1993 in video games

(Redirected from 1993 in video gaming)

1993 saw many sequels and prequels in video games, such as Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden, Mortal Kombat II, Secret of Mana, and Super Street Fighter II, along with new titles such as Disney's Aladdin, Doom, FIFA International Soccer, Gunstar Heroes, NBA Jam, Ridge Racer, Samurai Shodown, Star Fox and Virtua Fighter.

List of years in video games

The year's highest-grossing video game worldwide was Capcom's arcade fighting game Street Fighter II for the third year in a row, while again being the year's highest-grossing entertainment product. The year's best-selling home system worldwide was the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis video game console.

Top-rated gamesEdit

Game of the Year awardsEdit

The following titles won Game of the Year awards for 1993.

Awards Game of the Year Developer Publisher Genre Platform(s) Ref
Electronic Gaming Monthly (EGM) Samurai Shodown (Samurai Spirits) SNK SNK Fighting Neo Geo [1]
European Computer Trade Show [2]
Gamest Awards [3]
Chicago Tribune Star Fox Nintendo EAD Nintendo Rail shooter Super NES [4]
Electronic Gaming Awards Disney's Aladdin Virgin Games Sega Platformer Sega Genesis [5]
GameFan Golden Megawards Gunstar Heroes Treasure Sega Run-and-gun shooter [6]
Game Informer Mortal Kombat Midway Acclaim Entertainment Fighting Consoles [7]

Famitsu Platinum Hall of FameEdit

The following video game releases in 1993 entered Famitsu magazine's "Platinum Hall of Fame" for receiving Famitsu scores of at least 35 out of 40.[8]

Title Platform Developer Publisher Genre Score (out of 40)
Street Fighter II Turbo Super Famicom Capcom Capcom Fighting 36
Disney's Aladdin Sega Mega Drive Virgin Games Sega Platformer 35
Dragon Quest I & II Super Famicom Chunsoft Enix Role-playing 35

Financial performanceEdit

Highest-grossing arcade gamesEdit

Street Fighter II was the highest-grossing entertainment product of 1993, earning more than the film Jurassic Park.[9][10] The following table lists the year's top-grossing arcade games in Japan, the United Kingdom, United States, and worldwide.

Market Period Title Coin drop revenue Inflation Manufacturer Genre Ref
Japan Street Fighter II' Turbo Un­known Un­known Capcom Fighting [11]
United Kingdom January–June Street Fighter II $229 million $450 million Capcom Fighting [12]
United States NBA Jam $300 million+[13][14] $560 million+ Midway Sports [15][16]
Worldwide Street Fighter II $1.5 billion $2.9 billion Capcom Fighting [9]

JapanEdit

The following titles were the top ten highest-grossing arcade games of 1993 in Japan.

Rank Gamest[11] Game Machine[17]
Title Type Points
1 Street Fighter II' Turbo Street Fighter II / Dash / Turbo Software kit 7935
2 Garō Densetsu 2: Aratanaru Tatakai (Fatal Fury 2) Virtua Racing Twin / Deluxe 5415
3 Puyo Puyo Lethal Enforcers Dedicated 4005
4 Street Fighter II Dash (Champion Edition) Puyo Puyo Software kit 3531
5 Tenchi wo Kurau 2: Sekiheki no Tatakai (Warriors of Fate) Garō Densetsu 2: Aratanaru Tatakai Software kit 2934
6 Samurai Spirits (Samurai Shodown) Tetris (Sega) Software kit 2856
7 World Heroes 2 Coca-Cola Suzuka 8 Hours Deluxe / Standard 2852
8 Virtua Racing Columns Software kit 2697
9 Street Fighter II: The World Warrior Final Lap 3 Standard 2638
10 Art of Fighting Tenchi wo Kurau 2: Sekiheki no Tatakai Software kit 2074

United StatesEdit

In the United States, NBA Jam was the highest-grossing arcade game of 1993,[15] followed by Mortal Kombat; both games exceeded the $300,000,000 (equivalent to $560,000,000 in 2021) domestic box office gross of Jurassic Park that year.[13][14]

The following titles were the highest-grossing arcade video games of the year, according to the Amusement & Music Operators Association (AMOA) and American Amusement Machine Association (AAMA).

