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The 80th 24 Hours of Le Mans (French: 80e 24 Heures du Mans) was an automobile endurance racing event held from 16 to 17 June 2012 at the Circuit de la Sarthe at Le Mans, France. It was the 80th running of the event, as organised by the automotive group, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) since 1923. The race was the third round and the premier event of the 2012 FIA World Endurance Championship, with thirty of the race's fifty-six entries contesting the championship. Approximately 240,000 people attended the race. A test day was held two weeks prior to the race on 3 June.

2012 24 Hours of Le Mans
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Index: Races | Winners
Highcroft Racing No. 0 Nissan Deltawing, First Garage 56 entry of the 2012 24 Hours of Le Mans

The No. 1 Audi R18 e-tron quattro of André Lotterer, Marcel Fässler and Benoît Tréluyer started from pole position after Lotterer set the fastest overall lap time in the third qualifying session. The car ran without trouble in the opening hours of the race until the No. 7 Toyota TS030 Hybrid of Alexander Wurz, Kazuki Nakajima and Nicolas Lapierre overtook it for the lead that it subsequently relinquished during a safety car period for circuit personnel to tend to a major accident at the start of the sixth hour. Audi's No. 2 car of Allan McNish, Tom Kristensen and Rinaldo Capello became the No. 1's lead challenger until McNish crashed while lapping slower traffic in the 22nd hour and providing the No. 1 with a lead it maintained to the end of the race. It was Lotterer, Fässler and Tréluyer's second Le Mans win, Audi's eleventh overall and the first for a hybrid electric vehicle. The No. 2 Audi finished one lap behind in second place and the No. 4 Audi R18 ultra of Oliver Jarvis, Marco Bonanomi and Mike Rockenfeller completed an Audi sweep of the overall podium positions in third.

The Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) category was won by the No. 44 Starworks Motorsport HPD ARX-03b driven by Enzo Potolicchio, Ryan Dalziel and Tom Kimber-Smith after it led the final 215 laps of the event. The trio finished ahead of the No. 46 Thiriet by TDS Racing Oreca 03 of Pierre Thiriet, Mathias Beche and Christophe Tinseau and the No. 49 Pecom Racing entry of Luís Pérez Companc, Pierre Kaffer and Soheil Ayari. Giancarlo Fisichella, Gianmaria Bruni and Toni Vilander in the No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari 458 Italia held a three-lap lead in Le Mans Grand Touring Professional (LMGTE Pro) over the No. 59 Luxury Racing car of Frédéric Makowiecki, Jaime Melo and Dominik Farnbacher. The Le Mans Grand Touring Amateur (LMGTE Am) category was won by the No. 50 Larbre Compétition Chevrolet Corvette C6.R of Patrick Bornhauser, Pedro Lamy and Julien Canal after Lamy overtook Anthony Pons, Nicolas Armindo and Raymond Narac's IMSA Performance Matmut Porsche 997 GT3-RSR in the final hour.

Due to the result of the race, McNish, Kristensen and Capello were elevated to the lead of the Drivers' Championship, 6½ points over the race winners Lotterer, Fässler and Tréluyer in second position. The leaders entering the event, Romain Dumas and Loïc Duval fell to third as Marc Gené stood in fourth place. The Rebellion trio of Nick Heidfeld, Neel Jani and Nico Prost completed the top five after finishing in fourth position. Audi continued to lead the non-scoring Toyota in the Manufacturers' Championship with five races left in the season.

Contents

BackgroundEdit

The 24 Hours of Le Mans was conceived at the 1922 Paris Motor Show by the automotive journalist Charles Faroux to Georges Durand, the president of the automotive group, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) and the industrialist Emile Coquile as a means of prompting car manufacturers to test the reliability and fuel-efficiency of their racing vehicles and equipment.[1][2] It was not held in 1936 because of a general labour strike during the Great Depression,[3] and heavy damage sustained to the circuit in World War II cancelled it from 1940 to 1948.[2] The 24 Hours of Le Mans is considered one of the world's most prestigious motor races and is part of the Triple Crown of Motorsport.[4]

The 2012 Le Mans schedule was moved forward one week by the ACO in order to avoid a date conflict with races held as part of the 2012 Formula One World Championship and to allow teams to establish their facilities at the Circuit de la Sarthe.[5] It was the 80th annual edition of the event, as well as the third (and premier) of eight scheduled automobile endurance racing events of the 2012 FIA World Endurance Championship.[6]

Coming into the 6 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps six weeks earlier, Audi drivers Romain Dumas and Loïc Duval led the Drivers' Championship with 43 points, two ahead of their teammates Rinaldo Capello, Tom Kristensen and Allan McNish in second place. Marc Gené was in third position with 25 points, the trio of Marcel Fässler, André Lotterer and Benoît Tréluyer were in fourth place with 19½ points and Timo Bernhard rounded out the top five with 18 points.[7] Audi led the non-scoring Toyota in the Manufacturers' Championship by 52 points.[7]

Regulation changesEdit

With the introduction of hybrid electric vehicles for the first time at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the ACO and the world governing body of motor racing, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), created seven zones on the Circuit de la Sarthe for those cars to recuperate electrical energy in the act of braking. Each zone was situated 50 m (160 ft) before the entry to a corner. The ACO and the FIA imposed a mandatory limit of 500 kJ (140 Wh) to restrict the amount of energy capable of being harvested by a energy recovery system between two braking zones and to regulate the capital needed to develop such systems.[8]

EntriesEdit

Automatic entriesEdit

Automatic entries are earned by teams which won their class in the 2011 24 Hours of Le Mans, or have won Le Mans-based series and events such as the American Le Mans Series, Le Mans Series, and the Petit Le Mans. Some second-place finishers are also granted automatic entries in certain series. Entries are also granted for the winners of the Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge in the both the American Le Mans Series and Le Mans Series. A final entry is granted to the champion in the Formula Le Mans category of the Le Mans Series, with the winner receiving their invitation in Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2). As automatic entries are granted to teams, the teams are allowed to change their cars from the previous year to the next, but are not allowed to change their category. However, automatic invitations in the two GTE categories are able to be swapped between the two based on the driver line-ups chosen by these teams. As the American Le Mans Series did not separate between the Pro and Am categories, only a single GTE invitation was granted for their class champion.[9]

On 24 November 2011, the list of automatic entries was announced by the ACO.[9] Peugeot Sport chose not to accept their automatic invitation as the manufacturer withdrew from sports car racing in January 2012 due to financial difficulties.[10] BMW Team RLL and Pegasus Racing were the other two teams who did not take up their entries because both teams elected to focus on their respective series during the 2012 season.[9]

