Open main menu

2006–07 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season

The 2006–07 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was a slightly above average event in tropical cyclone formation which started on November 15, 2006 and ended on April 30, 2007 for most areas and on May 15, 2007 for Mauritius and the Seychelles. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion.

2006–07 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season
2006-2007 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season summary.jpg
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedOctober 19, 2006
Last system dissipatedApril 12, 2007
Strongest storm
NameDora and Favio
 • Maximum winds195 km/h (120 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure925 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Total disturbances15
Total depressions11
Total storms10
Tropical cyclones7
Intense tropical cyclones6
Total fatalities188 (126 missing)
Total damage$337 million (2007 USD)
Related articles
South-West Indian Ocean tropical cyclone seasons
2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09

Contents

Pre-season outlookEdit

On October 13, 2006, the Mauritius Meteorological Services issued their seasonal outlook for the Southwest Indian Ocean. They forecast an El Niño-positive phase for the season, meaning that normal to slightly above normal activity was likely.[1] They also forecast a weak Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, which favoured formation of tropical storms, and noted that as 2006 Northern Hemisphere activity was slightly below normal, it might result in slightly above normal activity in the Southwest Indian Ocean.[1] Based on regional indicators, they noted that named tropical storms would not last for short durations. Most other regional factors indicated the likelihood of a normal season.[1] Therefore, the forecast called for about 10 named storms, mostly west of Diego Garcia, with at least one forming in the Mozambique Channel.[1]

Seasonal summaryEdit

Cyclone IndlalaCyclone GamedeCyclone FavioCyclone BondoTropical cyclone scales#Comparisons across basins 

SystemsEdit

Moderate Tropical Storm AnitaEdit

Moderate tropical storm (MFR)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationNovember 26 – December 4
Peak intensity65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  996 hPa (mbar)

During the second half of November, convection pulsed to the north of Madagascar. The MFR classified a low pressure area as Tropical Disturbance 2 on November 26. Located within an area of moderate wind shear, the system consolidated while moving southwestward. The JTWC classified the system as Tropical Cyclone 03S on November 29. That day, the disturbance turned to the south, paralleling the east coast of Mozambique while moving around a ridge. On November 30, the MFR upgraded the system to Moderate Tropical Storm Anita, estimating peak 10 minute winds of 65 km/h (40 mph). On the same day, the JTWC estimated peak 1 minute winds of 85 km/h (50 mph). Anita soon encountered higher wind shear, causing the convection to diminish over the center, and for Anita to weaken back to a tropical depression. The MFR stopped tracking Anita on December 3.[2][3]

While moving close to Mozambique, Anita dropped heavy rainfall in southeast Tanzania, reaching 152 mm (6.0 in) over 24 hours.[4] Heavy rainfall also occurred in the Comoros, eastern Mozambique, and northwest Madagascar, causing flash flooding.[5][6][7]

Intense Tropical Cyclone BondoEdit

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
DurationDecember 15 – December 28
Peak intensity205 km/h (125 mph) (10-min)  930 hPa (mbar)

A tropical disturbance developed on December 15 in the central Indian Ocean west of Diego Garcia. It strengthened into Moderate Tropical Storm Bondo on December 18. Thereafter, the storm rapidly intensified while moving westward, taking advantage of favorable atmospheric conditions. Within 18 hours of being named, Bondo intensified into to tropical cyclone status, or the equivalent of a minimal hurricane. The MFR estimated peak 10 minute sustained winds of 205 km/h (125 mph), although the JTWC estimated stronger 1 minute winds of 250 km/h (155 mph). While near peak intensity, Bondo passed just south of Agaléga island, before weakening slightly and moving through the Farquhar Group of islands belonging to the Seychelles, becoming the strongest cyclone to affect that island group in decades. Bondo turned southwestward, and after brushing the northern coast of Madagascar, the cyclone made landfall near Mahajanga on December 25. The storm continued southward, and was last tracked by the MFR on December 28.[7][8][9][10]