Rank AMOA[18][19] AMAA[20] Play Meter
Dedicated cabinet Arcade conversion kit Title Award
1 NBA Jam Mortal Kombat Mortal Kombat,
Mortal Kombat II,
NBA Jam,
Neo Geo MVS
Diamond NBA Jam[16]
2 Street Fighter II,
Lethal Enforcers,
Mortal Kombat,
Virtua Racing
Street Fighter II: Champion Edition,
Time Killers,
X-Men,
World Heroes
Un­known
3
4
5 Virtua Racing Platinum
6 Un­known OutRunners,
Time Killers
Gold
7
8 Un­known Crime Patrol,
Mad Dog II: The Lost Gold
Silver
9

Best-selling home systemsEdit

ConsolesEdit

Rank Manufacturer Game console Type Generation Sales
Japan USA Europe Korea Worldwide
1 Sega Mega Drive / Genesis Home 16-bit 500,000[21] 6,500,000[22] 2,260,000[23][21] 24,000[24] 9,284,000+
2 Nintendo Super NES Home 16-bit 2,200,000[21] 4,400,000[21] 1,661,000[25][21] 60,000[24] 8,321,000+
3 Nintendo Game Boy Handheld 8-bit 1,590,000[26] 1,500,000+ 625,000+[25] Un­known 3,715,000+
4 Sega Game Gear Handheld 8-bit 400,000[26] 1,500,000[22] 383,000+[23][25] Un­known 2,283,000+
5 Sega Sega CD / Mega-CD Home 16-bit 100,000[26] 800,000[22] 264,000[25][21] Un­known 1,164,000+
6 Nintendo NES / Famicom Home 8-bit 540,000[26] Un­known 555,000[25][21] 50,000[24] 1,145,000+
7 Sega Sega Master System Home 8-bit 700,000[21] 80,000[24] 780,000+
8 NEC PC Engine Home 16-bit 400,000[26] Un­known Un­known Un­known 400,000+
9 Fujitsu FM Towns Marty Home 32-bit 45,000[27] 45,000
10 Panasonic 3DO Home 32-bit 40,000+[28] 40,000+

ComputersEdit

Rank Manufacturer Computer architecture Sales
Japan Worldwide
1 Apple Inc. Apple Macintosh 3,300,000[29]
2 IBM IBM PC 2,075,000[30]
3 Compaq Computer IBM PC compatible 1,418,000[30]
4 NEC NEC PC-98 1,200,000[31][32] 1,200,000+
5 Packard Bell IBM PC compatible 997,000[30]
6 Dell IBM PC compatible 795,000[30]
7 Gateway 2000 IBM PC compatible 644,000[30]
8 AST Research IBM PC compatible 530,000[30]
9 Tandy Corporation IBM PC compatible 350,000[30]
10 Toshiba IBM PC compatible 316,000[30]

Best-selling home video gamesEdit

The following titles were the top ten best-selling home video games (console games or computer games) of 1993 with known sales figures.