Reason Entered LMP1 LMP2 LMGTE Pro LMGTE Am
1st in the 24 Hours of Le Mans   Audi Sport Team Joest   Greaves Motorsport   Corvette Racing   Larbre Compétition
1st in the Le Mans Series   Rebellion Racing   Greaves Motorsport   AF Corse   IMSA Performance Matmut
2nd in the Le Mans Series   Pescarolo Team   Strakka Racing   JMW Motorsport   AF Corse
1st in the American Le Mans Series   Dyson Racing Team Not Awarded   BMW Team RLL
2nd in the American Le Mans Series   Muscle Milk Aston Martin Racing Not Awarded   Corvette Racing
1st in the Petit Le Mans   Peugeot Sport Total   Level 5 Motorsports   AF Corse   Krohn Racing
1st in Le Mans Series Energy Endurance Challenge   Pescarolo Team   AF Corse
1st in American Le Mans Series Energy Endurance Challenge   Dyson Racing Team   BMW Team RLL
1st in Le Mans Series FLM category   Pegasus Racing
Source:[9]

Entry listEdit

In conjunction with the announcement of entries for the 2012 FIA World Endurance Championship, the ACO announced the full 56 car entry list and nine vehicle reserve list at a press conference in Paris on 2 February.[11] In addition to the 30 guaranteed entries from the World Endurance Championship, five came from the American Le Mans Series, thirteen from the Le Mans Series, while the rest of the field was filled with one-off entries only competing at Le Mans.[12]

Garage 56Edit

For the 56th and final entry for the 2012 running of Le Mans, the ACO promoted cars which featured advancements in technology, either for performance or ecological improvement. Three projects were submitted to the ACO, with the automatic entry being granted to an American group by the name of Project 56 who developed the DeltaWing concept originally proposed for the American IndyCar Series. The extremely lightweight car features a unique layout that is far removed from the style of Le Mans Prototypes. The project was backed by Highcroft Racing, All American Racers and the Panoz Group.[13] Two other entries had been granted reserve status if the DeltaWing team withdrew; the Swiss-developed GreenGT LMP-H2, which utilized a hydrogen fuel cell to run electric motors within a Le Mans Prototype style body,[14] and the French Courage 0.12 used stored energy to drive electric motors.[15]

ReservesEdit

Nine reserves were initially nominated by the ACO, limited to the LMP2 (five) and both of the LMGTE (four) categories.[12] Dyson Racing announced on 16 April that both of their Lola B12/60-Mazda cars would be withdrawn from the entry list, citing a financial difficulty that prevented the team from accumulating the necessary budget to compete at Le Mans and a desire to focus on the American Le Mans Series. This promoted the No. 30 Status Grand Prix Lola B12/80 and the No. 48 Murphy Prototypes Oreca 03-Nissan to the race entry list.[16] That same day, the ACO released a revised entry list which confirmed the withdrawal of the Dyson Racing entries as well as the Jetalliance, Hope Racing, Lotus Cars and Aston Martin Racing reserve entries. By the start of the event, three reserved entries had not been promoted to the race entry.[17]

Testing and practiceEdit

A test day was held on 3 June, two weeks prior to the race, and required all entrants for the race to participate in eight hours of track time divided into two sessions.[18] A second Level 5 Motorsports HPD ARX-03b for Scott Tucker, and the No. 32 Lotus Lola B12/80 and the IMSA Performance Porsche 997 GT3-RSR reserve entries took part. Sébastien Loeb Racing and a pair of DAMS-entered Le Mans Prototype Challenge Oreca-FLM09s also participated.[19] Stéphane Sarrazin of Toyota was unable to take part in both of the sessions after sustaining facial injuries from a bike accident on the afternoon of 2 June.[20]

Duval set the fastest time in the first session with a lap of 3 minutes and 27.738 seconds in the No. 3 Audi R18 Ultra,[21] but McNish improved to a lap of 3 minutes and 25.927 seconds in the No. 2 Audi R18 e-tron quattro though he crashed at Tertre Rouge corner with one hour remaining and was unable to continue.[22] He was followed by Lotterer's No. 1 Audi in second and Duval fell to third. The fastest Toyota TS030 Hybrid was fourth courtesy of a lap from Alexander Wurz and the fastest privateer LMP1 entry was Danny Watts' No. 21 Strakka Racing HPD ARX-03a in sixth.[22] At the end of the first session, Guillaume Moreau crashed the No. 15 OAK Racing Pescarolo heavily against a concrete barrier in the Porsche Curves, sustaining a fracture to the T12 vertebrae on his spinal cord. He underwent an operation at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Angers to reduce the pressure on his spinal cord and was ruled out of the race.[23] His place was taken by former Peugeot driver Franck Montagny.[24] Olivier Pla's OAK Racing Morgan LMP2 led in LMP2 as Frédéric Makowiecki in the No. 59 Luxury Racing Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 was the fastest driver in LMGTE Pro and Allan Simonsenhelped Aston Martin to be fastest in LMGTE Am.[22] Separate crashes from Piergiuseppe Perazzini, Rui Águas, Jordan Taylor, Pierre Thiriet and Gianmaria Bruni led to disruptions during the second session.[25]

After the test several prototype teams, including all Audi, Toyota, Pescarolo and Starworks Motorsports cars participated in an unofficial test on the shorter Bugatti Circuit on 6 June to ensure car components were working efficiently before the race.[26] Official practice was held on 13 June with the full 56-car field on track for four hours.[18] Audi led from the start once again, with Duval and later Tréluyer setting the early pace until Kristensen went faster before a lap of 3 minutes and 25.163 seconds from Lotterer at the end of the session topped the time sheets and Audi took the first four places. Kazuki Nakajima was the fastest Toyota driver in fifth and his teammate Anthony Davidson was sixth.[27] A powertrain issue stopped the No. 8 Toyota on the Mulsanne Straight and it required an engine change.[27][28] Watts was the fastest LMP1 privateer in seventh and Sébastien Bourdais's No. 17 Pescarolo Dome-Judd placed eighth.[27] The No. 16 Pescarolo of Jean-Christophe Boullion pirouetted and crashed heavily against a guardrail at 268 km/h (167 mph), damaging his ribs and leaving him unable to compete for the rest of the race meeting.[29] Tom Kimber-Smith in the No. 44 Starworks HPD ARX-03b set the pace in LMP2 with a 3 minutes and 39.669 seconds lap, ahead of the No. 38 Jota Zytek Z11SN of Sam Hancock and Warren Hughes' No. 48 Murphy Prototypes Oreca.[27][28] The LMGTE Pro category was led by the No. 97 Aston Martin of Darren Turner with a time of 3 minutes and 57.036 seconds and Patrick Pilet in the No. 79 Flying Lizard Porsche was fastest in LMGTE Am and he lapped with 1.2 seconds of Turner's pace.[28] The No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari caused a stoppage after Giancarlo Fisichella pirouetted and heavily damaged the car's rear-left corner in the Porsche Curves. The ACO and the FIA applied force majeure and allowed the car's chassis to be transported to AF Corse's factory in Piacenza for reconstruction.[30]