Due to its small size, Bondo's winds did not exceed 100 km/h (62 mph) on Agaléga, despite passing close by near peak intensity.[7] In the Seychelles, Bondo severely damaged buildings and vegetation on Providence Atoll.[11] High waves caused flooding elsewhere in the archipelago.[10] In Madagascar, Bondo killed 11 people when it struck the island's west coast. The storm's high winds, reaching 155 km/h (96 mph) in Mahajanga, damaged buildings and left around 20,000 people homeless.[4]

Severe Tropical Storm ClovisEdit

Severe tropical storm (MFR)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
DurationDecember 25 – January 4
Peak intensity115 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  978 hPa (mbar)

Toward the end of December, the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) was active across the southern Indian Ocean. An area of thunderstorms persisted west of Diego Garcia on December 24, which wrapped around a developing circulation. On the next day, the MFR designated the system as Tropical Disturbance 4. The system drifted to the southwest, encountering an area of high wind shear on December 27, causing the circulation to become exposed and weaken. A new, larger circulation developed within the system, prompting the MFR to issue new warnings on Tropical Disturbance 5 on December 29, located southeast of Agaléga. The MFR upgraded the system to Moderate Tropical Storm Clovis on December 31 while the storm was near Tromelin Island. Clovis continued to the south-southwest, steered by a ridge to its southeast. On January 2, the MFR estimated peak 10 minute winds of 115 km/h (70 mph). The JTWC estimated slightly higher 1 minute winds of 120 km/h (75 mph), the equivalent of a minimal hurricane. Satellite imagery at this time showed a small eye in the center of the convection. While near peak intensity, Clovis made landfall in eastern Madagascar near Nosy Varika on January 3. The storm rapidly weakened over land while executing a small loop, dissipating on January 4.[7][9][12]

High waves affected the north coast of Mauritius. Clovis killed four people in Madagascar, and left 13,465 people homeless. In the country, the storm Clovis dropped heavy rainfall, reaching 213.9 mm (8.42 in) in Mananjary. The rains caused flooding, which damaged houses, power grids, and crops.[7][4] At least 1,500 ha (3,700 acres) of rice farms in Mananjary were damaged, representing about 30% of the harvest. Other damaged crops include cassava, banana, vanilla, and fruit trees.[13] The floods left roads impassable in Nosy Varika, which limited communications along with power and phone outages.[14]

Intense Tropical Cyclone DoraEdit

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
DurationJanuary 26 – February 8
Peak intensity195 km/h (120 mph) (10-min)  925 hPa (mbar)

On January 26, an area of convection persisted west of Diego Garcia. That day, the MFR designated it as a tropical disturbance. Located in an area of low wind shear, the system slowly organized while moving southwestward, developing more convection and outflow over time. On January 28, the JTWC designated the system as Tropical Cyclone 10S. On the next day, the MFR upgraded the system to Moderate Tropical Storm Dora. The storm quickly intensified, and the JTWC upgraded Dora to the equivalent of a minimal hurricane on January 30. On February 1, the MFR upgraded Dora to tropical cyclone status. By that time, the cyclone was moving slowly south-southeastward between two ridges. Dora turned back to the southwest on February 2, and briefly weakened before re-intensifying, possibly the result of an eyewall replacement cycle. On February 3, the MFR upgraded Dora to an intense tropical cyclone, estimating peak 10 minute winds of 195 km/h (120 mph). The JTWC meanwhile estimated peak 1 minute winds of 215 km/h (135 mph). While at its peak intensity, Dora resembled an annular cyclone, with a large eye and a symmetrical cloud pattern. Cyclone Dora maintained peak intensity for about 12 hours before weakening due to cooler, drier air from the southeast. On February 5, Dora weakened below tropical cyclone status, as its forward movement also slowed. On February 6, Dora passed about 165 km (105 mi) east of Rodrigues. The thunderstorms around the thunderstorms dwindled due to higher wind shear, until the circulation was entirely exposed on February 9. On that day, the MFR reclassified Dora as an extratropical cyclone. The agency tracked the storm for four more days as the storm curved to the south.[7][15][16]

