2011 World Figure Skating Championships

The 2011 World Figure Skating Championships was a senior international figure skating competition in the 2010–11 season. Medals were awarded in the disciplines of men's singles, ladies' singles, pair skating, and ice dancing.

2011 World Figure Skating Championships
2011 WFSC 3d 291 Opening ceremony.JPG
Opening ceremony
Type:ISU Championship
Date:April 25 – May 1
Season:2010–11
Location:Moscow, Russia
Venue:Megasport Arena
Champions
Men's singles:
Canada Patrick Chan
Ladies' singles:
Japan Miki Ando
Pair skating:
Germany Aliona Savchenko / Robin Szolkowy
Ice dance:
United States Meryl Davis / Charlie White
Navigation
Previous:
2010 World Championships
Next:
2012 World Championships

The competition was originally assigned to Nagano, Japan,[1] and later moved to Tokyo, to be held from March 21–27 at the Yoyogi National Gymnasium with the Japan Skating Federation as the host organization.[2] It was postponed in the wake of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami and later reassigned to Moscow, Russia.[3]

Reaction to the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunamiEdit

Immediately following the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami that occurred on March 11, 2011, the JSF reported to the ISU that the competition venue was undamaged and the event would be held as planned.[4][5] However, on March 13, the ISU released a statement saying that it was considering canceling the event and, later that day, the German skating federation announced that it would not send any skaters to the World Championships, with other countries undecided.[6] Although most foreign skaters had planned to fly to Japan from March 16 and later,[6][7] a few had already arrived in the country on March 11, among them European champion Florent Amodio, and were advised to return home by their skating federations, based on governmental travel advisories.[8]

On March 14, 2011, the ISU published a statement that 2011 Worlds would not be held in Tokyo during the dates originally planned, and that a decision regarding rescheduling or a complete cancellation would be made after further evaluation.[9] The ISU began considering various possibilities, including holding the event in another country.[10] ISU President Ottavio Cinquanta suggested the event could be canceled or postponed until October,[11] with the ISU saying they would make an announcement by March 21.[12] The JSF head, Seiko Hashimoto, said that her federation was hoping to reschedule the event to September or October,[13] but Japanese skating fans felt moving it to another country would be a better option.[14] Although it would oblige a number of skaters to back out of agreements to appear in skating tours, an important source of income for many,[15] many coaches and officials voiced their preference for April–May, citing greater complications arising from an autumn Worlds.[16][17][18] However, others noted it would be very difficult for a new host to organize the event in under a month.[19] Typically, a host country of a World Championships has over two years and the shortest period was in 2000 when France organized the event in seven months. On March 21, the ISU announced that the JSF had relinquished its hosting rights and that it was looking into alternate locations,[20] while noting there would be major logistical challenges to organize the event on short notice.[21] The criteria for new candidate hosts included a start date in April or May, 700 hotel rooms, a television production, and two rinks: A competition rink with a minimum 8000 seats and available from the Thursday early morning through Sunday late evening of the following week, and a practice rink from Friday early morning through Friday late evening of the following week.[22] Local expertise, good transportation infrastructure,[23] and quick visa processing were also important factors. ISU President Ottavio Cinquanta said he would support a bid by the Japanese federation to host the 2015 World Championships.[24] In June 2011, Japan was chosen as host for the 2014 World Championships at Saitama.[25]

Bids for re-voteEdit

On March 22, 2011, the International Skating Union announced that six candidates had applied to host the relocated championships.[26]

On March 24, 2011, the ISU announced that Moscow's Megasport Arena had been chosen as the replacement host for the 2011 World Figure Skating Championships.[15][27]

Competition notesEdit

Russia pledged to speed up processing of visas and Vladimir Putin dismissed concerns about the cost of organizing the event on short notice.[27][28] The country had also accepted hosting duties of the World Pentathlon Championships after political instability caused Egypt to step down.[28] The city of Moscow expected to spend 200 million rubles (5 million euros or US$7 million) on the event.[29]

2010 bronze medalist Laura Lepistö withdrew in early March due to a back injury and was replaced by Juulia Turkkila.[30] Shawn Sawyer dropped out due to a scheduling conflict and was replaced by Kevin Reynolds, while Myriane Samson withdrew due to a knee injury and was replaced by Amelie Lacoste.[31] Sinead Kerr and John Kerr dropped out to recover from shoulder surgery,[32] and later announced their retirement.