QualifyingEdit

The first of three two hour qualifying sessions began late 13 June night under clear conditions.[31] Audi led from the first minutes of the session with a flying lap from Oliver Jarvis in the No. 4 Audi,[31] followed by Kristensen overtaking Jarvis after he was not impeded. He was followed by Lotterer whose final timed lap of 3 minutes and 25.453 seconds earned provisional pole position in the No. 1 Audi. Kristensen's time put the No. 2 car second and Duval's No. 3 entry finished the session in third. The No. 7 Toyota of Nicolas Lapierre was 1.7 seconds adrift of the fastest Audi in fourth.[32] Mike Rockenfeller's No. 4 Audi took fifth and Davidson's No. 8 Toyota in sixth was the slowest of all the hybrid cars. Watts, driving the No. 21 Strakka Racing HPD, was the top non-hybrid LMP1 vehicle in seventh.[31] Mathias Beche drove the No. 46 Thiriet by TDS Oreca to provisional pole in LMP2 with a lap of 3 minutes and 39.252 seconds ahead of the Murphy Oreca of Brendon Hartley and Kimber-Smith's Starworks HPD. Keiko Ihara crashed the No. 29 Gulf Racing Middle East Lola at the Dunlop Curves and was extricated from a barrier by recovery vehicles. The Pro class of LMGTE had Chevrolet lead from the start with the fastest lap set by Oliver Gavin in the No. 74 C6.R at 3 minutes and 55.910 seconds. Ferrari, Aston Martin and Porsche all had cars within two seconds of the Corvette. Pilet's Flying Lizard Porsche set the pace in LMGTE Am, followed by Sean Edwards' No. 75 Prospeed Competition car and Simonsen's Aston Martin.[31] The experimental DeltaWing driven by Michael Krumm suffered a heavy jolt on a kerb that activated its onboard fire extinguisher and the master electrical switch, disabling the engine.[33]

 
The No. 59 Luxury Racing Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 that took pole position in LMGTE Pro.

Weather conditions continued to be clear for the second session on 14 June. Duval's Audi R18 Ultra was quickest in the session with a lap of 3 minutes and 24.098 seconds on 30 minutes to go and moved ahead of the sister No. 1 Audi of Lotterer for provisional pole position. McNish in the No. 2 car finished the session in third at the conclusion of a final six-lap stint as Davidson prevented Audi from taking the first four positions in the No. 8 Toyota. The No. 4 Audi of Marco Bonanomi fell to fifth and Toyota's sister No. 7 entry driven by Nakajima dropped to sixth after Lapierre lost control of its rear and spun into an area of grass entering the Ford Chicane. Watts' Strakka Racing HPD improved its best lap to ensure it remained the fastest non-hybrid LMP1 vehicle in seventh with Neel Jani's No. 12 Rebellion Lola-Toyota eighth.[34] One second covered the first six vehicles in LMP2 as Pla gave OAK Racing's Oreca provisional pole in class at the conclusion of the session with a time of 3 minutes and 38.598 seconds despite a driver error into a gravel trap at Indianapolis corner with Nelson Panciatici's No. 26 Signatech second. In LMGTE Pro, Makowiecki moved the No. 59 Luxury Racing Ferrari to the provisional category pole position. Turner helped Aston Martin to finish the session second and Tommy Milner's No. 74 Corvette took third.[35] The No. 58 Luxury Racing Ferrari was the fastest LMGTE Am car of the session yet it was more than 1.2 seconds behind the Flying Lizard Porsche's pole lap.[34]

 
André Lotterer earned the seventh pole position for Audi at Le Mans.

In the third session, Lotterer in the No. 1 R18 e-tron quattro set a new fastest lap of 3 minutes and 23.787 seconds thirteen minutes in and held the top of the time sheets to take pole position for Audi.[36] Audi was the first manufacturer to earn pole position with an hybrid electric vehicle at Le Mans and took its seventh overall pole at the race.[37] Duval improved the No. 3 Audi's lap to sit alongside the No. 1 car on the grid's front row.[38] The No. 8 Toyota of Davidson closed to almost within a second of the pole sitting Audi with fifteen minutes remaining to take third position.[39] Kristensen separated the two Toyota entries in fourth place as Nakajima qualified the No. 7 TS030 Hybrid fifth and the final manufacturer vehicle was Jarvis' No. 4 Audi in sixth.[36] Watts won against the Rebellion car of Jani to be the fastest non-hybrid LMP1 car in seventh. Seiji Ara in the No. 17 Pescarolo Dome made impact with a barrier at the Porsche Curves and brought out the sole stoppage of ten minutes in all three sessions. In LMP2, John Martin's No. 26 ADR-Delta Oreca set a time of 3 minutes and 38.181 seconds in the first minutes of the session to move the team to pole position and its lap was unchallenged thereafter. Pla's OAK Oreca fell to second and Panciatici's Signatech started from third after an error during the session. The No. 97 Aston Martin of Turner was unable to better the car's time to displace Makowiecki's No. 59 Luxury Racing Ferrari at the top of LMGTE Pro and Milner's No. 74 Corvette remained third in category. The lead in LMGTE Am remained with the Flying Lizard Porsche, 0.012 seconds ahead of the No. 77 Team Felbermayr-Proton Pro category car.[38]

Qualifying resultsEdit

Pole position winners in each class are indicated in bold and by a   The fastest time set by each entry is denoted in gray.