The Mauritius Meteorological Service first issued cyclone warnings for Rodrigues on January 31, and continued issuing warnings for the island until February 7 when the storm passed the area. Dora dropped 92 mm (3.6 in) of rainfall on the island, and gusts reached 83 km/h (52 mph).[7]

Severe Tropical Storm EnokEdit

Severe tropical storm (MFR)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationFebruary 6 – February 13
Peak intensity115 km/h (70 mph) (10-min)  978 hPa (mbar)

A tropical disturbance formed off the east coast of Madagascar on February 6. That day, the JTWC issued a tropical cyclone formation alert, indicating rapid development of the small weather system. The nascent system moved northeastward, an unusual track caused by a trough extending northwestward from the remnants of Cyclone Dora, as well as ridge to the north. With good outflow and low wind shear, the small system intensified quickly on February 9. That day, the MFR upgraded the system to Severe Tropical Storm Enok, and the JTWC classified the storm as Tropical Cyclone 13S. Early on February 10, the MFR estimated peak winds of 115 km/h (70 mph), although it is possible the storm was stronger, based on the appearance of an eye-like feature in the convection. That day, Enok passed just north of St. Brandon, which reported a calm lasting a few minutes. The storm moved quickly to the southeast and weakened due to higher wind shear and dry air. Late on February 10, Enok passed just northeast of Rodrigues. On the next day, the storm weakened to into a tropical depression and turned back to the west. The MFR discontinued advisories on February 13.[7][17][18][19]

On St. Brandon, Enok produced wind gusts of 160 km/h (99 mph), strong enough to damage iron sheets and a window pane. Rainfall on the island reached 118 mm (4.6 in). Later, Enok produced wind gusts of 142 km/h (88 mph) on Rodrigues; the storm dropped 147 mm (5.8 in) of rainfall.[7]

Intense Tropical Cyclone FavioEdit

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
DurationFebruary 11 – February 23
Peak intensity195 km/h (120 mph) (10-min)  925 hPa (mbar)

Cyclone Favio developed as a tropical disturbance on February 11 to the southwest of Diego Garcia. It moved southwestward due to a ridge to its southeast, gradually organizing amid favorable conditions. The JTWC first classified the system as Tropical Cyclone 14S on February 14. A day later, the MFR upgraded the system to Moderate Tropical Storm Favio, and later that day, the storm passed about 120 km (75 mi) northwest of Rodrigues. The ridge to its south built westward, causing Favio to turn westward. On February 19, the MFR upgraded the storm to tropical cyclone status while Favio was passing south of Madagascar. The cyclone intensified further as it turned to the northwest in the Mozambique Channel. Late on February 20, the MFR estimated that Favio attained peak winds of 195 km/h (120 mph), making it an intense tropical cyclone. Meanwhile, the JTWC estimated peak 1 minute winds of 220 km/h (140 mph). Favio weakened slightly before making landfall in southeastern Mozambique on February 22 near Vilankulo. This made Favio the first cyclone on record to strike Mozambique after moving south of Madagascar. The cyclone rapidly weakened over land, and the MFR discontinued advisories on February 23 when the storm was near the Mozambique/Zimbabwe border.[15][17][4][20]

On Rodrigues, the cyclone produced 114 km/h (71 mph) wind gusts, as well as heavy rainfall reaching 217.6 mm (8.57 in).[7] The storm brushed the southern coast of Madagascar, producing heavy rainfall that blocked roads.[21] In Mozambique, Favio killed 10 people and injured nearly 100 others.[22][23] The storm damaged about 130,000 homes, which displaced over 33,000 people, and also damaged 130 schools, widespread areas of crops, and power grids.[24][25][26] Favio dropped heavy rainfall across southern Africa, causing flooding in eastern Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe.[4][27][28]

Intense Tropical Cyclone GamedeEdit

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
DurationFebruary 19 – March 2
Peak intensity165 km/h (105 mph) (10-min)  935 hPa (mbar)

