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2007 Open Championship

The 2007 Open Championship was a men's major golf championship and the 136th Open Championship, played from 19–22 July at Carnoustie Golf Links in Scotland. Pádraig Harrington defeated Sergio García in a playoff to take the title and his first major championship.[2]

2007 Open Championship
Tournament information
Dates19–22 July 2007
LocationAngus, Scotland
Course(s)Carnoustie Golf Links
Championship Course
Tour(s)European Tour
PGA Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par71[1]
Length7,421 yards (6,786 m)[1]
Field156 players, 70 after cut[1]
Cut146 (+4)[1]
Prize fund£4,200,000
6,158,474
$8,637,720
Winner's share£750,000
€1,106,618
$1,542,450
Champion
Republic of Ireland Pádraig Harrington
277 (−7), playoff
← 2006
2008 →
Carnoustie is located in Scotland
Carnoustie
Carnoustie
Location in Scotland
Carnoustie is located in Angus
Carnoustie
Carnoustie
Location in Angus, Scotland

A field of 156 players participated in the championship, and the purse was £4.2 million (an increase of £200,000 over 2006); the winner received £750,000 (an increase of £30,000 over 2006).[3] Using conversion rates at the time of the tournament, the purse was €6,158,474 for the European Tour's Order of Merit rankings and US$8,637,720 for the PGA Tour's money list.

Contents

History of The Open Championship at CarnoustieEdit

Carnoustie hosted its first Open Championship in 1931 and the 2007 Open was the seventh to be held at Carnoustie, and third consecutive to end in a playoff. Carnoustie's prestige in the golf community is irrefutable as the list of champions includes Tommy Armour (1931), Henry Cotton (1937), Ben Hogan (1953), Gary Player (1968), Tom Watson (1975) and Paul Lawrie (1999).

The 1999 championship was nicknamed "Carnastie" due to how difficult the course and conditions were. Jean van de Velde stood on the 72nd tee with a three-shot lead, needing only a double-bogey to win. He memorably triple-bogeyed the hole and went to a four-hole playoff with Lawrie and Justin Leonard, in which Lawrie prevailed. Watson's win in 1975, his first of five Open Championships (and eight majors), came after an 18-hole Sunday playoff with Jack Newton.

Course layoutEdit

Carnoustie Golf Links – Championship Course

Hole Name Yards Par Hole Name Yards Par
1 Cup 406 4 10 South America 466 4
2 Gulley 463 4 11 Dyke 383 4
3 Jockie's Burn 358 4 12 Southward Ho 499 4
4 Hillocks 412 4 13 Whins 176 3
5 Brae 415 4 14 Spectacles 514 5
6 Hogan's Alley ^ 578 5 15 Lucky Slap 472 4
7 Plantation 410 4 16 Barry Burn 248 3
8 Short 183 3 17 Island 461 4
9 Railway 478 4 18 Home 499 4
Out 3,703 36 In 3,718 35
Total 7,421 71

^ the 6th hole was named Long until 2003

Lengths of the course for previous Opens:[1]

FieldEdit

The field consisted of 156 golfers.[4] Seventy players made the 36-hole cut at 146 (+4) or better.

1. First 10 and anyone tying for 10th place in the 2006 Open Championship
Ángel Cabrera (3,4,5,9), Chris DiMarco (3,17), Ernie Els (2,3,4), Jim Furyk (3,9,13,17,21), Sergio García (3,4,17), Carl Pettersson (3,13), Andrés Romero, Adam Scott (3,13), Hideto Tanihara, Tiger Woods (2,3,10,11,13,17)

2. Past Open Champions aged 65 or under
Mark Calcavecchia, Ben Curtis, John Daly, Nick Faldo, Todd Hamilton, Tony Jacklin, Paul Lawrie, Tom Lehman, Justin Leonard, Sandy Lyle, Mark O'Meara