QualificationEdit

The event was open to figure skaters from ISU member nations who had reached the age of 15 by July 1, 2010. Based on the results of the 2010 World Figure Skating Championships, each country was allowed between one and three entries per discipline. National associations selected their entries based on their own criteria.

Countries which qualified more than one country per discipline:

Spots Men Ladies Pairs Dance
3   Canada
  Japan
  United States
  Japan
  China
  Russia
  Canada
  United States
2   Belgium
  Czech Republic
  France
  Italy
  Sweden
  Canada
  Finland
  Italy
  Russia
  South Korea
  Sweden
  United States
  Canada
  Germany
  United States
  France
  Hungary
  Israel
  Italy
  Russia
  Great Britain

Due to the large number of competitors, the men's, ladies', and ice dancing competitions required a preliminary round prior to the main competition. The top 12 men and ladies advanced to the short program and the top 10 ice dancing teams advanced to the short dance.

EntriesEdit

195 athletes from 44 countries were scheduled to participate.[33]

Country Men Ladies Pairs Ice dancing
  Armenia Sarkis Hayrapetyan
  Australia Mark Webster Cheltzie Lee Danielle O'Brien / Gregory Merriman
  Austria Viktor Pfeifer Belinda Schönberger Stina Martini / Severin Kiefer Kira Geil / Tobias Eisenbauer
  Belarus Vitali Luchanok Lubov Bakirova / Mikalai Kamianchuk Lesia Valadzenkava / Vitali Vakunov
  Belgium Jorik Hendrickx
Kevin van der Perren
Ira Vannut
  Bulgaria Georgi Kenchadze Hristina Vassileva Alexandra Malakhova / Leri Kenchadze Kristina Tremasova / Dimitar Lichev
  Canada Patrick Chan
Joey Russell
Kevin Reynolds
Cynthia Phaneuf
Amélie Lacoste
Meagan Duhamel / Eric Radford
Kirsten Moore-Towers / Dylan Moscovitch
Vanessa Crone / Paul Poirier
Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir
Kaitlyn Weaver / Andrew Poje
  China Song Nan Geng Bingwa Dong Huibo / Wu Yiming
Pang Qing / Tong Jian
Zhang Yue / Wang Lei
Huang Xintong / Zheng Xun
  Chinese Taipei Jordan Ju Melinda Wang
  Czech Republic Michal Březina
Tomáš Verner
Klára Kadlecová / Petr Bidař Lucie Myslivečková / Matěj Novák
  Denmark Justus Strid Karina Sinding Johnson Katelyn Good / Nikolaj Sorensen
  Estonia Jelena Glebova Natalya Zabiyako / Sergei Kulbach
  Finland Bela Papp Kiira Korpi
Juulia Turkkila
  France Florent Amodio
Brian Joubert
Maé Bérénice Méité Adeline Canac / Yannick Bonheur Pernelle Carron / Lloyd Jones
Nathalie Péchalat / Fabian Bourzat
  Georgia Elene Gedevanishvili Allison Reed / Otar Japaridze
  Germany Peter Liebers Sarah Hecken Maylin Hausch / Daniel Wende
Aliona Savchenko / Robin Szolkowy
Nelli Zhiganshina / Alexander Gazsi
  Great Britain David Richardson Jenna McCorkell Stacey Kemp / David King Penny Coomes / Nicholas Buckland
Louise Walden / Owen Edwards
  Greece Georgia Glastris
  Hong Kong Harry Hau Yin Lee Tiffany Packard Yu
  Hungary Tigran Vardanjan Viktória Pavuk Dora Turoczi / Balazs Major
Zsuzsanna Nagy / Máté Fejes
  Ireland Clara Peters
  Israel Maxim Shipov Danielle Montalbano / Evgeni Krasnapolski Brooke Frieling / Lionel Rumi
  Italy Paolo Bacchini
Samuel Contesti
Carolina Kostner
Roberta Rodeghiero
Stefania Berton / Ondřej Hotárek Anna Cappellini / Luca Lanotte
Charlene Guignard / Marco Fabbri
  Japan Takahiko Kozuka
Nobunari Oda
Daisuke Takahashi
Miki Ando
Mao Asada
Kanako Murakami
Narumi Takahashi / Mervin Tran Cathy Reed / Chris Reed
  Luxembourg Fleur Maxwell
  Kazakhstan Denis Ten
  Lithuania Isabella Tobias / Deividas Stagniūnas
  Mexico Mary Ro Reyes Corenne Bruhns / Benjamin Westenberger
  Monaco Kim Lucine
  Philippines Mericien Venzon
  Romania Sabina Măriuţă
  Russia Artur Gachinski Alena Leonova
Ksenia Makarova
Vera Bazarova / Yuri Larionov
Yuko Kavaguti / Alexander Smirnov
Tatiana Volosozhar / Maxim Trankov
Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev
Elena Ilinykh / Nikita Katsalapov
  Serbia Marina Seeh
  Slovenia Dasa Grm
  South Africa Lejeanne Marais
  South Korea Kim Min-seok Kim Yuna
Kwak Min-jeong
  Spain Javier Fernández Sonia Lafuente Sara Hurtado / Adrià Díaz
  Sweden Alexander Majorov
Adrian Schultheiss
Joshi Helgesson
Viktoria Helgesson
   Switzerland Mikael Redin Bettina Heim Ramona Elsener / Florian Roost
  Thailand Taryn Jurgensen
  Turkey Kutay Eryoldaş Birce Atabey
  Ukraine Anton Kovalevski Irina Movchan Siobhan Heekin-Canedy / Alexander Shakalov
  United States Ryan Bradley
Richard Dornbush
Ross Miner
Alissa Czisny
Rachael Flatt
Amanda Evora / Mark Ladwig
Caitlin Yankowskas / John Coughlin
Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein
Meryl Davis / Charlie White
Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani
  Uzbekistan Misha Ge