A tropical disturbance developed within the ITCZ on February 19 southeast of Diego Garcia. Steered by a ridge to the south, the system moved westward and gradually organized amid favorable conditions. On February 21, the MFR upgraded the system to Moderate Tropical Storm Gamede, and the JTWC initiated advisories on Tropical Cyclone 15S. Gamede gradually intensified, reaching tropical cyclone intensity on February 23. The track shifted to the west-southwest, and the outer rainbands began affecting the Mascarene Islands on February 24. A day later, the storm stalled to the north of Réunion, trapped between ridges to the east-northeast and to the south. During this time, Gamede attained peak 10 minute winds of 165 km/h (105 mph), according to the MFR. The JTWC estimated peak 1 minute winds of 195 km/h (120 mph). The cyclone passed west of Réunion on February 27, after beginning a steady motion to the south-southwest. By that time, Gamede had weakened due to upwelling cooler waters, and later weakened further due to stronger wind shear. On March 2, the MFR reclassified Gamede as an extratropical cyclone, and the agency tracked the storm for four more days as the circulation again stalled before drifting westward.[18][17][7][29]

Cyclone Gamede passed near St. Brandon, where its 160 km/h (99 mph) wind gusts damaged a few windows. The prolonged track of Gamede near and around the Mascarene Islands produced high tides and beach erosion along the north coast of Mauritius.[7] Gamede broke numerous world records for tropical cyclone rainfall, with world records set for accumulated rainfall over 72 hours to accumulated rainfall over 9 days.[30] Between February 24 and 27, 154.6 inches (3929 mm) of rain fell on Réunion island.[31] A bridge that collapsed due to Gamede caused about 20 million in damage.[32]

Tropical Cyclone HumbaEdit

Tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
DurationFebruary 20 – February 26
Peak intensity140 km/h (85 mph) (10-min)  960 hPa (mbar)

A tropical low southwest of Sumatra was first referenced in a BOM three-day cyclone outlook on February 19. Two days later, while slowly developing, it crossed 90°E and was designated Tropical Disturbance 11R by M-F. The JTWC issued a TCFA on February 21, and upgraded it to Tropical Cyclone 16S several hours later as convection continued to flare. It was upgraded by M-F to a tropical depression the next day. Little strengthening occurred over the next two days, although convection continued to be impressive. It was upgraded to a moderate tropical storm on February 23, and was named Humba. Gradual strengthening continued, and Humba was upgraded first to a severe tropical storm later that day then to a tropical cyclone on February 25. It managed to strengthen to 80 kt, 960 hPa, before it started weakening again, and was downgraded back to a severe tropical storm on February 26. The same day, with Humba undergoing extratropical transition, the JTWC issued its final warning on the system. Météo-France followed suit the next day.

Intense Tropical Cyclone IndlalaEdit

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
DurationMarch 9 – March 19
Peak intensity175 km/h (110 mph) (10-min)  935 hPa (mbar)

On March 10, Météo-France noted an area of convection around 60°E, and numbered it 12R. The next day, M-F upgraded it to a tropical disturbance as the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert on it. The disturbance continued to strengthen, and later that day M-F upgraded 12R to a tropical depression. Under favorable conditions, it strengthened into a moderate tropical storm early on March 12. Originally, the storm was referred to as "Indlada" by M-F, but this was later corrected to the correct name, Indlala. Indlala continued to strengthen, and it was upgraded to a severe tropical storm. It reached tropical cyclone intensity on March 13 in favourable conditions, with infrared satellite imagery showing an intermittent eye. It continued to strengthen in a favourable environment, with a well-defined eye, and reached intense tropical cyclone strength the next day as it tracked westward towards Madagascar. It made landfall early on March 15 as it was undergoing an eyewall replacement cycle, near Antalaha, Madagascar, and weakened quickly while over land. It dissipated over land on March 17, and the final warning was issued.

Indlala killed 150 people and left another 126 missing. A total of 188,331 people were also left homeless due to the storm.[7] Damages from Indlala amounted to $240 million.

