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EventsEdit

When rain interrupted play on Centre Court on 3 July with a crowd that included Prince Michael of Kent, Princess Michael of Kent and actress Joanna Lumley,[3] Cliff Richard, who was watching from the royal box, was approached by court officials for an interview. They suggested that he sing a song or two to entertain the crowd.[4] With approval from his PR manager Richard proceeded to give an impromptu performance, starting with "Summer Holiday".[5]

The performance ran for twenty minutes and consisted of Richard's hits such as "Living Doll" and "Congratulations", as well as the Elvis Presley hit "All Shook Up".[5] Past tennis stars Virginia Wade, Martina Navratilova, Hana Mandlíková, Pam Shriver, Liz Smylie, Gigi Fernández and Conchita Martínez were in the Royal Box and proceeded to join in as background singers.[3][5]

Richard was not aware that his performance was televised by the BBC, and after six songs presenter Des Lynam jokingly claimed "we'll probably get one hell of a bill." The performance made the front pages in many major British newspapers on the following day. Since a retractable roof was completed on Centre Court in 2009 such a performance is unlikely to happen again.[6]

During the entrance of the court staff for the Men's Singles final, the court was briefly invaded by a streaker.[7]

Prize moneyEdit

The total prize money for 1996 championships was £6,465,910. The winner of the men's title earned £392,500 while the women's singles champion earned £353,000.[8][9]

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128
Men's Singles £392,500
Women's Singles £353,000
Men's Doubles * £160,810 N/A
Women's Doubles * £139,040 N/A
Mixed Doubles * £68,280 N/A

* per team

ChampionsEdit

SeniorsEdit

Men's SinglesEdit

  Richard Krajicek defeated   MaliVai Washington, 6–3, 6–4, 6–3 [10]

  • It was Krajicek's 1st and only career Grand Slam singles title. He became the first Dutchman to win a Grand Slam singles title and the first Dutch singles winner since Kea Bouman in 1926.

Women's SinglesEdit

  Steffi Graf defeated   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario, 6–3, 7–5 [11]

  • It was Graf's 20th career Grand Slam singles title and her 7th and last title at Wimbledon.

Men's DoublesEdit

  Todd Woodbridge /   Mark Woodforde defeated   Byron Black /   Grant Connell, 4–6, 6–1, 6–3, 6–2 [12]

  • It was Woodbridge's 10th career Grand Slam title and his 5th Wimbledon title. It was Woodforde's 11th career Grand Slam title and his 4th Wimbledon title.

Women's DoublesEdit

  Martina Hingis /   Helena Suková defeated   Meredith McGrath /   Larisa Neiland, 5–7, 7–5, 6–1 [13]

  • It was Hingis' 1st career Grand Slam doubles title. It was Suková's 9th and last career Grand Slam doubles title and her 4th title at Wimbledon.

Mixed DoublesEdit

  Cyril Suk /   Helena Suková defeated   Mark Woodforde /   Larisa Neiland, 1–6, 6–3, 6–2 [14]

  • It was Suk's 3rd career Grand Slam mixed doubles title and his 2nd title at Wimbledon. It was Suková's 4th career Grand Slam mixed doubles title and her 2nd title at Wimbledon.

JuniorsEdit

Boys' SinglesEdit

  Vladimir Voltchkov defeated   Ivan Ljubičić, 3–6, 6–2, 6–3 [15]

Girls' SinglesEdit

  Amélie Mauresmo defeated   Magüi Serna, 4–6, 6–3, 6–4 [16]

Boys' DoublesEdit

  Daniele Bracciali /   Jocelyn Robichaud defeated   Damien Roberts /   Wesley Whitehouse, 6–2, 6–4 [17]

Girls' DoublesEdit

  Olga Barabanschikova /   Amélie Mauresmo defeated   Lilia Osterloh /   Samantha Reeves, 5–7, 6–3, 6–1 [18]

InvitationEdit

Gentlemen's Invitation DoublesEdit

  Wojciech Fibak /   Tim Wilkison defeated   Pavel Složil /   Tomáš Šmíd, 6–2, 5–7, 6–1

Ladies' Invitation DoublesEdit

  Jo Durie /   Anne Smith defeated   Mima Jaušovec /   Yvonne Vermaak, 6–3, 6–2

Senior Gentlemen's Invitation DoublesEdit

  John Alexander /   Phil Dent defeated   Marty Riessen /   Sherwood Stewart, 7–6, 6–2

Singles seedsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Collins, Bud (2010). The Bud Collins History of Tennis (2nd ed.). [New York]: New Chapter Press. ISBN 978-0942257700.
  2. ^ Barrett, John (2001). Wimbledon : The Official History of the Championships. London: CollinsWillow. ISBN 0007117078.
  3. ^ a b Smith, Aiden (18 July 2004). "Sir Cliff's Wimbledon singalong was all a PR stunt". The Scotsman. Archived from the original on 2 July 2011. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  4. ^ "True Or False". cliffrichard.org. Archived from the original on 18 August 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  5. ^ a b c "3 July 1996: Cliff Richard sings at Wimbledon". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  6. ^ Gibson, Owen (22 April 2009). "Centre Court at Wimbledon has it covered after years of rain". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  7. ^ Williams, Richard (19 June 2009). "The magic of Wimbledon". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  8. ^ Little, Alan (2013). Wimbledon Compendium 2013 (23 ed.). London: All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club. pp. 327–334. ISBN 978-1899039401.
  9. ^ "About Wimbledon – Prize Money and Finance". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 8 October 2017.
  10. ^ "Gentlemen's Singles Finals 1877-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  11. ^ "Ladies' Singles Finals 1884-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  12. ^ "Gentlemen's Doubles Finals 1884-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  13. ^ "Ladies' Doubles Finals 1913-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  14. ^ "Mixed Doubles Finals 1913-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  15. ^ "Boys' Singles Finals 1947-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  16. ^ "Girls' Singles Finals 1947-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  17. ^ "Boys' Doubles Finals 1982-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 5 December 2017.
  18. ^ "Girls' Doubles Finals 1982-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 5 December 2017.

External linksEdit