ScheduleEdit

(Moscow time, UTC+4)[34]

  • Sunday, April 24
    • Official practices
  • Monday, April 25
    • 14:00 Qualification round: Men
  • Tuesday, April 26
    • 12:00 Qualification round: Ice dancing
    • 15:30 Qualification round: Ladies
  • Wednesday, April 27
    • 13:00 Men's short program
    • 18:30 Pairs short program
  • Thursday, April 28
    • 13:30 Men's free skating
    • 18:30 Pairs free skating
  • Friday, April 29
    • 13:30 Ladies short program
    • 18:30 Short dance
  • Saturday, April 30
    • 13:30 Ladies' free skating
    • 18:30 Free dance
  • Sunday, May 1
    • 14:00 Exhibitions

ResultsEdit

PR: Preliminary round

MenEdit

Patrick Chan won the short program with a record score, while Nobunari Oda placed second and defending champion, Daisuke Takahashi, third.[35][36] Chan also set record free skating and total scores to win his first World title,[37][38] after previously winning two silvers. Takahiko Kozuka won his first medal at the World Championships, his previous best result being 6th in 2009. Artur Gachinski, the 2010 Junior World bronze medalist, won the bronze medal, becoming the first men's skater to medal at his senior Worlds debut since Evan Lysacek had done so in 2005; both won a bronze medal in Moscow.[39]

In the men's free skating, Brian Joubert slashed his hand on his skate blade and left drops of blood all over the ice;[40] he completed the program but later required medical attention. Also during the free skating, a screw in Daisuke Takahashi's skate came loose on his first jump.[41] He was able to get it repaired and resumed his program within the three minutes allowed. Oda ruined his chances of a medal by doing an extra triple jump, resulting in a loss of 13 points.[37] Florent Amodio used music with lyrics, which is not allowed in competitive skating with the exception of ice dancing. He was not given the normally required one-point penalty because not enough judges voted for it.[37]

