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1st Missouri Regiment of Colored Infantry

The First Missouri Regiment of Colored Infantry was an African-American infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was redesignated as the 62nd Regiment of U.S. Colored Troops on March 11, 1864.

1st Missouri Regiment of Colored Infantry - 62nd U.S. Colored Troops
Flag of the United States (1863-1865).svg
ActiveDecember 14, 1863, to March 31, 1866
CountryUnited States
AllegianceUnited States of America
Union
BranchInfantry
EngagementsBattle of Palmito Ranch
Battle of White's Ranch

Contents

ServiceEdit

The Regiment was organized at Benton Barracks, in St. Louis, Missouri, December 7–14, 1863. Attached to District of St. Louis, Mo., to January 1864. Designation changed to 62nd Regiment United States Colored Troops March 11, 1864. Ordered to Port Hudson, Louisiana. District of Baton Rouge, La., Dept. of the Gulf, to June 1864. Provisional Brigade, District of Morganza, Dept. of the Gulf, to September 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, United States Colored Troops, District of Morganza, Dept. of the Gulf, to September 1864. Port Hudson, La., Dept. of the Gulf, to September 1864. Brazos Santiago, Texas, to October, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, United States Colored Troops, Dept. of the Gulf, to December 1864. Brazos Santiago, Texas, to June 1865. Dept. of Texas to March 1866.

Detailed ServiceEdit

Ordered to Baton Rouge, La., March 23, 1864, and duty there till June. Ordered to Morganza, La., and duty there till September. Expedition from Morganza to Bayou Sara September 6–7. Ordered to Brazos Santiago, Texas, September, and duty there till May 1865. Expedition from Brazos Santiago May 11–14. Action at Palmetto Ranch May 12–13, 1865. White's Ranch May 13. Last action of the war. Duty at various points in Texas till March 1866. Ordered to St. Louis via New Orleans, La. Mustered out March 31, 1866.

Founding of Lincoln UniversityEdit

One of the soldiers' most important achievements came at the end of the war. Between duties, and after the termination of hostilities, soldiers of the 62nd and 65th U.S. Colored Troops had been learning to read and write. The troops of these three regiments agreed that they wished to continue their studies as civilians. The soldiers and their officers signed resolutions pledging to work to establish a school "for the special benefit of free blacks". Troops of the 62nd U.S.C.T. were especially energetic in working towards this goal, raising $4,000 to support the establishment of the planned educational institution.[1] This effort eventually lead to the opening of the Lincoln Institute (now Lincoln University) in Jefferson City, Missouri, on September 16, 1866.[2]

CommandersEdit

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Arenson, Adam, The Great Heart of the West: St. Louis and the Cultural Civil War, (Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 2011) pp169-170
  2. ^ http://adamarenson.com/the-great-heart-of-the-republic/errata/

ReferencesEdit