Rank Title Platform Publisher Genre Sales
Japan[33] UK[34] Worldwide
1 Street Fighter II Multi-platform Capcom Fighting 1,314,000+ Un­known 5,000,000[35][36]
2 Mortal Kombat Multi-platform Acclaim Fighting Un­known 400,000+ 3,000,000+[37][38]
3 Star Fox Super NES Nintendo Rail shooter 325,000 Un­known 1,700,000+[39]
4 Disney's Aladdin Mega Drive/Genesis Virgin Platformer Un­known Un­known 1,600,000+[40]
5 Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden Super NES Bandai Fighting 1,300,000+[41] 1,300,000+
6 Seiken Densetsu 2 (Secret of Mana) Super NES Squaresoft Action RPG 1,002,000 1,002,000+
7 Super Mario Collection (All-Stars) Super NES Nintendo Platformer 877,000 Un­known 877,000+
8 Romancing SaGa 2 Super Famicom Squaresoft RPG 823,000 823,000
9 Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2 Super Famicom Bandai Fighting 740,000 740,000
10 Super Mario Kart Super NES Nintendo Kart racing 450,000 250,000+ 700,000+

JapanEdit

In Japan, the following titles were the top ten best-selling home video games of 1993.

Rank Title Developer Platform Publisher Genre Sales Ref
1 Street Fighter II Turbo Capcom Super Famicom Capcom Fighting 1,314,000 [33]
2 Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden TOSE Super Famicom Bandai Fighting 1,300,000+ [41]
3 Seiken Densetsu 2 (Secret of Mana) Squaresoft Super Famicom Squaresoft Action RPG 1,002,000 [33]
4 Super Mario Collection (Super Mario All-Stars) Nintendo EAD Super Famicom Nintendo Platformer 877,000
5 Romancing SaGa 2 Squaresoft Super Famicom Squaresoft RPG 823,000
6 Dragon Ball Z: Super Butōden 2 TOSE Super Famicom Bandai Fighting 740,000
7 J. League Soccer Prime Goal Namco Super Famicom Namco Sports 610,000
8 Dragon Quest I & II Chunsoft Super Famicom Enix RPG 567,000
9 Torneko no Daibōken: Fushigi no Dungeon Chunsoft Super Famicom Chunsoft Roguelike 510,000
10 Super Bomberman Produce! Super Famicom Hudson Soft Maze 497,000

EuropeEdit

In Europe, the following titles were the top two best-selling 1993 releases during the first quarter of the year.[42]

Rank Title Platform Developer(s) Publisher Genre
1 Super Mario Kart Super Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo EAD Nintendo Kart racing
2 Streets of Rage II Sega Mega Drive Sega, Ancient Sega Beat 'em up

In the United Kingdom, the following titles were the top ten best-selling home video games of 1993.[34]

Rank Title Platform(s) Publisher(s) Genre Sales
1 Mortal Kombat Game consoles Acclaim Entertainment Fighting 400,000+
2 Sonic the Hedgehog 2 Sega Mega Drive Sega Platformer 400,000+
3 Lemmings Multi-platform Various Strategy 400,000+
4 Super Kick Off Game consoles Various Sports 400,000+
5 FIFA International Soccer Sega Mega Drive Electronic Arts Sports 400,000
6 Ecco the Dolphin Sega Mega Drive Sega Action-adventure 250,000+
7 Super Mario Kart Super NES Nintendo Kart racing 250,000+
8 Jurassic Park Multi-platform Ocean Software Action 250,000+
9 Jungle Strike Game consoles Electronic Arts Shoot 'em up 250,000
10 PGA Tour Golf II Sega Mega Drive Electronic Arts Sports 200,000

United StatesEdit

In the United States, the following titles were the top two highest-grossing home video game franchises in 1993.[43]

Franchise Publisher Revenue Inflation
Mario Nintendo $500,000,000 $940,000,000
Sonic the Hedgehog Sega $500,000,000 $940,000,000

The following titles were the best-selling home video games of each month for video game consoles (home consoles and handheld consoles) in 1993, according to Babbage's (reported by Electronic Gaming Monthly and Electronic Games), Mega (for the Sega Genesis in January), and The NPD Group (for the Super NES and Genesis in July).