Rank Name Nation Total points PR SP FS
1 Patrick Chan   Canada 280.98 1 93.02 1 187.96
2 Takahiko Kozuka   Japan 258.41 1 165.00 6 77.62 2 180.79
3 Artur Gachinski   Russia 241.86 4 78.34 3 163.52
4 Michal Březina   Czech Republic 233.61 3 130.87 7 77.50 5 156.11
5 Daisuke Takahashi   Japan 232.97 3 80.25 6 152.72
6 Nobunari Oda   Japan 232.50 2 81.81 9 150.69
7 Florent Amodio   France 229.68 5 77.64 7 152.04
8 Brian Joubert   France 227.67 9 71.29 4 156.38
9 Richard Dornbush   United States 222.42 11 70.54 8 151.88
10 Javier Fernández   Spain 218.26 14 69.16 10 149.10
11 Ross Miner   United States 217.93 13 70.40 11 147.53
12 Tomáš Verner   Czech Republic 216.87 8 75.94 13 140.93
13 Ryan Bradley   United States 212.71 12 70.45 12 142.26
14 Denis Ten   Kazakhstan 209.99 10 71.00 14 138.99
15 Peter Liebers   Germany 205.59 4 129.89 16 67.73 15 137.86
16 Anton Kovalevski   Ukraine 201.64 17 65.16 16 136.48
17 Kevin van der Perren   Belgium 197.10 15 68.34 18 128.76
18 Samuel Contesti   Italy 196.40 18 64.59 17 131.81
19 Jorik Hendrickx   Belgium 188.24 10 109.59 22 60.74 19 127.50
20 Kevin Reynolds   Canada 187.23 19 64.36 21 122.87
21 Paolo Bacchini   Italy 183.13 6 122.29 23 58.96 20 124.17
22 Song Nan   China 176.09 20 63.78 23 112.31
23 Kim Lucine   Monaco 171.93 8 117.78 24 58.81 22 113.12
24 Joey Russell   Canada 168.73 7 118.37 21 61.69 24 107.04
Did not advance to free skating
25 Adrian Schultheiss   Sweden 25 58.41
26 Viktor Pfeifer   Austria 5 123.22 26 56.68
27 Kim Min-seok   South Korea 12 98.67 27 56.19
28 Alexander Majorov   Sweden 2 136.64 28 54.24
29 Maxim Shipov   Israel 9 116.42 29 50.10
30 Misha Ge   Uzbekistan 11 109.39 30 49.61
Did not advance to short program
31 Mark Webster   Australia 13 95.84
32 Justus Strid   Denmark 14 95.16
33 David Richardson   Great Britain 15 93.20
34 Tigran Vardanjan   Hungary 16 91.16
35 Mikael Redin    Switzerland 17 90.79
36 Kutay Eryoldas   Turkey 18 86.60
37 Stephen Li-Chung Kuo   Chinese Taipei 19 85.71
38 Bela Papp   Finland 20 83.47
39 Harry Hau Yin Lee   Hong Kong 39 82.39
40 Vitali Luchanok   Belarus 40 81.51
41 Sarkis Hayrapetyan   Armenia 41 77.25
42 Georgi Kenchadze   Bulgaria 42 73.72

LadiesEdit

2010 Olympic champion Kim Yuna won the short program while Miki Ando placed second.[42][43] Ando was first in the free skating to win her second World gold medal, her previous title being in 2007.[44] Kim won her fifth World medal, silver, while Carolina Kostner won her third medal, a bronze. Kostner had also won the bronze in 2005, the previous time the event had been held in Moscow.[45] The 2010 World champion, Mao Asada, was sixth.

