7 At-large bid
3 Niagara Atlantic Hockey 23–9–5 At-large bid 3 Denver WCHA 20–13–5 At-large bid
4 Yale ECAC Hockey 21–10–7 At-large bid 4 Wisconsin WCHA 22–12–7 Tournament champion

Number in parentheses denotes overall seed in the tournament.

RegionalsEdit

East Regional – Providence, Rhode IslandEdit

Regional semifinals
March 30
Regional final
March 31
      
1 Quinnipiac (1) 4
4 Canisius 3
1 Quinnipiac 5
3 Union 1
3 Union 5
2 Boston College 1

Note: * denotes overtime period(s)
All times are local (UTC−4).

Regional semifinalsEdit

March 30, 2013
5:30 pm
ESPN3
(4) Canisius3–4
(0–1, 2–0, 1–3)
(1) QuinnipiacDunkin' Donuts Center, Providence
Attendance: 6253
March 30, 2013
9:00 pm
ESPNU
(3) Union5–1
(1–0, 3–0, 1–1)
(2) Boston CollegeDunkin' Donuts Center, Providence
Attendance: 6253

Regional finalEdit

March 31, 2013
6:30 pm
ESPNU
(3) Union1–5
(0–3, 0–2, 1–0)
(1) QuinnipiacDunkin' Donuts Center, Providence
Attendance: 5007


West Regional – Grand Rapids, MichiganEdit

Regional semifinals
March 29
Regional final
March 30
      
1 Minnesota (2) 2
4 Yale 3*
4 Yale 4
2 North Dakota 1
3 Niagara 1
2 North Dakota 2

Note: * denotes overtime period(s)
All times are local (UTC−4).

Regional semifinalsEdit

March 29, 2013
2:00 pm
ESPNU
(4) Yale3 – 2 OT
(0–0, 2–0, 0–2, 1–0)
(1) MinnesotaVan Andel Arena, Grand Rapids
Attendance: 2289
March 29, 2013
5:30 pm
ESPNU
(3) Niagara1–2
(0–0, 1–0, 0–2)
(2) North DakotaVan Andel Arena, Grand Rapids
Attendance: 2289

Regional finalEdit

March 30, 2013
4:00 pm
ESPNU
(4) Yale4–1
(0–1, 0–0, 4–0)
(2) North DakotaVan Andel Arena, Grand Rapids
Attendance: 1918


Northeast Regional – Manchester, New HampshireEdit

Regional semifinals
March 29
Regional final
March 30
      
1 Massachusetts–Lowell (3) 6
4 Wisconsin 1
1 Massachusetts–Lowell 2
2 New Hampshire 0
3 Denver 2
2 New Hampshire 5

Note: * denotes overtime period(s)
All times are local (UTC−4).

Regional semifinalsEdit

March 29, 2013
4:30 pm
ESPN3
(4) Wisconsin1–6
(0–1, 0–2, 1–3)
(1) Massachusetts–LowellVerizon Wireless Arena, Manchester
Attendance: 8049
March 29, 2013
8:00 pm
ESPNU
(3) Denver2–5
(2–1, 0–2, 0–2)
(2) New HampshireVerizon Wireless Arena, Manchester
Attendance: 8049

Regional finalEdit

March 30, 2013
6:30 pm
ESPNU
(2) New Hampshire0–2
(0–0, 0–1, 0–1)
(1) Massachusetts–LowellVerizon Wireless Arena, Manchester
Attendance: 8357

Midwest Regional – Toledo, OhioEdit

Regional semifinals
March 30
Regional final
March 31
      
1 Notre Dame (4) 1
4 St. Cloud State 5
2 Miami 1
4 St. Cloud State 4
3 Minnesota State 0
2 Miami 4

Note: * denotes overtime period(s)
All times are local (UTC−4).

Regional semifinalsEdit

March 30, 2013
1:30 pm
ESPN3
(4) St. Cloud State5–1
(1–0, 3–0, 1–1)
(1) Notre DameHuntington Center, Toledo
Attendance: 2988
March 30, 2013
5:00 pm
ESPN3
(3) Minnesota State0–4
(0–0, 0–1, 0–3)
(2) MiamiHuntington Center, Toledo
Attendance: 2988

Regional finalEdit

March 31, 2013
4:00 pm
ESPNU
(4) St. Cloud State4–1
(1–0, 2–1, 1–0)
(2) MiamiHuntington Center, Toledo
Attendance: 2460

Frozen Four – PittsburghEdit

The Frozen Four featured four teams that were seeking their first championship. This was only the second time this had happened since the first NCAA championship tournament in 1948, the other time being in 1958. Additionally, of the four Frozen Four participants in 2013, only Yale had previously reached the tournament semifinals when they finished third in the 1952 tournament.[6] Yale's championship was the first for a team from ECAC Hockey since 1989. The championship game between Yale and Quinnipiac was the first time the championship game was contested between two ECAC Hockey teams since 1978.