Pos No. Team Car Class Qualifying 1 Qualifying 2 Qualifying 3 Gap Grid
1 1 Audi Sport Team Joest Audi R18 e-tron quattro LMP1 3:25.453 3:24.997 3:23.787 1 
2 3 Audi Sport Team Joest Audi R18 ultra LMP1 3:26.694 3:24.078 3:27.578 +0.291 2
3 8 Toyota Racing Toyota TS030 Hybrid LMP1 3:28.295 3:26.151 3:24.842 +1.055 3
4 2 Audi Sport Team Joest Audi R18 e-tron quattro LMP1 3:26.536 3:26.038 3:25.433 +1.646 4
5 7 Toyota Racing Toyota TS030 Hybrid LMP1 3:27.191 3:26.502 3:25.488 +1.701 5
6 4 Audi Sport North America Audi R18 ultra LMP1 3:27.554 3:26.420 3:26.600 +2.633 6
7 21 Strakka Racing HPD ARX-03a-Honda LMP1 3:32.750 3:29.622 3:37.253 +5.835 7
8 12 Rebellion Racing Lola B12/60-Toyota LMP1 3:33.211 3:29.837 3:34.476 +6.050 8
9 13 Rebellion Racing Lola B12/60-Toyota LMP1 3:33.140 3:31.866 3:41.533 +8.079 9
10 17 Pescarolo Team Dome S102.5-Judd LMP1 3:34.716 3:34.925 3:33.066 +9.279 10
11 22 JRM HPD ARX-03a-Honda LMP1 3:37.088 No Time 3:35.421 +11.634 11
12 15 OAK Racing OAK Pescarolo 01-Judd LMP1 3:38.414 3:37.367 3:35.584 +11.797 12
13 16 Pescarolo Team Pescarolo 03-Judd LMP1 No Time 3:37.485 3:48.716 +13.698  —1
14 25 ADR-Delta Oreca 03-Nissan LMP2 3:41.791 3:40.174 3:38.181 +14.394 13 
15 24 OAK Racing Morgan LMP2-Judd LMP2 3:40.902 3:38.598 3:40.310 +14.811 14
16 26 Signatech-Nissan Oreca 03-Nissan LMP2 3:42.157 3:39.152 3:44.622 +15.365 15
17 46 Thiriet by TDS Racing Oreca 03-Nissan LMP2 3:39.252 3:41.975 3:41.990 +15.465 16
18 49 Pecom Racing Oreca 03-Nissan LMP2 3:41.916 3:39.711 3:40.292 +15.924 17
19 48 Murphy Prototypes Oreca 03-Nissan LMP2 3:39.877 3:40.652 3:42.057 +16.090 18
20 35 OAK Racing Morgan LMP2-Nissan LMP2 3:41.721 3:39.899 3:41.707 +16.112 19
21 30 Status Grand Prix Lola B12/80-Judd LMP2 3:41.451 3:42.518 3:40.280 +16.493 20
22 44 Starworks Motorsport HPD ARX-03b-Honda LMP2 3:40.639 3:41.863 3:40.471 +16.684 21
23 45 Boutsen Ginion Racing Oreca 03-Nissan LMP2 3:40.727 3:43.763 3:42.949 +16.940 22
24 42 Greaves Motorsport Zytek Z11SN-Nissan LMP2 3:42.125 3:40.738 3:43.230 +16.951 23
25 38 Jota Zytek Z11SN-Nissan LMP2 3:41.287 3:41.428 No Time +17.500 24
26 23 Signatech-Nissan Oreca 03-Nissan LMP2 3:44.495 3:42.581 3:41.982 +18.195 25
27 33 Level 5 Motorsports HPD ARX-03b-Honda LMP2 3:42.224 No Time 3:42.696 +18.437 26
28 41 Greaves Motorsport Zytek Z11SN-Nissan LMP2 3:47.408 3:43.406 3:42.292 +18.505 27
29 0 Highcroft Racing DeltaWing-Nissan CDNT 3:42.612 3:48.142 3:50.903 +18.825 28
30 40 Race Performance Oreca 03-Judd LMP2 3:48.124 3:43.619 3:46.200 +19.832 29
31 31 Lotus Lola B12/80-Lotus LMP2 3:48.067 No Time 3:45.664 +21.877 30
32 28 Gulf Racing Middle East Lola B12/80-Nissan LMP2 3:50.526 3:47.244 4:15.649 +23.457 31
33 43 Extrême Limite ARIC Norma MP200P-Judd LMP2 3:51.012 3:53.560 3:48.025 +24.238 32
34 59 Luxury Racing Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Pro 3:56.076 3:55.393 3:58.647 +31.606 33 
35 97 Aston Martin Racing Aston Martin Vantage GTE LMGTE Pro 3:57.466 3:55.870 3:56.036 +32.083 34
36 74 Corvette Racing Chevrolet Corvette C6.R LMGTE Pro 3:55.910 3:58.214 3:57.981 +32.123 35
37 71 AF Corse Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Pro 3:57.509 3:58.960 3:56.484 +32.697 36
38 73 Corvette Racing Chevrolet Corvette C6.R LMGTE Pro 3:57.181 3:59.433 3:59.471 +33.394 37
39 79 Flying Lizard Motorsports Porsche 997 GT3-RSR LMGTE Am 3:57.594 4:09.762 4:03.420 +33.807 38 
40 77 Team Felbermayr-Proton Porsche 997 GT3-RSR LMGTE Pro 3:57.648 3:57.606 4:19.147 +33.819 39
41 75 Prospeed Competition Porsche 997 GT3-RSR LMGTE Am 3:58.035 9:51.593 3:59.739 +34.248 40
42 80 Flying Lizard Motorsports Porsche 997 GT3-RSR LMGTE Pro 3:58.717 4:00.011 3:59.372 +34.930 41
43 99 Aston Martin Racing Aston Martin Vantage GTE LMGTE Am 3:58.725 4:00.958 No Time +34.938 42
44 58 Luxury Racing Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Am 4:00.849 3:58.800 No Time +35.013 43
45 29 Gulf Racing Middle East Lola B12/80-Nissan LMP2 4:14.086 No Time 3:58.895 +35.108 44
46 88 Team Felbermayr-Proton Porsche 997 GT3-RSR LMGTE Am 3:59.529 3:59.181 3:59.971 +35.394 45
47 50 Larbre Compétition Chevrolet Corvette C6.R LMGTE Am 3:59.192 4:05.426 4:13.459 +35.405 46
48 66 JMW Motorsport Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Pro 4:00.883 3:59.638 4:10.192 +35.851 47
49 51 AF Corse Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Pro No Time No Time 4:00.025 +36.238 48
50 81 AF Corse Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Am 4:04.493 4:00.288 4:00.924 +36.501 49
51 67 IMSA Performance Matmut Porsche 997 GT3-RSR LMGTE Am 4:00.332 4:00.829 4:07.180 +36.545 50
52 61 AF Corse-Waltrip Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Am 4:04.861 4:00.691 4:08.217 +36.904 51
53 57 Krohn Racing Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Am 4:04.698 4:04.075 4:02.323 +38.536 52
54 83 JMB Racing Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 LMGTE Am 4:04.416 4:02.461 4:20.082 +38.674 53
55 70 Larbre Compétition Chevrolet Corvette C6.R LMGTE Am 4:03.021 4:02.969 4:09.709 +39.182 54
56 55 JWA-Avila Porsche 997 GT3-RSR LMGTE Am 4:08.170 4:03.661 4:03.705 +39.874 55
Source:[40]

Notes:

  • ^1 —The No. 16 Pescarolo 03-Judd started from the pit lane after a change of engine overran into the race.[41]

Warm-upEdit

The cars took to the circuit on the morning of 16 June for a 45-minute warm-up session on a waterlogged track. The No. 3 Audi driven by Duval set the fastest lap of 4 minutes and 3.933 seconds with the sister No. 2 car of Capello second and the pole sitting No. 1 of Lotterer third.[42] Jarvis' No. 4 Audi was fourth, the quickest Toyota was fifth after a time from Wurz and his teammate Sarrazin was sixth. The fastest LMP2 lap was recorded by the No. 42 Greaves Motorsport Zytek Nissan of Lucas Ordóñez. AF Corse's No. 51 Ferrari driven by Toni Vilander was the fastest car in LMGTE Pro while Joël Camathias of JWA-Avila helped Ferrari to lead in LMGTE Am.[43][44] During the session, where several cars aquaplaned on the track, Marc Rostan spun the No. 29 Gulf Racing Middle East Lola on the start/finish straight and Jan Charouz beached the No. 25 ADR-Delta Oreca in a gravel trap at Dunlop Curve leading to the session being stopped for ten minutes.[42]