Rank Name Nation Total points PR SP FS
1 Miki Ando   Japan 195.79 2 65.58 1 130.21
2 Kim Yuna   South Korea 194.50 1 65.91 2 128.59
3 Carolina Kostner   Italy 184.68 6 59.75 3 124.93
4 Alena Leonova   Russia 183.92 5 59.75 4 124.17
5 Alissa Czisny   United States 182.25 4 61.47 5 120.78
6 Mao Asada   Japan 172.79 7 58.66 6 114.13
7 Ksenia Makarova   Russia 167.22 3 61.62 9 105.60
8 Kanako Murakami   Japan 167.10 10 54.86 7 112.24
9 Kiira Korpi   Finland 164.80 9 55.09 8 109.71
10 Elene Gedevanishvili   Georgia 156.24 15 51.61 10 104.63
11 Sarah Hecken   Germany 155.83 12 52.73 11 103.10
12 Rachael Flatt   United States 154.61 8 57.22 14 97.39
13 Cynthia Phaneuf   Canada 152.78 13 52.62 12 100.16
14 Maé Bérénice Méité   France 150.44 1 98.88 11 53.26 15 97.18
15 Joshi Helgesson   Sweden 149.08 2 91.70 16 50.25 13 98.83
16 Amélie Lacoste   Canada 144.76 5 87.04 14 51.98 18 92.78
17 Viktoria Helgesson   Sweden 142.52 24 45.40 16 97.12
18 Bingwa Geng   China 140.78 19 47.89 17 92.89
19 Ira Vannut   Belgium 138.28 4 90.29 17 49.34 20 89.05
20 Juulia Turkkila   Finland 136.68 6 86.49 22 45.70 19 90.98
21 Cheltzie Lee   Australia 133.65 18 48.20 21 85.45
22 Jelena Glebova   Estonia 124.78 9 76.13 20 46.28 22 78.50
23 Irina Movchan   Ukraine 123.15 10 75.96 23 45.68 23 77.47
24 Jenna McCorkell   Great Britain 121.76 21 45.99 24 75.77
Did not advance to free skating
25 Sonia Lafuente   Spain 3 91.17 25 44.59
26 Karina Johnson   Denmark 7 78.52 26 42.19
27 Bettina Heim    Switzerland 12 72.74 27 37.23
28 Daša Grm   Slovenia 8 77.42 28 36.63
29 Belinda Schönberger   Austria 11 75.85 29 35.73
30 Viktória Pavuk   Hungary 30 33.70
Did not advance to short program
31 Roberta Rodeghiero   Italy 13 71.83
32 Sabina Măriuţă   Romania 14 68.63
33 Kwak Min-jeong   South Korea 15 67.75
34 Birce Atabey   Turkey 16 67.11
35 Mericien Venzon   Philippines 17 66.94
36 Lejeanne Marais   South Africa 18 65.99
37 Hristina Vassileva   Bulgaria 19 65.26
38 Melinda Wang   Chinese Taipei 20 63.32
39 Clara Peters   Ireland 21 60.94
40 Taryn Jurgensen   Thailand 22 57.75
41 Mary Ro Reyes   Mexico 23 54.99
42 Georgia Glastris   Greece 24 52.38
43 Marina Seeh   Serbia 25 52.20
44 Tiffany Packard Yu   Hong Kong WD 51.72

PairsEdit

Defending champions, Pang Qing / Tong Jian, were first after the short program, with Aliona Savchenko / Robin Szolkowy in second, and new Russian team, Tatiana Volosozhar / Maxim Trankov, in third.[46] Savchenko and Szolkowy then won the free skating to win their third World title, reclaiming the crown they lost in 2010 and setting a new record score in the free skating and overall.[47] They became Germany's second most successful pair at the event after Maxi Herber and Ernst Baier who won four World titles in the 1930s. Volosozhar and Trankov medaled after only a year together and at their first major international competition. Pang and Tong took the bronze.

In the short program, Eric Radford's nose was broken when Meagan Duhamel's elbow hit him on the descent from a twist, their first element, but they completed the program without a break;[48][49] the pair were able to compete in the free skating, and finished seventh overall.

Rank Name Nation Total points SP FS
1 Aliona Savchenko / Robin Szolkowy   Germany 217.85 2 72.98 1 144.87
2 Tatiana Volosozhar / Maxim Trankov   Russia 211.73 3 70.35 2 140.38
3 Pang Qing / Tong Jian   China 204.12 1 74.00 3 130.12
4 Yuko Kavaguti / Alexander Smirnov   Russia 187.36 5 62.54 4 124.82
5 Vera Bazarova / Yuri Larionov   Russia 187.13 4 64.64 5 122.49
6 Caitlin Yankowskas / John Coughlin   United States 175.94 8 58.76 6 117.18
7 Meagan Duhamel / Eric Radford   Canada 173.03 7 58.83 7 114.20
8 Kirsten Moore-Towers / Dylan Moscovitch   Canada 163.17 10 56.86 8 106.31
9 Narumi Takahashi / Mervin Tran   Japan 160.10 6 59.16 10 100.94
10 Stefania Berton / Ondřej Hotárek   Italy 157.15 9 57.63 11 99.52
11 Amanda Evora / Mark Ladwig   United States 155.91 11 54.64 9 101.27
12 Maylin Hausch / Daniel Wende   Germany 149.65 12 53.90 12 95.75
13 Zhang Yue / Wang Lei   China 147.38 13 52.25 13 95.13
14 Dong Huibo / Wu Yiming   China 137.75 14 49.29 14 88.46
15 Klára Kadlecová / Petr Bidař   Czech Republic 132.51 15 45.20 15 87.31
16 Natalya Zabiyako / Sergei Kulbach   Estonia 126.56 16 44.35 16 82.21
Did not advance to free skating
17 Stacey Kemp / David King   Great Britain 17 44.14
18 Adeline Canac / Yannick Bonheur   France 18 43.92
19 Lubov Bakirova / Mikalai Kamianchuk   Belarus 19 38.20
20 Danielle Montalbano / Evgeni Krasnopolski   Israel 20 37.43
21 Stina Martini / Severin Kiefer   Austria 21 35.34
22 Alexandra Malakhova / Leri Kenchadze   Bulgaria 22 30.10