Month NES Super NES Sega Genesis Sega CD Game Boy Game Gear Ref
January Tecmo Super Bowl Street Fighter II Sonic the Hedgehog 2 Un­known Super Mario Land 2 Sonic the Hedgehog 2 [44][45]
February Bulls vs. Blazers John Madden Football '93 Road Avenger Columns [46]
March Tecmo NBA Basketball Street Fighter II PGA Tour Golf II Sonic the Hedgehog 2 [47]
April Star Fox X-Men Willy Beamish [48]
May Jaguar XJ220 [49]
June Kirby's Adventure Batman Returns [50]
July Super Mario Kart Final Fight CD [51][52]
August Jurassic Park Street Fighter II Turbo Jurassic Park Link's Awakening Tom and Jerry [53]
September Mortal Kombat Mortal Kombat Batman Returns Mortal Kombat Mortal Kombat [54]
October Tetris 2 Disney's Aladdin Joe Montana Football [55][56]
November Tecmo Super Bowl Madden NFL '94 Lethal Enforcers Kirby's Dream Land [57][58]
December Madden NFL '94 Sonic CD Mortal Kombat [59]

The following titles were the year's top six best-selling PC games on CD-ROM format in the United States.[60]

Rank Title Publisher Genre
1 The 7th Guest Virgin Interactive Interactive movie
2 Star Wars: Rebel Assault LucasArts Rail shooter
3 King's Quest VI Sierra On-Line Adventure
4 Return to Zork Activision
5 Just Grandma & Me Brøderbund
6 Dracula Unleashed Viacom New Media

EventsEdit

BusinessEdit

Notable releasesEdit

ArcadeEdit

Date Title Dev. / Pub. Notes
July Samurai Shodown SNK '93 Game Of The Year voted on by Electronic Gaming Monthly
August Daytona USA Sega One of the most impactful racing games of all time[65]
October Ridge Racer Namco -
November Virtua Fighter Sega The first fully polygonal fighting game, and a major influence on subsequent 3D fighting games
December NBA Jam Midway Being one of the first sports games with official licensed teams and players, it became a cult classic. It was also the highest-earning arcade game of all time.[66]
Late 1993 Mortal Kombat II Midway Overshadowed the critical and commercial success of the original Mortal Kombat, becoming one of the most well-known fighting games of all time

HomeEdit

Date Title Dev. / Pub. Platform Notes
February X-Wing LucasArts PC -
February Star Fox Nintendo SNES The first game to use the Super FX chip
March Kirby's Adventure Nintendo NES Introduced Kirby's ability to take on the powers of enemies he has eaten, which would go on to become a staple of the franchise.
April The 7th Guest Virgin Interactive PC Sold over two million copies and was widely regarded as one of three "killer apps" that accelerated the sales of CD-ROM drives (the other two being Myst & Doom).[67]
June Dalek Attack Alternative Software ZX Spectrum The last full-price game released for the platform by a mainstream publisher.
June Day of the Tentacle LucasArts PC -
June The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening Nintendo Game Boy
June Syndicate Electronic Arts PC -
July Super Mario All-Stars Nintendo SNES Featured upgraded 16-bit versions of the first four Super Mario games.
August Return to Zork Activision PC -
September Master of Orion MicroProse PC -
September Sonic CD Sega Sega CD
September Myst Broderbund PC The best-selling PC title until 2002, with 6 million units sold.[68] Widely regarded as one of three "killer apps" that accelerated the sales of CD-ROM drives (the other two being The 7th Guest & Doom).[67]
November Sam & Max Hit the Road LucasArts PC -
November Disney's Aladdin Virgin Genesis Crowned "Genesis Game of The Year" at the Electronic Gaming Awards (aka the Arcade Awards aka the Arkies) voted on by the public.
December Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers Sierra PC -
December Doom Id Software PC Widely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential games of all time, especially in the first-person-shooter genre.
December Mega Man X Capcom SNES -

HardwareEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Electronic Gaming Monthly's Buyer's Guide. 1994.
  2. ^ "EGM is Number One in Europe!". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 59. Sendai Publishing. June 1994. p. 14.
  3. ^ "第7回 ゲーメスト大賞" [7th Gamest Awards]. Gamest (in Japanese). Vol. 107 (February 1994). December 27, 1993. pp. 20-43 (20). alternate url
  4. ^ Carter, Chip; Carter, Jonathan (January 7, 1994). "Super Nintendo Dominated the Fab 15 List for '93". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved October 28, 2021.
  5. ^ "The Electronic Gaming Awards: Here are YOUR Picks for the Best Interactive Entertainment". Electronic Games. Vol. 2, no. 7 (May 1994). April 21, 1993. pp. 30–4.
  6. ^ GameFan, volume 2, issue 2 (January 1994), pages 54-58 (PDF)
  7. ^ "25 Years Of Game Informer's GOTY Awards". Game Informer. January 2, 2017. Archived from the original on December 30, 2017. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  8. ^ "週刊ファミ通クロスレビュープラチナ殿堂入りソフト一覧" [Weekly Famitsu Cross Review Platinum Hall of Fame Software List]. Geimin (in Japanese). Archived from the original on October 27, 2008. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  9. ^ a b Goldstein, Jeffrey H. (1998). "Immortal Kombat: War Toys and Violent Video Games". Why We Watch: The Attractions of Violent Entertainment. Oxford University Press. pp. 53-68 (53). ISBN 978-0-19-802790-4. Its financial success was exceeded only by a video game with violence as its theme. "One single game–StreetFighter II–made $1.5 billion last year [1993]. Nothing, not even Jurassic Park, touched that success in the entertainment business," said screenwriter Michael Backes (quoted in Covington, 1994).
  10. ^ Sheff, David (1994). Video Games: A Guide for Savvy Parents. Random House. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-679-75282-0. But "Street Fighter II" has none of the charm and whimsy of the "Turtle" games and none of the innocence of other martial-arts games such as the first "Double Dragon." This game, depicting only brutal street fighting, was the biggest hit of 1992 and 1993, selling a worldwide total of 8 million copies
  11. ^ a b "第7回 ゲーメスト大賞 〜 ヒットゲーム BEST 10 〜 インカム中心" [7th Gamest Awards – Hit Games: Best 10 – Income Center]. Gamest (in Japanese). Vol. 107 (February 1994). December 27, 1993. pp. 20-43 (39). alternate url
  12. ^ "The making of Street Fighter 2 - a video game legend" (PDF). Mega. No. 10 (July 1993). June 17, 1993. pp. 14-35 (18-21).
  13. ^ a b McKanic, Patricia Ann (March 24, 1994). "Video values: It's a whole new game for the industry". Lakeland Ledger. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  14. ^ a b McKanic, Patricia Ann (April 3, 1994). "Games more complex, but also more violent". Times Daily. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  15. ^ a b "NBA Jam". GamePro. No. 56. IDG. March 1994. p. 188.
  16. ^ a b "1993". Play Meter. Vol. 20, no. 13. December 1994. p. 90.
  17. ^ "Overseas Readers Column: "SF II: CE Turbo" And "Lethal Enforcers" Top" (PDF). Game Machine (in Japanese). No. 464. Amusement Press, Inc. January 1–15, 1994. p. 36.
  18. ^ "The AMOA Awards". RePlay. Vol. 19, no. 2. November 1993. p. 87.
  19. ^ "AMOA Award Nominees: Game Awards". RePlay. Vol. 19, no. 1. October 1993. p. 59.
  20. ^ "ACME '94: Play Meter, AAMA salute best games". Play Meter. 20 (5): ACME 73-4. April 1994.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h "Finance & Business". Screen Digest. March 1995. pp. 56–62. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  22. ^ a b c "SEGA - Hardware Estimates". Proceedings. The Conference. 1994. p. 125. Genesis   GameGear   CD‑ROM