Tropical Disturbance 13Edit

Tropical disturbance (MFR)
  
DurationMarch 13 – March 17
Peak intensity45 km/h (30 mph) (10-min)  1000 hPa (mbar)

Tropical cyclone bulletins were initiated by Météo-France on March 13 on an area of disturbed weather that had lingered in the south central Indian Ocean for three days as satellite imagery showed an improving low-level circulation. Only irregular bulletins were issued over the course of the system's existence. It gained enough organisation to be considered a tropical disturbance on March 15, but never strengthened further. The final warning was issued on March 17 as it started to dissipate.

Intense Tropical Cyclone JayaEdit

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHWS)
DurationMarch 26 – April 8
Peak intensity185 km/h (115 mph) (10-min)  935 hPa (mbar)

An area of sheared convection was first spotted on March 25 in the south central Indian Ocean. Four days later, Météo-France initiated warnings on the zone of disturbed weather, which had a partially exposed low-level centre. At first, only irregular bulletins were issued, but as it organised rapidly it was upgraded to a tropical depression on March 30. Mauritius designated the system a moderate tropical storm at the same time, and named it Jaya. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued a TCFA, before designating it Tropical Cyclone 22S later that same day. As it continued to organise, M-F upgraded it to a moderate tropical storm. It continued to strengthen, and Jaya was upgraded to a tropical cyclone early on March 31 by M-F. Rapid intensification continued, and Jaya quickly reached intense tropical cyclone status by the afternoon of the 31st, reaching a peak of 100 kt 930 hPa.

However, its small size meant that its structure and intensity easily fluctuated, and on April 1 it weakened slightly, with infrared imagery showing disorganisation as it encountered increased vertical wind shear, Jaya was downgraded to a tropical cyclone. As Jaya neared northeast Madagascar late on April 2, it was re-upgraded to an intense tropical cyclone after convection improved. However, Jaya lost strength just hours later as it was about to make landfall due to dry air and wind shear, and became disorganised.[33]

Jaya made landfall at around 0800 UTC April 3 near Sambava, Madagascar at tropical cyclone intensity, with wind gusts near 180–200 km/h.[34] It re-emerged over water in the Mozambique Channel as a highly disorganised weak system lacking convection, and the final warning was issued.

On April 5, deep convection consolidated around the centre of Jaya's remnant circulation as the system reorganised, causing the JTWC to issue a new TCFA. Météo-France issued an advisory at 1200 UTC that afternoon on Tropical Disturbance 14R, but noted that vertical wind shear limited potential for significant intensification. Due to its proximity to the Mozambique coast, the system was affected by its terrain, but tracked just off the coast without making landfall. Over the next two days, Jaya came under heavy wind shear, and weakened considerably. However, it made another comeback on April 7, undergoing short-term rapid intensification, prompting Météo-France to issue a new advisory. However, convection became very weak and Jaya's circulation became fully exposed, and Météo-France again stopped advisories.

Reuters reports at least three people dead and many homes destroyed.[35]

Subtropical Depression 15Edit

Subtropical depression (MFR)
DurationApril 9 – April 12
Peak intensity95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  994 hPa (mbar)

On April 11, Météo-France started warnings on a subtropical system to the south of Madagascar. It was water with a sea surface temperature of 25 °C, and had weak convection associated with it. The warning noted that due to a decrease in wind shear, the system had organised enough to be considered a subtropical depression. However, in the warning it was also noted that extratropical transition would soon occur. It became fully extratropical the next day after wind shear increased. In operational reanalysis, it was found that the system had formed on April 9, and had become a tropical depression late on April 10 before becoming subtropical and reaching gale strength.[36]

Other stormsEdit

The first tropical system in the season originated from an area of convection that developed northwest of Diego Garcia on October 18. The system had defined outflow and a tight circulation, spurring the JTWC to issue a TCFA. On October 19, the MFR classified it as Tropical Disturbance 1. Environmental conditions were only marginally favorable, and the disturbance drifted to the southwest without much organization. After passing southeast of the Seychelles, the disturbance passed north of Madagascar. The MFR last issued advisories on the system on October 23.[37]

