2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi

The 2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi were held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004 and elected the four U.S. Representatives from the state of Mississippi. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including a quadrennial presidential election.

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi
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← 2002 November 2, 2004 (2004-11-02) 2006 →

All 4 Mississippi seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party Third party
 
Party Republican Democratic Reform
Last election 2 2 0
Seats won 2 2 0
Seat change Steady Steady Steady
Popular vote 658,589 336,240 80,948
Percentage 59.00% 30.12% 7.25%

OverviewEdit

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 658,589 59.00% 2  
Democratic 336,240 30.12% 2  
Reform 80,948 7.25% 0  
Independents 40,426 3.62% 0  
Totals 1,116,203 100.00% 4  

District 1Edit

Republican Roger Wicker, who had represented Mississippi's 1st congressional district since 1994, easily ran for re-election with his only opposition being one third party candidate as the Democrats did not field a candidate.

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

2004 Mississippi's 1st congressional district[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roger Wicker (incumbent) 219,328 79.01%
Reform Barbara Dale Washer 58,256 20.99%
Total votes 277,584 100.0
Republican hold

District 2Edit

Democrat Bennie Thompson, who had represented Mississippi's 2nd congressional district since 1993, was running for re-election. Thompson faced no opposition in the primary, but would face Clinton LeSueur in the general.

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bennie Thompson (incumbent) 24,316 100.00%
Total votes 24,316 100.00

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Clinton LeSueur 14,468 84.83%
Republican Stephanie Summers-O'Neal 1,319 7.73%
Republican James Broadwater 1,266 7.42%
Republican Write-in 3 0.02%
Total votes 17,056 100.00

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

2004 Mississippi's 2nd congressional district[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bennie Thompson (incumbent) 154,626 58.38%
Republican Clinton LeSueur 107,647 40.64%
Reform Shawn O'Hara 2,596 0.98%
Total votes 264,869 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3Edit

Republican Chip Pickering, who had represented Mississippi's 1st congressional district since 1996, easily ran for re-election with his only opposition being two third party candidates as the Democrats did not field a candidate.

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

2004 Mississippi's 3rd congressional district[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chip Pickering (incumbent) 234,874 79.01%
Independent Jim Giles 40,426 13.78%
Reform Lamonica L. McGee 18,068 6.16%
Total votes 293,368 100.0
Republican hold

District 4Edit

Democrat Gene Taylor, who had represented Mississippi's 3rd congressional district since 1989, was running for re-election. Thompson faced no opposition in the primary, but would face State Representative Michael Lott in the general.

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Taylor (incumbent) 938 100.00%
Total votes 938 100.00

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Clinton LeSueur 14,468 84.83%
Republican Stephanie Summers-O'Neal 1,319 7.73%
Republican James Broadwater 1,266 7.42%
Republican Write-in 3 0.02%
Total votes 17,056 100.00

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

2004 Mississippi's 4th congressional district[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Taylor (incumbent) 181,614 64.77%
Republican Michael Lott 96,740 34.50%
Reform Tracella Lou O'Hara Hill 2,028 0.72%
Total votes 280,382 100.0
Democratic hold

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Federal Elections 2004" (PDF). 1 May 2005.