Ice dancingEdit

The 2010 Olympic and World Champions, Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, set a new world record score in the short dance, while Grand Prix Final champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White were second and European champions, Nathalie Pechalat and Fabian Bourzat, were third.[50][51] Davis and White won the free dance to become the first ice dancers from the United States to win the World title.[52] Virtue and Moir took the silver while Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani won the bronze medal in their first trip to the senior World Championships. It was the first North American sweep of the World ice dancing podium.[53] All three medal-winning teams were led by Russian-born, American-based coaches, Igor Sphilband and Marina Zueva.[54] The rest of the top ten was also dominated by Russian coaches: Nathalie Péchalat / Fabian Bourzat (Alexander Zhulin and Oleg Volkov), Kaitlyn Weaver / Andrew Poje (Anjelika Krylova), Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev (Elena Kustarova and Svetlana Alexeeva), Elena Ilinykh / Nikita Katsalapov (Zhulin and Volkov), Anna Cappellini / Luca Lanotte (had gone to Nikolai Morozov a few months earlier) and Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein (Shpilband / Zueva). Vanessa Crone / Paul Poirier had one Canadian coach, Carol Lane, and one Soviet-born, Yuri Razguliaiev.

Rank Name Nation Total points PR SD FD
1 Meryl Davis / Charlie White   United States 185.27 2 73.76 1 111.51
2 Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir   Canada 181.79 1 74.29 2 107.50
3 Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani   United States 163.79 4 66.88 3 96.91
4 Nathalie Péchalat / Fabian Bourzat   France 163.54 3 70.97 6 92.57
5 Kaitlyn Weaver / Andrew Poje   Canada 160.32 1 87.22 7 65.07 4 95.25
6 Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev   Russia 160.23 5 65.88 5 94.35
7 Elena Ilinykh / Nikita Katsalapov   Russia 154.50 6 65.51 10 88.99
8 Anna Cappellini / Luca Lanotte   Italy 153.77 8 64.12 9 89.65
9 Madison Chock / Greg Zuerlein   United States 151.86 9 61.47 7 90.39
10 Vanessa Crone / Paul Poirier   Canada 151.13 10 61.01 8 90.12
11 Nelli Zhiganshina / Alexander Gazsi   Germany 140.95 2 83.67 12 55.53 11 85.42
12 Pernelle Carron / Lloyd Jones   France 140.86 11 57.68 12 83.18
13 Cathy Reed / Chris Reed   Japan 133.33 13 54.86 13 78.47
14 Isabella Tobias / Deividas Stagniūnas   Lithuania 131.01 3 77.63 14 53.16 14 77.85
15 Siobhan Heekin-Canedy / Alexander Shakalov   Ukraine 128.70 5 75.00 15 52.31 15 76.39
16 Penny Coomes / Nicholas Buckland   Great Britain 126.29 17 51.75 16 74.54
17 Huang Xintong / Zheng Xun   China 123.01 4 75.45 16 52.17 17 70.84
18 Allison Reed / Otar Japaridze   Georgia 120.11 6 70.90 19 49.44 18 70.67
19 Charlene Guignard / Marco Fabbri   Italy 120.02 18 49.80 19 70.22
20 Louise Walden / Owen Edwards   Great Britain 116.52 9 68.58 20 46.73 20 69.79
Did not advance to free dance
21 Dora Turoczi / Balazs Major   Hungary 21 45.41
22 Lucie Myslivečková / Matěj Novák   Czech Republic 8 68.96 22 45.02
23 Sara Hurtado / Adrià Díaz   Spain 7 70.26 23 44.98
24 Brooke Frieling / Lionel Rumi   Israel 24 44.43
25 Ramona Elsener / Florian Roost    Switzerland 10 67.94 25 41.58
Did not advance to short dance
26 Kira Geil / Tobias Eisenbauer   Austria 11 64.55
27 Danielle O'Brien / Gregory Merriman   Australia 12 63.57
28 Zsuzsanna Nagy / Máté Fejes   Hungary 13 58.70
29 Katelyn Good / Nikolaj Sorensen   Denmark 14 57.04
30 Corenne Bruhns / Benjamin Westenberger   Mexico 15 55.51
31 Kristina Tremasova / Dimitar Lichev   Bulgaria 16 55.37
32 Lesia Valadzenkava / Vitali Vakunov   Belarus 17 54.43