In early January, an area of convection formed in the Mozambique Channel. The MFR classified it as Tropical Disturbance 6 on January 8, but the system failed to intensify further. The MFR discontinued advisories that day, as the disturbance would soon move over southwestern Madagascar.[15]

Storm namesEdit

A tropical disturbance is named when it reaches moderate tropical storm strength. If a tropical disturbance reaches moderate tropical storm status west of 55°E, then the Sub-regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Centre in Madagascar assigns the appropriate name to the storm. If a tropical disturbance reaches moderate tropical storm status between 55°E and 90°E, then the Sub-regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Centre in Mauritius assigns the appropriate name to the storm. A new annual list is used every year so no names are retired.[38] These were the names used this year.[39]

  • Jaya
  • Katse (unused)
  • Lisebo (unused)
  • Magoma (unused)
  • Newa (unused)
  • Olipa (unused)
  • Panda (unused)
  • Quince (unused)
  • Rabeca (unused)
  • Shyra (unused)
  • Tsholo (unused)
  • Unokubi (unused)
  • Vuyane (unused)
  • Warura (unused)
  • Xylo (unused)
  • Yone (unused)
  • Zouleha (unused)

Season effectsEdit

This table lists all the storms that developed in the Southern Hemisphere during the 2006-2007 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season. It includes their intensity, duration, name, landfalls, deaths, and damages. All data is taken from Météo-France. Number in parenthesis are people missing.

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
Pressure Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
01 October 19 – 23 Tropical Disturbance 45 km/h (30 mph) 1002 hPa (29.59 inHg) None None None
Anita November 26 – December 4 Moderate Tropical Storm 65 km/h (40 mph) 996 hPa (29.42 inHg) Madagascar, Mozambique
Bondo December 15 – 28 Intense Tropical Cyclone 205 km/h (125 mph) 930 hPa (27.47 inHg) Madagascar, Mozambique 11
04 December 22 – 28 Tropical Disturbance 45 km/h (30 mph) 1000 hPa (29.53 inHg) None None None
Clovis December 29 – January 4 Severe tropical storm 115 km/h (70 mph) 978 hPa (28.88 inHg) Madagascar 6
06 January 5 – 8 Tropical Disturbance 45 km/h (30 mph) 999 hPa (29.50 inHg) None None None
Dora January 26 – February 8 Intense Tropical Cyclone 195 km/h (120 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Rodrigues None None
Enok February 6 – 13 Severe tropical storm 115 km/h (70 mph) 978 hPa (28.88 inHg) None None None
Favio February 11 – 23 Intense Tropical Cyclone 195 km/h (120 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) Mozambique, Madagascar $71 million 14
Gamede February 19 – March 1 Intense Tropical Cyclone 165 km/h (105 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) Mascarene Islands (Direct hit, no landfall) $26 million 4
Humba February 20 – 26 Tropical Cyclone 140 km/h (85 mph) 960 hPa (28.35 inHg) None None None
Indlala March 9 – 19 Intense Tropical Cyclone 175 km/h (110 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) Madagascar $240 million 150
13 March 13 – 17 Tropical Disturbance 45 km/h (30 mph) 1000 hPa (29.53 inHg) None None None
Jaya March 26 – April 8 Intense Tropical Cyclone 185 km/h (115 mph) 935 hPa (27.61 inHg) Madagascar 3
15 April 9 – 12 Subtropical Depression 95 km/h (60 mph) 994 hPa (29.35 inHg) None None None
Season aggregates
15 systems October 19 – April 12 195 km/h (120 mph) 925 hPa (27.32 inHg) $337 million 188