RaceEdit

StartEdit

The conditions on the grid were dry and sunny before the race with an air temperature between 10.5 to 21 °C (50.9 to 69.8 °F) and the track temperature ranged from 15.5 to 26 °C (59.9 to 78.8 °F).[45] Approximately 240,000 spectators attended the race.[6] The French tricolour was waved at 15:00 Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00),[18] by Takeshi Uchiyamada, the vice president and director of Toyota, to start the race,[46] led by the starting pole sitter Lotterer.[47] Fifty six cars planned to take the start but the No. 16 Pescarolo 03-Judd underwent an engine change in the pit lane after it failed during the warm-up session and the No. 21 Strakka Racing HPD had a gearbox oil leak caused by a seal connecting the driveshaft and the gearbox failing. Lotterer maintained his lead on the opening lap and he pulled away from the rest of the field.[41] McNish's No. 2 Audi overtook Sarrazin's No. 8 Toyota for third and he held off a counter-challenge from Sarrazin to keep the position. Light rain fell on the north section of the track though it was not heavy enough to affect the race.[48]

In LMP2, John Martin led the first nine laps until Pla's OAK Oreca passed him during pit stop rotation. The No. 59 Luxury Racing Ferrari of Jaime Melo fell to fifth in the opening laps as LMGTE Am began as a multi-car battle between representatives of Porsche, Ferrari and Aston Martin with the lead of the class changing multiple times during the first hour.[48] The LMGTE classes continued to be closely contested in the second hour with the No. 97 Aston Martin of Stefan Mücke, AF Corse's No. 51 Ferrari of Bruni and the No. 74 Corvette of Gavin duelling for the head of the Pro category. Kimber-Smith was lapping faster than Soheil Ayari driving the No. 49 Pecom Oreca in the LMP2 category at the time and he brought the Starworks HPD to second in class. The hour had the first retirement with the No. 29 Gulf Racing Middle East Lola sustaining a broken front-left wheel alignment from an accident leaving the Porsche Curves by Rostan as the No. 79 Flying Lizard of Pilet and later Spencer Pumpelly took a clear lead in LMGTE Am after the No. 99 Aston Martin of Simonsen developed a misfire.[49][50] LMGTE Pro continued to be close battle between Milner's No. 74 Corvette, the No. 97 Aston Martin of Turner and the No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari driven by Bruni with the three cars nose-to-tail on the circuit and the lead changed frequently. The Ferrari was subsequently able to remain on track for longer than its competitors during a sequence of pit stops.[51]

Nearly four hours into the race, Kristensen's No. 2 Audi returned to the garage so that the team's mechanics could remove a large amount of rubber debris lodged in its right-rear suspension arm and created a vibration. Kristensen returned to the race in fifth position and a routine pit stop for Duval's No. 3 car promoted the Toyota cars of Lapierre and Buemi to second and third.[52][53] Although Toyota had less fuel economy than Audi,[52] Buemi and later his teammate Lapierre were able to attack in the fourth hour and lowered Tréluyer's lead to twenty seconds. Jody Firth in the No. 48 Murphy Prototypes Oreca-Nissan overhauled Ryan Dalziel's Starworks HPD for third in LMP2 and he pulled away from Dalziel to lead him by twenty seconds. Lapierre sustained damage to the No. 7 Toyota's right rear wing endplate which later detached and he continued in second position.[54] Not long after Dumas was lapping the LMGTE-Am leading No. 79 Flying Lizard Porsche of Seth Neiman at the first Mulsanne Straight chicane and he understeered heavily into a tyre barrier with the No. 4 Audi's front-right corner.[52][55] The car sustained heavy damage to its front bodywork,[55] and required a 26 minutes and 34 seconds pit stop to replace it and dropping the car down the race order.[56] The fifth hour ended with Lapierre duelling Tréluyer for the lead and passed the No. 1 Audi on the grass after Mulsanne corner before the two drivers exchanged positions twice more.[55]

Evening to nightEdit

 
The No. 7 Toyota TS030 Hybrid which was involved in a major accident with LMGTE Am Ferrari that forced its retirement in the sixth hour.

At the start of the sixth hour Davidson in third was lapping Perazzini's No. 81 AF Corse Ferrari when the left-rear of the No. 8 Toyota made contact with the front-right of the Ferrari at the end of the Mulsanne Straight.[57] The Toyota rotated through 360 degrees,[58] lifted into the air after its right-rear wheel detached in the collision with the Ferrari and allowed air to penetrate its floor, It made contact with the tarmac with its front-left corner and hurtled upright at high speed towards a tyre wall at Mulsanne corner. Perrazzini's Ferrari made heavy side contact with an armco metal barrier that caused it to deform and the vehicle was turned onto its roof. The safety cars were deployed to slow the race as marshals worked for 70 minutes to replace and repair the damaged barriers and extricate the two cars from the track.[59] Both Davidson and Perrazzini vacated their vehicles without external assistance;[57] Davidson was transported to a local hospital from the circuit's medical centre complaining of shock and back pain. Davidson was found to have fractured the T11 and T12 vertebrae while Perrazzini was unhurt.[60]

Half a minute after racing resumed the overall leading No. 1 Audi of Fässler was delayed by slower traffic, causing Nakajima's No. 7 Toyota to collide with the left-hand corner of the No. 0 DeltaWing of Satoshi Motoyama and sent the latter into a concrete barrier beside the circuit.[61] The DeltaWing sustained damage to its steering arm, powertrain and rear bodywork; track marshals pushed it behind the wall to allow mechanics from Highcroft Racing to advise Motoyama on how to repair the car. He spent 90 minutes repairing the car with garage equipment though he was unable to make it mobile and retired.[62][63] Brendon Hartley was the fastest LMP2 driver at the time and he brought the No. 48 Greaves Oreca to the lead of the category. The No. 7 Toyota was driven into the pit lane for repairs to its rear and the crash promoted Audi to the first three positions. Pedro Lamy in the No. 50 Larbre Compétition got involved in a battle with Nicolas Armindo's No. 67 IMSA Performance Porsche for the lead of LMGTE Am.[61] Maxime Martin returned OAK's No. 24 Oreca to the lead in LMP2 until a puncture during his first lap out of the pit lane after a routine stop allowed the No. 48 Murphy Oreca-Nissan of Hughes back to the front of the category.[64]