3. The first 50 players on the Official World Golf Rankings for 28 May 2007
Robert Allenby, Stephen Ames (12), Stuart Appleby (13), Aaron Baddeley, Chad Campbell (13,17), Paul Casey (4,17), K. J. Choi, Stewart Cink (13,17), Luke Donald (4,13,17), Joe Durant (13), Niclas Fasth (4), Retief Goosen (4,9,13), Anders Hansen (5), Pádraig Harrington (4,17), Charles Howell III, David Howell (4,5,17), Trevor Immelman (13), Zach Johnson (10,17), Robert Karlsson (4,17), Davis Love III (13), Phil Mickelson (10,11,12,13,17), Colin Montgomerie (4,17), Arron Oberholser, Geoff Ogilvy (9,13), Nick O'Hern (19), Rod Pampling (13), Ian Poulter (4), John Rollins, Justin Rose, Rory Sabbatini (13), Charl Schwartzel (4,20), Vijay Singh (11,13), Henrik Stenson (4,17), Richard Sterne, Steve Stricker, Vaughn Taylor (17), David Toms (13,17), Scott Verplank (17), Mike Weir (10), Lee Westwood (17), Brett Wetterich (13,17)

4. First 20 in the European Tour Final Order of Merit for 2006
John Bickerton, Thomas Bjørn, Paul Broadhurst, Johan Edfors, Jeev Milkha Singh (18), Anthony Wall

5. The BMW PGA Championship winners for 2005-2007

6. Top three players, not otherwise exempt, in the top 20 of the 2007 European Tour Order of Merit through 27 May
Markus Brier, Raphaël Jacquelin, Yang Yong-eun

7. Top two players, not otherwise exempt, with the most European Tour prize money from the Italian Open through the French Open, including the U. S. Open
Bradley Dredge, Graeme Storm

8. The leading player, not exempt having applied above, in the first 5 and ties of each of the 2007 European Open and the 2007 Barclays Scottish Open.
Pelle Edberg, Grégory Havret

9. The U.S. Open Champions for 2003–2007
Michael Campbell

10. The U.S. Masters Champions for 2003–2007

11. The U.S. PGA Champions for 2002–2006
Rich Beem, Shaun Micheel

12. The Players Champions for 2005–2007

13. Top 20 on the Official Money List of the 2006 PGA Tour
Brett Quigley

14. First 3 and anyone tying for 3rd place, not exempt having applied above, in the top 20 of the Official Money List of the 2007 PGA Tour on completion of the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial
Nick Watney, Boo Weekley

15. First 2 PGA Tour members and any PGA Tour members tying for 2nd place, not exempt, in a cumulative money list taken from The Players Championship and the five PGA Tour events leading up to and including the 2007 AT&T National
Hunter Mahan

16. The leading player, not exempt having applied above, in the first 5 and ties of each of the 2007 AT&T National and the 2007 John Deere Classic
Pat Perez, Jonathan Byrd

17. Playing members of the 2006 Ryder Cup teams
Darren Clarke, J. J. Henry, Paul McGinley

18. Winner of the Order of Merit of the Asian Tour for 2006

19. First 2 on the Order of Merit of the PGA Tour of Australasia for 2006
Kevin Stadler

20. Winner of the Order of Merit of the Sunshine Tour for 2006/07

21. The Canadian Open Champion for 2006

22. The Japan Open Champion for 2006
Paul Sheehan

23. First 2 on the Official Money List of the Japan Golf Tour for 2006
Toru Taniguchi

24. The leading 4 players, not exempt, in the 2007 Mizuno Open Yomiuri Classic
Lee Dong-hwan, Lee Seong-ho, Toshinori Muto, Achi Sato

25. First 2 and anyone tying for 2nd place, not exempt having applied (24) above, in a cumulative money list taken from all official Japan Golf Tour events from the 2007 Japan PGA Championship up to and including the 2007 Mizuno Open Yomiuri Classic
Tomohiro Kondo, Toshimitsu Izawa

26. The Senior British Open Champion for 2006
Loren Roberts

27. The 2007 Amateur Champion
Drew Weaver (a)

28. The U.S. Amateur Champion for 2006
Richie Ramsay (a)

29. The European Individual Amateur Champion for 2006
Rory McIlroy (a)

International Final Qualifying

Africa: Desvonde Botes, Adilson da Silva, Doug McGuigan, Terry Pilkadaris
Australasia: Ben Bunny, Peter Fowler, Scott Laycock, Ewan Porter
Asia: Ross Bain, David Gleeson, Adam Groom, Lam Chih Bing, Won Joon Lee
America: Brian Davis, Mark Hensby, Charley Hoffman, Anders Hultman, Jerry Kelly, Matt Kuchar, Spencer Levin, Ryan Moore, Sean O'Hair, Michael Putnam, John Senden, Duffy Waldorf
Europe: Fredrik Andersson Hed, Benn Barham, Grégory Bourdy, Peter Baker, Nick Dougherty, Mattias Eliasson, Ross Fisher, Alastair Forsyth, Mark Foster, David Frost, Peter Hanson, Miguel Ángel Jiménez, José-Filipe Lima, Graeme McDowell, Francesco Molinari, Oliver Wilson