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d WebCite query result
  2. ^ Gary Padgett (March 3, 2007). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary November 2006". Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  3. ^ Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 2007 Anita (2006330S06049). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e RA I Tropical Cyclone Committee for the South-West Indian Ocean Eighteenth Session (PDF) (Report). World Meteorological Organization. 2008. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  5. ^ Weather Hazards Impacts Assessment for Africa: December 7 - 13, 2006 (Report). Famine Early Warning System Network. December 6, 2006. ReliefWeb. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  6. ^ "Southern African Humanitarian Crisis Update - December 2006". UN Regional Inter-Agency Coordination and Support Office. December 31, 2006. ReliefWeb. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Technical Report CS 28 Cyclone Season of the South West Indian Ocean 2006 – 2007 (PDF) (Report). Mauritius Meteorological Services.
  8. ^ Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 2007 Bondo (2006350S07071). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  9. ^ a b Gary Padgett (March 4, 2007). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary December 2006". Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  10. ^ a b Denis hang Seng; Richard Guillande (July 2008). Disaster risk profile of the Republic of Seychelles (PDF) (Report). PreventionWeb. p. 45, 46. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  11. ^ Adrian Skerrett (January 8, 2007). "Island Conservation-A serious blow". Seychelles Nation. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  12. ^ Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 2007 Clovis (2006364S12058). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  13. ^ Madagascar: Cyclone Clovis DREF operation no. MDRMG001 final report. International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies (Report). December 17, 2007. ReliefWeb. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  14. ^ Madagascar: Cyclone Clovis DREF Bulletin no. MDRMG001. International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies (Report). January 19, 2007. ReliefWeb. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  15. ^ a b c Gary Padgett. "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary January 2007". Retrieved December 13, 2018.
  16. ^ Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 2007 Dora (2007027S07069). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  17. ^ a b c 2007 Annual Tropical Cyclone Report (PDF) (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  18. ^ a b Gary Padgett (March 28, 2007). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary February 2007". Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  19. ^ Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 2007 Enok (2007037S19050). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  20. ^ Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 2007 Favio (2007043S11071). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  21. ^ "Cyclone Favio rampages through coastal town". IRN Africa. February 22, 2007. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  22. ^ SAPA (March 11, 2007). "Cyclone may hit tourist resorts". News24.
  23. ^ "Children hardest hit by Cyclone Favio". United Nations Children’s Fund. February 22, 2007. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  24. ^ "Coastal towns hard at work after Cyclone Favio". UNICEF. February 28, 2007. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  25. ^ "Mozambique: Floods and Cyclone Fact Sheet #1 (FY) 2007". Relief Web. March 22, 2007. Retrieved April 13, 2013.
  26. ^ "MOZAMBIQUE: Cyclone Favio rampages through coastal town". IRIN Africa. February 22, 2007. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  27. ^ "Tropical Cyclone Favio takes its wrath out on Mozambique". The Zambienen. March 8, 2007. Archived from the original on May 5, 2013. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  28. ^ "Cyclone Favio Strikes Mozambique". Earthweek. March 2, 2007. Retrieved April 15, 2013.
  29. ^ Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 2007 Gamede (2007050S16079). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  30. ^ WebCite query result
  31. ^ Faq : Hurricanes, Typhoons, And Tropical Cyclones Archived April 4, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  32. ^ "Cyclone nears coastline of Reunion Island; 1 woman reported missing". International Herald Tribune. Associated Press. February 27, 2007. Archived from the original on April 1, 2007. Retrieved April 22, 2007.
  33. ^ WebCite query result
  34. ^ WebCite query result
  35. ^ "Several plantations were also ruined". April 10, 2007. Archived from the original on January 18, 2008.
  36. ^ WebCite query result
  37. ^ Gary Padgett (February 6, 2007). "Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary October 2006". Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  38. ^ "Tropical Cyclone Operational Plan for the South Pacific and South-East Indian Ocean" (PDF). World Meteorological Organization. 2003. Retrieved August 15, 2008.[dead link]
  39. ^ La Réunion - Météo-France (2007). "Liste des noms des tempêtes et cyclones tropicaux pour la saison 2006-2007 sur le Sud-Ouest de l´Océan Indien" (in French). Archived from the original on March 2, 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-31.

External linksEdit