National semifinals
April 11
National championship
April 13
      
E1 Quinnipiac 4
MW4 St. Cloud State 1
E1 Quinnipiac 0
W4 Yale 4
W4 Yale 3*
NE1 Massachusetts–Lowell 2

Note: * denotes overtime period(s)
All times are local (UTC−4).

National semifinalsEdit

April 11, 2013
4:30 pm
ESPN2
(W4) Yale3 – 2
(2–0, 0–2, 0–0, 1–0)
(NE1) Massachusetts–LowellConsol Energy Center, Pittsburgh
Attendance: 17,428
April 11, 2013
8:00 pm
ESPN2
(MW4) St. Cloud State1 – 4
(0–3, 1–1, 0–0)
(E1) QuinnipiacConsol Energy Center, Pittsburgh
Attendance: 17,428

National championshipEdit

April 13, 2013
7:00 pm
ESPN
(W4) Yale4 – 0
(0–0, 1–0, 3–0)
(E1) QuinnipiacConsol Energy Center, Pittsburgh
Attendance: 18,184
Scoring summary
Period Team Goal Assist(s) Time Score
1st None
2nd Yale Clinton Bourbonais (4) Young 39:56 1–0 Yale
3rd Yale Charles Orzetti (2) Bourbonais and Laganière 43:35 2–0 Yale
Yale Andrew Miller (18) Agostino 49:06 3–0 Yale
Yale Jesse Root (12) – EN Miller and O'Gara 53:02 4–0 Yale
Penalty summary
Period Team Player Penalty Time PIM
1st Yale Rob O'Gara Elbowing 02:41 2:00
QUI Cory Hibbeler Interference 04:51 2:00
Yale Colin Dueck Tripping 07:48 2:00
QUI Mike Dalhuisen Tripping 15:23 2:00
2nd QUI Jeremy Langlois Roughing 27:17 2:00
Yale Bench (Served by Anthony Day) Too Many Players 30:28 2:00
Yale Clinton Bourbonais Charging 31:25 2:00
QUI Bench (Served by Russell Goodman) Too Many Players 32:38 2:00
QUI Zach Davies Interference 33:25 2:00
3rd Yale Antoine Laganière Slashing 51:37 2:00
QUI Travis St. Denis Slashing 51:37 2:00

Record by conferenceEdit

Conference # of Bids Record Win % Regional Finals Frozen Four Championship Game Champions
WCHA 6 3–6 .333 2 1 - -
ECAC Hockey 3 8–2 .800 3 2 2 1
Hockey East 3 3–3 .500 2 1 - -
CCHA 2 1–2 .333 1 - - -
Atlantic Hockey 1 0–1 .000 - - - -

MediaEdit

TelevisionEdit

ESPN had US television rights to all games during the tournament.[7] For the ninth consecutive year ESPN aired every game, beginning with the regionals, on ESPN, ESPN2, and ESPNU, and ESPN3. They also streamed them online via WatchESPN.

Broadcast AssignmentsEdit

Regionals

Frozen Four & Championship

  • John Buccigross, Barry Melrose, & Clay Matvick – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

RadioEdit

Dial Global Sports used exclusive radio rights to air both the semifinals and the championship, AKA the "Frozen Four."[8]

All-Tournament TeamEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "NCAA Awards Frozen Four To Pittsburgh In 2013 And Philadelphia In 2014" (Press release). NCAA. July 13, 2010. Retrieved July 14, 2010.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ Sanserino, Michael (July 14, 2010). "Consol Energy Center to host 2013 Frozen Four". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved July 14, 2010.[dead link]
  3. ^ "Sites for 2013 NCAA D-I men's regionals announced". USCHO.com. October 5, 2011. Retrieved October 8, 2011.
  4. ^ http://www.mgoblue.com/sports/m-hockey/spec-rel/100511aaa.html
  5. ^ "Championship contenders announced". NCAA.com. March 24, 2012. Archived from the original on April 19, 2013. Retrieved March 25, 2012.
  6. ^ http://www.uscho.com/frozen-four/2013/03/31/its-a-new-look-frozen-four-field-with-yale-massachuetts-lowell-st-cloud-state-quinnipiac-set-for-pittsburgh/
  7. ^ Margolis, Rachel (December 15, 2011). "ESPN and NCAA® Extend Rights Agreement through 2023–24". ESPN. Retrieved 15 Dec 2011.
  8. ^ "NCAA, Westwood One extend deal". NCAA. January 13, 2011. Archived from the original on 2013-05-16. Retrieved 12 May 2013.
  9. ^ "NCAA Division I Awards". College Hockey Historical Archives. Retrieved 2013-07-17.