Lotterer had an anxious moment when he made a driver error during the first third of a lap in the No. 1 Audi though he returned to the track without losing the overall lead. Further down the field the fuel efficiency of the Ferrari 458 Italia allowed the No. 51 AF Corse of Bruni to remain in contention with the LMGTE Pro leading Corvette of Milner.[65] As it turned 17 June, the No. 48 Murphy Oreca-Nissan relinqushed the lead of LMP2 when driver Hughes entered the pit lane with a right-rear puncture that sent the car into a pirouette at the exit to Arnage corner and caused damage to its rear wheel arch and deck.[66][67] Pla retook the class lead in the No. 24 OAK Oreca until he too was forced to slow and enter the pit lane with a sudden loss of oil pressure that was unable to be rectified and forced the car's retirement,[68] returning the No. 44 Starworks HPD of Kimber-Smith and later Dalziel to the category lead.[66] In the eleventh hour, Westbrook had just relieved Milner in the No. 74 Corvette when its left-rear tyre detached in the Dunlop Esses and forcing him to slow for the rest of the lap en route to the pit lane for repairs to the car's bodywork and underwent a change of brake discs.[69] The car relinquished the lead of LMGTE Pro it had held for 66 consecutive laps to the No. 51 AF Corse.[70]

Toyota lost its one remaining entry when the No. 7 car retired after 10½ hours with an engine failure.[6] The No. 74 Corvette emerged on the track soon after though it was once again involved in an incident when Westbrook crashed at the first Mulsanne Straight chicane and necessitating repairs to its bodywork and a change of differential and halfshaft. A major accident for Frankie Montecalvo's No. 58 Luxury Racing Ferrari caused the car to retire with heavy left-hand side damage and its front wing removed.[69] As the race approached half distance, the No. 1 Audi of Fässler led Kristensen's No. 2 car by 40 seconds before a driver change, Bonamoni's No. 3 entry was in third position and the recovering No. 4 driven by Dumas was fourth after contact with the No. 70 Larbre Corvette at the Ford Chicane. Makowiecki lost ground to the LMGTE Pro leading AF Corse Ferrari of Fisichella in the No. 59 Luxury Racing car after a driver error put him into a gravel trap at Indianapolis corner.[71] McNish took over the No. 2 Audi and lapped in the 3 minutes and 30 seconds range to which Fässler's No. 1 entry responded to stabilise a gap to 1 minute and 20 seconds at the conclusion of the 13th hour.[72]

Morning to early afternoonEdit

 
AF Corse won for the first time at the 24 Hours of Le Mans with the No. 51 Ferrari.

In the early morning the No. 1 Audi of Fässler spun in the Porsche Curves and made contact with the rear of the car against a barrier, relinquishing first place to McNish's No. 2 car.[73] During this period a broken left-rear transmission on Hartley's No. 48 Murphy Oreca-Nissan failed and caused one of the car's rear wheels to lock before track marshals pushed the car towards the pit lane where it was retired from the event.[74] Abdulaziz Al Faisal spun and crashed backwards against a concrete barrier in the Porsche Curves causing enough damage to retire the vehicle and required the deployment of the safety cars for the second time in the race.[73] When racing resumed Harold Primat's No. 13 Rebellion Lola spun on cold tyres exiting the Porsche Curves though he avoided contact with a barrier beside the circuit. The car lost a large amount of time while it was recovered by track marshals and Primat continued in sixth overall. The safety cars allowed Lotterer's No. 1 Audi to return to the lead after the No. 2 entry of McNish entered the pit lane for a routine pit stop.[75] Mücke, holding second place in LMGTE Pro, lost control of the No. 97 Aston Martin, went straight on and made contact with the car's right-hand side against a tyre wall to the right of the track.[76] The car sustained minor damage and after repairs which dropped it four laps, returned to the track third in class.[77] AF Corse had their lead in LMGTE Pro further strengthened when Makowiecki's Luxury Racing Ferrari picked up a right-rear puncture and forcing the team's mechanics to replace it.[76][77]

Duval in the No. 3 Audi became the lead challenger to the No. 12 Rebellion Lola, setting the fastest lap of the race at the time of 3 minutes and 25.671 seconds which he then lowered to a 3 minutes and 25.165 seconds and passing the Rebellion for fourth overall.[78] Brian Vickers made minor contact against a wall at Tetre Rouge corner and the No. 71 AF Corse Ferrari sustained a left-front puncture. As he entered the pit lane, the front-left wheel caught fire, which was extinguished by fire marshals and the Ferrari was transported into the garage for repairs to its bodywork.[79] Over three hours after reclaiming the race lead, Fässler encountered the No. 74 Corvette which spun at Mulsanne corner and he damaged the No. 1 Audi's rear bodywork against a barrier in avoidance. Audi told Fässler to remain on the circuit until his next scheduled stop to replace the damaged component. Repairs took more than two minutes to complete and it allowed Kristensen's No. 2 car to reclaim the lead following a pit stop for fuel. Kristensen overhauled Fässler in a duel for the lead on the Mulsanne Straight after a driver error sent the latter into a gravel trap.[80] Separate pit stop strategies for the No. 1 and 2 Audis saw the lead exchange several times, while the No. 13 Rebellion was forced into the pit lane to change its clutch and forfeiting sixth place to the No. 22 JRM HPD.[81] Ayari, driving the No. 49 Pecom Oreca, held second place in LMP2 until he ran wide at Indianapolis corner and beached the car in a gravel trap. The Oreca dropped from second to fourth after recovery vehicles extricated the car from the gravel and a subsequent a pit stop to remove debris from it.[82]

 
Larbre Compétition took its fifth class victory in Le Mans in the final twenty minutes of the race.

The No. 4 Audi of Bonanomi twice stopped on the circuit with a transmission fault that he rectified by resetting the ignition system though the car remained in third position, ahead of the sister No. 4.[83][84] Not long after Simon Dolan lost control of the No. 38 Jota Zytek, crashed heavily in the Porsche Curves and sending the car facing in the opposite direction; the car was subsequently abandoned in the garage due to extensive damage to its rear.[84] The race-leading No. 1 Audi of Tréluyer spun at the entry to the pit lane as he slowed to comply with the pit lane speed limit and losing him the lead to McNish in the No. 2 car who extended it to forty-seven seconds.[85] Audi suffered two accidents in the 22nd hour that warranted the third deployment of the safety cars. Gené in the No. 3 Audi repeated his co-driver Dumas' accident from the fifth hour when he understeered into a wall at the exit to the first Mulsanne Straight chicane and damaged the car's front bodywork and front-right suspension. The No. 2 car of McNish oversteered at its rear while lapping the No. 59 Luxury Racing Ferrari and punctured a hole on an armco metal barrier in the Porsche Curves. Repairs to the No. 2 Audi dropped McNish one lap behind Lotterer and Gené fell behind the No. 13 Rebellion in fourth place.[86][87] After racing resumed, the No. 76 IMSA Performance Porsche of Anthony Pons lost the lead of LMGTE Am to Lamy's No. 50 Larbre Compétition Corvette which it maintained to the finish to earn the team's fifth class victory after the Porsche sustained a left-rear puncture on the final lap.[88][89]