Medals summaryEdit

 
The men's medalists
 
The ladies' medalists
 
The pairs medalists
 
The ice dancing medalists with coaches Igor Shpilband and Marina Zueva.

MedalistsEdit

Medals for overall placement:

Discipline Gold Silver Bronze
Men   Patrick Chan   Takahiko Kozuka   Artur Gachinski
Ladies   Miki Ando   Kim Yuna   Carolina Kostner
Pair skating   Aliona Savchenko / Robin Szolkowy   Tatiana Volosozhar / Maxim Trankov   Pang Qing / Tong Jian
Ice dancing   Meryl Davis / Charlie White   Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir   Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani

Small medals for placement in the short segment:

Discipline Gold Silver Bronze
Men   Patrick Chan   Nobunari Oda   Daisuke Takahashi
Ladies   Kim Yuna   Miki Ando   Ksenia Makarova
Pair skating   Pang Qing / Tong Jian   Aliona Savchenko / Robin Szolkowy   Tatiana Volosozhar / Maxim Trankov
Ice dancing   Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir   Meryl Davis / Charlie White   Nathalie Pechalat / Fabian Bourzat

Small medals for placement in the free segment:

Discipline Gold Silver Bronze
Men   Patrick Chan   Takahiko Kozuka   Artur Gachinski
Ladies   Miki Ando   Kim Yuna   Carolina Kostner
Pair skating   Aliona Savchenko / Robin Szolkowy   Tatiana Volosozhar / Maxim Trankov   Pang Qing / Tong Jian
Ice dancing   Meryl Davis / Charlie White   Tessa Virtue / Scott Moir   Maia Shibutani / Alex Shibutani

Medals by countryEdit

Table of medals for overall placement:

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Canada (CAN)1102
  Japan (JPN)1102
3  United States (USA)1012
4  Germany (GER)1001
5  Russia (RUS)0112
6  South Korea (KOR)0101
7  China (CHN)0011
  Italy (ITA)0011
Totals (8 nations)44412

Table of small medals for placement in the short segment:

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Canada (CAN)2002
2  China (CHN)1001
  South Korea (KOR)1001
4  Japan (JPN)0213
5  Germany (GER)0101
  United States (USA)0101
7  Russia (RUS)0022
8  France (FRA)0011
Totals (8 nations)44412

Table of small medals for placement in the free segment:

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Canada (CAN)1102
  Japan (JPN)1102
3  United States (USA)1012
4  Germany (GER)1001
5  Russia (RUS)0112
6  South Korea (KOR)0101
7  China (CHN)0011
  Italy (ITA)0011
Totals (8 nations)44412

Prize moneyEdit

Prize money (US$)[55]
Placement Men's / Ladies' singles Pairs / Ice dancers
1st 45,000 67,500
2nd 27,000 40,500
3rd 18,000 27,000
4th 13,000 19,500
5th 10,000 15,000
6th 7,000 10,500
7th 6,000 9,000
8th 5,000 7,500
9th 3,500 5,250
10th 3,000 4,500
11th 2,500 3,750
12th 2,000 3,000
Pairs and ice dancing couples split the amount.
Total prize money: US$710,000.

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit