2004 UEFA Super Cup

The 2004 UEFA Super Cup was an association football match between Porto of Portugal and Valencia of Spain on 27 August 2004, held at the Stade Louis II in Monaco. The match was the 29th annual UEFA Super Cup contested between the winners of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup. Porto were appearing in the Super Cup for the third time; they won the competition in 1987 and lost in 2003. Valencia were appearing in the competition for the second time; their previous appearance in 1980 resulted in a victory.

2004 UEFA Super Cup
2004 UEFA Super Cup programme.jpg
Match programme cover
EventUEFA Super Cup
Date27 August 2004
VenueStade Louis II, Monaco
Man of the MatchRubén Baraja
(Valencia)[1]
RefereeTerje Hauge
(Norway)[2]
Attendance17,292[3]
2003
2005

The teams had qualified for the Super Cup match by winning the two seasonal European competitions. Porto had qualified by winning the 2003–04 UEFA Champions League, they defeated French team AS Monaco 3–0 in the final. Valencia won the 2003–04 UEFA Cup, beating French team, Marseille 2–0.

Watched by a crowd of 17,292, Valencia took the lead in the first half when Rubén Baraja scored. They extended their lead in the second half when Marco Di Vaio scored in the 67th minute to give them a 2–0 lead. Porto scored in the 78th minute courtesy of Ricardo Quaresma, but they were unable to score the second goal they needed to level the game. As a result, Valencia won the match 2–1 to win their second Super Cup.

MatchEdit

BackgroundEdit

 
The Stade Louis II, which has been the venue for the UEFA Super Cup from 1998 to 2012

Porto qualified for the Super Cup as the reigning UEFA Champions League winners. They had won the 2003–04 UEFA Champions League beating AS Monaco 3–0 to win the competition for the second time.[4] It would be Porto's third appearance in the competition was contesting the Super Cup for the third time. They won the competition in 1987 beating Ajax, while they lost in 2003, to Milan.[5]

Valencia had qualified for the competition as a result of winning the 2003–04 UEFA Cup. They had beaten Marseille 2–0 in the final.[6] Valencia's only previous appearance in 1980 resulted in victory, beating Nottingham Forest.[7] Porto and Valencia had previously met each other in two European competition matches. In the second round of the 1989–90 UEFA Cup, Porto eliminated the Spanish team with a 5–4 aggregate score, as result of a 3–1 home win and a 2–3 away loss.[8]

Soon after their European victories, Porto manager José Mourinho and Valencia manager Rafael Benítez parted with their clubs—Mourinho was hired by Chelsea, while Benitez took Liverpool's helm[9]—and were therefore not able to lead their teams into the 2004 UEFA Super Cup. To replace them, Porto had hired Victor Fernández, and Valencia brought back Claudio Ranieri for a second spell.[9] Besides the manager position, both clubs also went through significant squad changes. Porto sold Brazilian-Portuguese playmaker Deco to Barcelona, and Portuguese defenders Ricardo Carvalho and Paulo Ferreira accompanied Mourinho to Chelsea.[10] Relevant signings included Portuguese internationals Ricardo Quaresma, Hélder Postiga and Raul Meireles; Greek international and newly crowned UEFA Euro 2004 champion Giourkas Seitaridis, and Brazilian international and 2004 Copa América winner Diego.[10] Ranieri brought to Valencia three Italian internationals: former Juventus striker Marco Di Vaio, and Lazio players Bernardo Corradi and Stefano Fiore.[11]

Coming into the match after their previous week loss at the Supercopa de España, Valencia captain David Albelda admitted the team was "not at 100 per cent" and was still "hurt by the defeat", but this setback should help them "go into the match fully concentrated and go all out to win".[12] On the other hand, Porto were coming from another Supertaça Cândido de Oliveira victory. The team's midfielder and captain Costinha assured that Valencia would be "an even tougher match" as it is "a very experienced team with good players". Remembering the Super Cup defeat against Milan in the previous year, Costinha showed no doubts: "... this time things are going to be different. I'm confident we can win".[13] Nonetheless, Porto had two key players ruled out due to injuries. Brazilian striker Derlei suffered a right knee ligament lesion during a friendly match on 15 August with city rivals Boavista,[14] whereas Diego suffered a thigh injury during the Portuguese Super Cup match.[15]

DetailsEdit

Porto  1–2  Valencia
Quaresma   78' Report Baraja   32'
Di Vaio   67'
Attendance: 17,292[3]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Porto
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Valencia
GK 99   Vítor Baía
RB 22   Giourkas Seitaridis
CB 2   Jorge Costa (c)   52'
CB 7   Pepe
LB 8   Nuno Valente
CM 18   Maniche
CM 6   Costinha
CM 4   Hugo Leal   61'
RW 77   Benni McCarthy   42'   72'
CF 41   Hélder Postiga
LW 19   Carlos Alberto
Substitutes:
GK 13   Nuno
DF 3   Pedro Emanuel
DF 5   Ricardo Costa
MF 10   Ricardo Quaresma   72'   61'
MF 12   César Peixoto   72'
MF 33   Raul Meireles
FW 29   Hugo Almeida
Manager:
  Víctor Fernández
GK 1   Santiago Cañizares
RB 23   Curro Torres
CB 17   David Navarro   16'
CB 5   Carlos Marchena
LB 15   Amedeo Carboni   90+2'
RM 19   Francisco Rufete
CM 8   Rubén Baraja
CM 6   David Albelda (c)   40'
LM 14   Vicente
CF 9   Bernardo Corradi   87'
CF 11   Marco Di Vaio   77'
Substitutes:
GK 13   Andrés Palop
DF 12   Marco Caneira
MF 7   Stefano Fiore
MF 16   Mohamed Sissoko
MF 21   Pablo Aimar   87'
FW 18   Xisco
FW 20   Mista   77'
Manager:
  Claudio Ranieri

Man of the Match:
  Rubén Baraja (Valencia)[1]

Assistant referees:
  Steinar Holvik (Norway)[2]
  Ole Hermann Borgan (Norway)[2]
Fourth official:
  Tom Henning Øvrebø (Norway)[2]


Match rules

  • 90 minutes
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary
  • Penalty shootout if scores still level
  • Seven named substitutes
  • Maximum of three substitutions

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Ranieri finds winning blend". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 28 August 2004. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Super Cup date for Hauge". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 25 August 2004. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  3. ^ a b "Match Press Kit (2009)" (PDF). Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 1 June 2012. See page 18
  4. ^ "Porto perform to perfection". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 27 May 2004. Retrieved 30 April 2011.
  5. ^ "2003: Shevchenko steals the show". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 30 April 2011.
  6. ^ Harte, Adrian (20 May 2004). "Valencia victorious in Gothenburg". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 30 April 2011.
  7. ^ "1980: Valencia profit from Felman's fortune". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 30 April 2011.
  8. ^ Ross, James M. (17 January 2008). "UEFA Cup 1989-90". RSSSF.com. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 14 May 2011. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  9. ^ a b "Iberians eye Super Cup silverware". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 18 August 2004. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  10. ^ a b "Summer of surprises for Porto". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 18 August 2004. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  11. ^ "Ranieri back for unfinished business". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 18 August 2004. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  12. ^ Harte, Simon (26 August 2004). "Captain Albelda's call to arms". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 7 May 2011.
  13. ^ Tavares, Nuno (26 August 2004). "Costinha shows desire". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 8 May 2011.
  14. ^ "Derlei doubtful for Porto". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 17 August 2004. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  15. ^ "Diego to miss Monaco showpiece". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 23 August 2004. Retrieved 1 May 2011.