Local Final Qualifying (Monday 9 July and Tuesday 10 July)

Downfield: Jon Bevan, Scott Drummond, David Higgins
Monifieth: Dave Coupland (a), Paul Waring (a), Llewellyn Matthews (a)
Montrose: Justin Kehoe, David Shacklady, Matthew Zions
Panmure: Kevin Harper, Steven Alker, Steve Parry

Alternates

Nationalities in the fieldEdit

North America (48) South America (3) Europe (62) Oceania (23) Asia (12) Africa (8)
  Canada (2)   Argentina (2)   England (25)   Australia (20)   India (1)   South Africa (8)
  United States (46)   Brazil (1)   Northern Ireland (3)   Fiji (1)   Japan (6)
  Scotland (8)   New Zealand (2)   Singapore (1)
  Wales (2)   South Korea (4)
  Ireland (4)
  Austria (1)
  Denmark (2)
  France (3)
  Italy (1)
  Portugal (1)
  Spain (2)
  Sweden (10)

Past champions in the fieldEdit

Made the cutEdit

Player Country Year(s) Won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Ernie Els   South Africa 2002 72 70 68 69 279 −5 T4
Ben Curtis   United States 2003 72 74 70 65 281 −3 T8
Tiger Woods   United States 2000, 2005, 2006 69 74 69 70 282 −2 T12
Mark Calcavecchia   United States 1989 74 70 72 69 285 +1 T23
Tom Lehman   United States 1996 73 73 74 73 293 +9 T51
Mark O'Meara   United States 1998 74 72 76 74 296 +12 T60
Sandy Lyle   Scotland 1985 73 73 73 79 298 +14 T65

Missed the cutEdit

Player Country Year(s) Won R1 R2 Total To par
Paul Lawrie   Scotland 1999 73 74 147 +5
Justin Leonard   United States 1997 74 73 147 +5
John Daly   United States 1995 74 76 150 +8
Nick Faldo   England 1987, 1990, 1992 79 73 152 +10
Todd Hamilton   United States 2004 81 72 153 +11
Tony Jacklin   England 1969 78 83 161 +19

Round summariesEdit

First roundEdit

Thursday, 19 July 2007

Sergio García led the field with a six-under 65;[5] eight years earlier in 1999, he shot 89 in the opening round at Carnoustie and missed the cut by eighteen strokes.[6] Amateur Rory McIlroy had the only bogey-free round on the day at 68 (−3); he qualified for the Open by winning the European Amateur Championship in 2006.

Tiger Woods began his campaign for a third straight Open Championship with a 69 (−2), including an eagle at Hogan's Alley, the famous 6th hole at Carnoustie. Paul McGinley was bogey-free until the 15th and 16th holes and carded a 67. John Daly suffered an incredible swoon, scoring −5 after three birdies and an eagle on 11, then had a double bogey at 12, triple bogey at 14, and three more bogeys on the way to a 74 (+3) for the round and went on to miss the cut. The scoring average on the day was 73.72 (+2.72).

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Sergio García   Spain 65 −6
2 Paul McGinley   Ireland 67 −4
T3 Markus Brier   Austria 68 −3
Ángel Cabrera   Argentina
Michael Campbell   New Zealand
Rory McIlroy (a)   Northern Ireland
Boo Weekley   United States
T8 K. J. Choi   South Korea 69 −2
Stewart Cink   United States
Pádraig Harrington   Ireland
Miguel Ángel Jiménez   Spain
Tiger Woods   United States

Source:[5]

Second roundEdit

Friday, 20 July 2007

First round leader Sergio García shot a level par 71 to stay at −6 and led by two strokes.[7] Amateur Rory McIlroy shot a 76 (+5) to drop to +2, tied for 31st going into the weekend. Paul McGinley's 75 (+4) dropped him to even par after starting the day in second place. Tiger Woods had a disappointing 74 (+3) which started with a double bogey on the first hole. Mike Weir shot the best round of the day with a 68 (−3), which moved him into a tie for third place. The 36-hole cut fluctuated until it settled at +4, and the scoring average for the second round was 74.10 (+3.10).