FinishEdit

The No. 1 Audi R18 e-tron quattro of Fässler, Lotterer and Tréluyer maintained the race lead without trouble for the final two hours of the race,[6] taking the trio's second consecutive win and Audi's eleventh overall in a distance of 5,151.8 km (3,201.2 mi) and 378 laps.[90] Audi completed a sweep of the podium positions with the No. 2 and No. 4 cars in second and third.[6] The Audi R18 e-tron quattro was the first hybrid electric vehicle to win the 24 Hour race,[6] and the first for a four-wheel drivetrain.[90] Starworks Motorsport was undaunted in LMP2 and maintained the first-place position it had held for 215 consecutive laps to win,[70] earning Kimber-Smith his third class victory and Dalziel and Pottolicchio's first.[91] Thiriet by TDS Racing and Pecom Racing were second and third in class. AF Corse held their three-lap lead over Luxury Racing in LMGTE Pro and took their first class win. It gave Bruni his second category win, and Fisichella and Vilander's first. Aston Martin Racing came third in the category. IMSA Performance were able to secure a second-place finish in LMGTE Am after the team's late event puncture and Krohn Racing followed in third.[92] There were eighteen outright lead changes amongst three cars during the race. The No. 1 Audi led ten times for a total of 326 laps, more than any other car.[70]

Post-raceEdit

The top three teams in each of the four classes appeared on the podium to collect their trophies and spoke to the media in the later press conferences.[18] Lotterer said Audi's victory over Peugeot in the 2011 edition provided him with the confidence to challenge Toyota, "For me, I'm more new in Le Mans so to be in that situation was amazing, so this year we had a bit more confidence within the team. We know we can trust each other even more and this gave us good potential. But you come to Le Mans and you can't expect to win, you just do your best and hope that it will work."[93] McNish apologised for the accident that caused the crew of the No. 2 Audi to lose a chance at victory, "I'm sorry for our team: Dindo, Tom, the engineers and the mechanics. They did a perfect job throughout the race. Despite a few problems we were in contention for victory up to my accident."[94] Capello revealed that he said to McNish that the crash could have occurred to any driver, "For sure I felt disappointed when I saw the car in the wall, but as a driver immediately my thoughts went to Allan because I know he was giving 100% to try to close the gap as much as possible to the #1 car."[95]

Davidson was flown back to his home in Oxford on 20 June to begin a three-month recovery period.[96] He attributed the design of his race seat and head rest to saving him from paralysis, "It held me, supported me and arguably was the thing that saved me from further compression and maybe the worst case scenario of being paralysed now instead. When you look at everything involved, I think I got away with it the lightest I was ever going to."[97] Members of the Toyota team went to the Nissan garage to apologise for the collision that resulted in the retirement of the DeltaWing.[98] The team principal, Pascal Vasselon, stated Toyota's pace in the first half of the race was a realistic of what it could achieve, "We were not looking for an aggressive start and leading for 10 minutes.I know some people were expecting us to try to do that at the start, but no. The drivers knew they had to be safe at the start, then at the beginning the balance was not perfect. It was changing, the track was changing. We started on a very green track [because of the rain overnight] and it's important to be balanced for when the grip builds up, that was our target."[99]

Due to the result of the event, McNish, Kristensen and Capello moved to the lead of the Drivers' Championship with 77 points, 6½ ahead of the race winners Lotterer, Fässler and Tréluyer in second place. Dumas and Duval fell from first to third with 67 points, Gené stood in fourth position with 49 points and the Rebellion trio of Nick Heidfeld, Jani and Nico Prost rounded out the top five with 42½.[7] Audi continued to maintain their lead over the non-scoring Toyota in the Manufacturers' Championship with five races left in the season.[7]

Race classificationEdit

Class winners are marked in bold and  . Cars failing to complete 70% of winner's distance (264 laps) are marked as Not Classified (NC).[100]

Pos Class No. Team Drivers Chassis Tyre Laps Time
Engine
1 LMP1 1   Audi Sport Team Joest   André Lotterer
  Marcel Fässler
  Benoît Tréluyer
Audi R18 e-tron quattro M 378 24:01'16.128 
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Hybrid Diesel)
2 LMP1 2   Audi Sport Team Joest   Allan McNish
  Rinaldo Capello
  Tom Kristensen
Audi R18 e-tron quattro M 377 +1 Lap
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Hybrid Diesel)
3 LMP1 4   Audi Sport North America   Oliver Jarvis
  Marco Bonanomi
  Mike Rockenfeller
Audi R18 ultra M 375 +3 Laps
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Diesel)
4 LMP1 12   Rebellion Racing   Nico Prost
  Nick Heidfeld
  Neel Jani
Lola B12/60 M 367 +11 Laps
Toyota RV8KLM 3.4 L V8
5 LMP1 3   Audi Sport Team Joest   Marc Gené
  Romain Dumas
  Loïc Duval
Audi R18 ultra M 366 +12 Laps
Audi TDI 3.7 L Turbo V6
(Diesel)
6 LMP1 22   JRM   David Brabham
  Peter Dumbreck
  Karun Chandhok
HPD ARX-03a M 357 +21 Laps
Honda LM-V8 3.4 L V8
7 LMP2 44   Starworks Motorsport   Enzo Potolicchio
  Ryan Dalziel
  Tom Kimber-Smith
HPD ARX-03b D 354 +24 Laps 
Honda HR28TT 2.8 L Turbo V6
8 LMP2 46   Thiriet by TDS Racing   Pierre Thiriet
  Mathias Beche
  Christophe Tinseau
Oreca 03 D 353 +25 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
9 LMP2 49   Pecom Racing   Luís Pérez Companc
  Pierre Kaffer
  Soheil Ayari
Oreca 03 D 352 +26 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
10 LMP2 26   Signatech-Nissan   Pierre Ragues
  Nelson Panciatici
  Roman Rusinov
Oreca 03 D 351 +27 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
11 LMP1 13   Rebellion Racing   Andrea Belicchi
  Jeroen Bleekemolen
  Harold Primat
Lola B12/60 M 350 +28 Laps
Toyota RV8KLM 3.4 L V8
12 LMP2 41   Greaves Motorsport   Christian Zugel
  Elton Julian
  Ricardo González
Zytek Z11SN D 348 +30 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
13 LMP2 25   ADR-Delta   John Martin
  Tor Graves
  Jan Charouz
Oreca 03 D 346 +32 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
14 LMP2 35   OAK Racing   David Heinemeier Hansson
  Bas Leinders
  Maxime Martin
Morgan LMP2 D 341 +37 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
15 LMP2 42   Greaves Motorsport   Alex Brundle
  Martin Brundle
  Lucas Ordóñez
Zytek Z11SN D 340 +38 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
16 LMP2 23   Signatech-Nissan   Jordan Tresson
  Franck Mailleux
  Olivier Lombard
Oreca 03 D 340 +38 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
17 LMGTE
Pro
51   AF Corse   Giancarlo Fisichella
  Gianmaria Bruni
  Toni Vilander
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 336 +42 Laps 
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
18 LMGTE
Pro
59   Luxury Racing   Frédéric Makowiecki
  Jaime Melo
  Dominik Farnbacher
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 333 +45 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
19 LMGTE
Pro
97   Aston Martin Racing   Stefan Mücke
  Adrián Fernández
  Darren Turner
Aston Martin Vantage GTE M 332 +46 Laps
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
20 LMGTE
Am
50   Larbre Compétition   Patrick Bornhauser
  Julien Canal
  Pedro Lamy
Chevrolet Corvette C6.R M 329 +49 Laps 
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
21 LMGTE
Am
67   IMSA Performance Matmut   Anthony Pons
  Nicolas Armindo
  Raymond Narac
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 328 +50 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
22 LMGTE
Pro
71   AF Corse   Andrea Bertolini
  Olivier Beretta
  Marco Cioci
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 326 +52 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
23 LMGTE
Pro
73   Corvette Racing   Antonio García
  Jan Magnussen
  Jordan Taylor
Chevrolet Corvette C6.R M 326 +52 Laps
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
24 LMP2 45   Boutsen Ginion Racing   Bastien Brière
  Shinji Nakano
  Jens Petersen
Oreca 03 D 325 +53 Laps
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
25 LMGTE
Am
57   Krohn Racing   Tracy Krohn
  Niclas Jönsson
  Michele Rugolo
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 D 323 +55 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
26 LMP2 40   Race Performance   Michel Frey
  Jonathan Hirschi
  Ralph Meichtry
Oreca 03 D 320 +58 Laps
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
27 LMGTE
Am
79   Flying Lizard Motorsports   Seth Neiman
  Spencer Pumpelly
  Patrick Pilet
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 313 +65 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
28 LMGTE
Am
70   Larbre Compétition   Christophe Bourret
  Pascal Gibon
  Jean-Philippe Belloc
Chevrolet Corvette C6.R M 309 +69 Laps
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
29 LMP2 43   Extrême Limite ARIC   Fabien Rosier
  Phillipe Haezebrouck
  Philippe Thirion
Norma MP200P D 308 +70 Laps
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
30 LMP1 21   Strakka Racing   Nick Leventis
  Jonny Kane
  Danny Watts
HPD ARX-03a M 303 +75 Laps
Honda LM-V8 3.4 L V8
31 LMGTE
Am
61   AF Corse-Waltrip   Robert Kauffman
  Brian Vickers
  Rui Águas
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 294 +84 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
32 LMGTE
Am
83   JMB Racing   Manuel Rodrigues
  Philippe Illiano
  Alain Ferté
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 292 +86 Laps
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
33 LMGTE
Am
55   JWA-Avila   Paul Daniels
  Joël Camathias
  Markus Palttala
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR P 290 +88 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
NC LMGTE
Pro
74   Corvette Racing   Oliver Gavin
  Richard Westbrook
  Tommy Milner
Chevrolet Corvette C6.R M 215 Not classified
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
NC LMP1 17   Pescarolo Team   Nicolas Minassian
  Sébastien Bourdais
  Seiji Ara
Dome S102.5 M 203 Not classified
Judd DB 3.4 L V8
DNF LMP2 38   Jota   Sam Hancock
  Simon Dolan
  Haruki Kurosawa
Zytek Z11SN D 271 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 33   Level 5 Motorsports   Scott Tucker
  Christophe Bouchut
  Luis Díaz
HPD ARX-03b D 240 Fuel
Honda HR28TT 2.8 L Turbo V6
DNF LMP2 30   Status Grand Prix   Alexander Sims
  Yelmer Buurman
  Romain Iannetta
Lola B12/80 D 239 Retired
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
88   Team Felbermayr-Proton   Christian Ried
  Gianluca Roda
  Paolo Ruberti
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 222 Retired
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMP1 15   OAK Racing   Franck Montagny
  Dominik Kraihamer
  Bertrand Baguette
OAK Pescarolo 01 D 219 Engine
Judd DB 3.4 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
66   JMW Motorsport   Jonny Cocker
  James Walker
  Roger Wills
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 D 204 Retired
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 48   Murphy Prototypes   Jody Firth
  Warren Hughes
  Brendon Hartley
Oreca 03 D 196 Suspension/Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
77   Team Felbermayr-Proton   Richard Lietz
  Marc Lieb
  Wolf Henzler
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 185 Retired
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMGTE
Am
75   Prospeed Competition   Abdulaziz Al-Faisal
  Bret Curtis
  Sean Edwards
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 180 Accident
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMP2 31   Lotus   Thomas Holzer
  Mirco Schultis
  Luca Moro
Lola B12/80 D 155 Gearbox
Lotus (Judd) 3.6 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
58   Luxury Racing   Pierre Ehret
  Gunnar Jeannette
  Frankie Montecalvo
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 146 Accident damage
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 24   OAK Racing   Jacques Nicolet
  Matthieu Lahaye
  Olivier Pla
Morgan LMP2 D 139 Oil pump
Judd HK 3.6 L V8
DNF LMP1 7   Toyota Racing   Alexander Wurz
  Kazuki Nakajima
  Nicolas Lapierre
Toyota TS030 Hybrid M 134 Engine
Toyota 3.4 L V8
(Hybrid)
DNF LMGTE
Pro
80   Flying Lizard Motorsports   Jörg Bergmeister
  Marco Holzer
  Patrick Long
Porsche 997 GT3-RSR M 114 Accident damage
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMP2 28   Gulf Racing Middle East   Fabien Giroix
  Ludovic Badey
  Stefan Johansson
Lola B12/80 D 92 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP1 8   Toyota Racing   Anthony Davidson
  Sébastien Buemi
  Stéphane Sarrazin
Toyota TS030 Hybrid M 82 Accident
Toyota 3.4 L V8
(Hybrid)
DNF CDNT 0   Highcroft Racing   Marino Franchitti
  Michael Krumm
  Satoshi Motoyama
DeltaWing M 75 Accident
Nissan 1.6 L Turbo I4
DNF LMGTE
Am
81   AF Corse   Piergiuseppe Perazzini
  Niki Cadei
  Matt Griffin
Ferrari 458 Italia GT2 M 70 Accident
Ferrari 4.5 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
99   Aston Martin Racing   Christoffer Nygaard
  Kristian Poulsen
  Allan Simonsen
Aston Martin Vantage GTE M 31 Accident damage
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP1 16   Pescarolo Team   Emmanuel Collard
  Stuart Hall
Pescarolo 03 M 20 Power steering
Judd DB 3.4 L V8
DNF LMP2 29   Gulf Racing Middle East   Keiko Ihara
  Jean-Denis Délétraz
  Marc Rostan
Lola B12/80 D 17 Accident
Nissan VK45DE 4.5 L V8
Source:[100]

Championship standings after the raceEdit

  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for the Drivers' Championship standings.

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit


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