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Sergio García   Spain 65-71=136 −6
2 K. J. Choi   South Korea 69-69=138 −4
T3 Miguel Ángel Jiménez   Spain 69-70=139 −3
Mike Weir   Canada 71-68=139
T5 Jim Furyk   United States 70-70=140 −2
Boo Weekley   United States 68-72=140
T7 Ángel Cabrera   Argentina 68-73=141 −1
Alastair Forsyth   Scotland 70-71=141
Retief Goosen   South Africa 70-71=141
J. J. Henry   United States 70-71=141
Andrés Romero   Argentina 71-70=141
Lee Westwood   England 71-70=141

Amateurs: McIlroy (+2), Weaver (+6), Ramsay (+9), Coupland (+11), Waring (+12), Matthews (+16).

Notable players who missed the cutEdit

Player Country Score To par
Paul Lawrie   Scotland 73-74=147 +5
Justin Leonard   United States 74-73=147
Colin Montgomerie   Scotland 73-74=147
Henrik Stenson   Sweden 71-76=147
Phil Mickelson   United States 71-77=148 +6
David Toms   United States 71-77=148
Geoff Ogilvy   Australia 75-74=149 +7
John Daly   United States 74-76=150 +8
Davis Love III   United States 79-71=150

Source:[7]

Third roundEdit

Saturday, 21 July 2007

Sergio García's 68 (−3) extended his lead to three strokes and was now at 204 (−9) after 54 holes.[8] Paul McGinley rebounded with 68 (−3), three-under for the championship and tied for third place with six others. Tiger Woods shot a 69 (−2) which put him at −1 going into the weekend. At eight strokes behind the leader, his quest for a third straight Open Championship was improbable; he had never won a major when trailing after 54 holes.

The best round on Saturday was an amazing 64 (−7) by Steve Stricker, which was the lowest ever for an Open Championship round at Carnoustie. It also tied the course record (Alan Tait scored 64 during a pro-am in 1994, and Colin Montgomerie scored the same during the Scottish Open in 1995). Stricker birdied five of the first seven holes en route to a bogey-free round with seven birdies and climbed the leaderboard into solo second place, three strokes behind García. Chris DiMarco's 66 (−5) moved him into a tie for third at −3, six shots back. García had yet to win a major championship, and for the first time in his career, led a major after 54 holes. The only Spaniard to win the Open is hall of famer Seve Ballesteros, with three titles. The scoring average on Saturday was 71.61 (+0.61).

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Sergio García   Spain 65-71-68=204 −9
2 Steve Stricker   United States 71-72-64=207 −6
T3 Paul Broadhurst   England 71-71-68=210 −3
K. J. Choi   South Korea 69-69-72=210
Stewart Cink   United States 69-73-68=210
Chris DiMarco   United States 74-70-66=210
Ernie Els   South Africa 72-70-68=210
Pádraig Harrington   Ireland 69-73-68=210
Paul McGinley   Ireland 67-75-68=210
T10 Jim Furyk   United States 70-70-71=211 −2
Miguel Ángel Jiménez   Spain 69-70-72=211
Andrés Romero   Argentina 71-70-70=211
Vijay Singh   Fiji 72-71-68=211
Mike Weir   Canada 71-68-72=211

Source:[8]

Final roundEdit

Sunday, 22 July 2007

Another wild final round had numerous lead changes, and it came down to Sergio García, Andres Romero, and Pádraig Harrington in the final holes.[2] García struggled at times during his only over-par round of the tournament, but was still at 8-under (+1 for the day) entering the last couple of holes. Meanwhile, Harrington had four birdies followed by an eagle at the 14th hole to move to 9-under for the championship, and stood on the 18th tee with a one-shot lead. Harrington went into the Barry Burn twice, but salvaged a double-bogey six to finish with a round of 67 (−4), 7-under for the tournament. García, who now had a one-shot lead on the par-4 72nd hole, found a greenside bunker with his approach shot. He left himself a ten footer (3 m) for par and the title, but the putt lipped out and he had to settle for a playoff, scoring a 73 (+2) for the round.

Romero shot par or better in every round, and had ten birdies Sunday. He was at 9-under after 70 holes with a two-stroke lead, but the Argentine was done in by a double bogey-bogey ending to finish a single stroke out of the playoff. The best round of the day was by Richard Green who shot a 64 (−7). The Australian equalled the course record during an Open set the previous day by American Steve Stricker, and set the target in the clubhouse on 279. He began the day at +2 and his round put him in a tie for fourth. Rory McIlroy shot +1 on the day, +5 for the tournament, to finish tied 42nd and win the silver medal for top amateur in his first Open.[9] The scoring average on the day was 72.79 (+1.79).

Place Player Country Score To par Money (£)
T1 Pádraig Harrington   Ireland 69-73-68-67=277 −7 Playoff
Sergio García   Spain 65-71-68-73=277
3 Andrés Romero   Argentina 71-70-70-67=278 −6 290,000
T4 Ernie Els   South Africa 72-70-68-69=279 −5 200,000
Richard Green   Australia 72-73-70-64=279
T6 Stewart Cink   United States 69-73-68-70=280 −4 145,500
Hunter Mahan   United States 73-73-69-65=280
T8 K. J. Choi   South Korea 69-69-72-71=281 −3 94,750
Ben Curtis   United States 72-74-70-65=281
Steve Stricker   United States 71-72-64-74=281
Mike Weir   Canada 71-68-72-70=281

Source:[2][10]
Top amateur: Rory McIlroy (+5)

Full Leaderboard

ScorecardEdit

Final round

Hole  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 5 4 3 4 4
  Harrington −3 −3 −4 −4 −4 −5 −5 −5 −6 −6 −7 −7 −7 −9 −9 −9 −9 −7
  Garcia −9 −9 −10 −10 −9 −9 −8 −7 −7 −7 −7 −7 −8 −9 −8 −8 −8 −7
  Romero −2 −2 −3 −4 −4 −5 −5 −6 −5 −6 −7 −5 −6 −7 −8 −9 −7 −6
  Els −3 −4 −5 −5 −5 −6 −6 −6 −6 −6 −6 −6 −5 −6 −5 −5 −5 −5
  Green +2 +1 E E E −1 −1 −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −3 −5 −5 −5 −6 −5
  Stricker −6 −6 −6 −7 −6 −6 −6 −6 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −5 −4 −3 −3

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par

PlayoffEdit

 
Pádraig Harrington
at the 2007 Open Championship

Pádraig Harrington became the first Irishman to win the Open Championship in sixty years, defeating Sergio García in a playoff.[2] The four-hole aggregate playoff included holes 1, 16, 17, and 18. Harrington birdied the par-4 first hole while García bogeyed, a two-stroke edge. Both players parred the next two holes (García hit the pin on the par-3 16th but his ball rolled a distance away), so Harrington still led by two strokes heading into the dangerous 18th. Harrington played the hole more cautiously this time, and reached the green in three shots. García gave himself a chance by reaching the green in two, but his birdie putt burned the left edge. Harrington made his short bogey putt to become the first European winner of a major since Paul Lawrie of Scotland triumphed in a three-way playoff at Carnoustie in 1999; the win moved Harrington's world ranking up to sixth.

Place Player Country Score To par Money (£)
1 Pádraig Harrington   Ireland 3-3-4-5=15 E 750,000
2 Sergio García   Spain 5-3-4-4=16 +1 450,000
ScorecardEdit
Hole 1 16 17 18
Par 4 3 4 4
  Harrington −1 −1 −1 E
  Garcia +1 +1 +1 +1

Cumulative playoff scores, relative to par

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "Media guide". The Open Championship. 2011. pp. 22, 203. Archived from the original on 18 April 2012. Retrieved 1 July 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d Ferguson, Doug (23 July 2007). "A Car-nasty finish". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon, U.S.). Associated Press. p. D1.
  3. ^ "Open prize fund increased to £4.2 million". 3 July 2007. Retrieved 16 July 2007.
  4. ^ British Open field: Who's in, and how they got there – Golf – ESPN
  5. ^ a b Ferguson, Doug (20 July 2007). "Garcia covers tracks of his tears with first-round 65". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon, U.S.). Associated Press. p. D1.
  6. ^ Ferguson, Doug (17 July 1999). "Frenchman survives freak Friday". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon, U.S.). Associated Press. p. D1.
  7. ^ a b Ferguson, Doug (21 July 2007). "Garcia remains on top". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon, U.S.). Associated Press. p. D1.
  8. ^ a b Ferguson, Doug (22 July 2007). "Looking out for No. 1". Sunday Register-Guard. (Eugene, Oregon, U.S.). Associated Press. p. D1.
  9. ^ Open debut has McIlroy dreaming of the Claret Jug, PGA 2007.
  10. ^ "2007 Open Championship results". databasegolf.com. Retrieved 1 July 2012.

External linksEdit