    1993   6.5   1.5   0.8
  23. ^ a b "The Interview: Mr Patrick Lavanant" (PDF). MEGA Force (in French). No. 27. April 1994. pp. 18-21 (19).
  24. ^ a b c d 게임월드 [Game World] (in Korean). 1994.
  25. ^ a b c d e "Market size and market shares". Video Games: A Report on the Supply of Video Games in the UK. United Kingdom: Monopolies and Mergers Commission (MMC), H.M. Stationery Office. April 1995. pp. 66 to 68. ISBN 978-0-10-127812-6.
  26. ^ a b c d e 小川 (Ogawa), 純生 (Sumio) (December 14, 2010). "テレビゲーム機の変遷 —ファミコン、スーパーファミコン、プレステ、プレステ2、Wiiまで—" [Recent Developments in Video Game Technology in Japan — Famicom, Super Famicom, Play Station, Play Station 2 and Wii —] (PDF). 経営論集 (Keiei Ronshū) (in Japanese) (published March 2011) (77): 1-17 (2). ISSN 0286-6439. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 25, 2015. Retrieved December 6, 2021 – via Toyo University Academic Information Repository (Toyo University).
  27. ^ 清水欣一『富士通のマルチメディア・ビジネス』オーエス出版社、May 15, 1995第1刷、March 14, 1997第4刷、ISBN 4-87190-415-6、151頁。
  28. ^ "3DO Sales Called Pleasing". The New York Times. November 20, 1993. Archived from the original on May 26, 2015. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  29. ^ Reimer, Jeremy (December 15, 2005). "Total share: 30 years of personal computer market share figures". Ars Technica. Retrieved November 27, 2021.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h "Windows Magazine". Windows Magazine. Vol. 5, no. 3. March 1994. p. 38.
  31. ^ Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L. (August 20, 1998). Asia's Computer Challenge: Threat or Opportunity for the United States and the World?. Oxford University Press. p. 83. ISBN 978-0-19-028398-8.
  32. ^ "Japan". U.S. Industrial Outlook. U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industrial Economics. 1994. p. 26-19.
  33. ^ a b c "1993年のコンシューマーゲームソフトの売上Top30" [1993 Consumer Game Software Sales: Top 30]. Dengeki Oh (in Japanese). MediaWorks. Archived from the original on September 19, 2001. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  34. ^ a b "Top-Selling Video Game Titles In UK — 1993 (All Formats)". Screen Digest. Screen Digest Limited: 110. 1994. nb sales level at number 5 = 400,000 units, at number 9 = 250,000 units, at number 10 = 200,000 units
    Source: Gallup-ELSPA/Electronic Arts/CTW
  35. ^ Japan Economic Almanac. Japan Economic Journal. 1994. p. 90. ISBN 978-4-532-67504-2. As for video-game software, accumulated sales of Capcom Co.'s Street Fighter II series reached 10 million units in 1993, compared with 15 million units of Enix Inc.'s Dragon Quest series and 100 million units of Nintendo's Super Mario series.
  36. ^ Tokyo Business Today. Toyo Keizai Shinposha (The Oriental Economist). 1993. p. 38. The most important new contributor to Sega is Capcom Co., producer of the phenomenally successful Street Fighter II (five million unit sales last year). Capcom is widely known as the single biggest outside contributor to the Nintendo legend, but will launch software designed for Sega this spring.
  37. ^ Ali, Reyan (October 22, 2019). NBA Jam. Boss Fight Books. p. 138. ISBN 978-1-940535-20-3.
  38. ^ "Mortal Kombat kicks butt". Mega Zone. No. 36 (February 1994). January 26, 1994. p. 11.
  39. ^ "Nintendo sells 100-millionth 'Mario' game". United Press International (UPI). June 2, 1993. Retrieved December 18, 2021.
  40. ^ "Movie-game links continue to get stronger". Screen Digest. Screen Digest Limited: 272. 1993. Major video game players Nintendo and Sega are both pushing hard to cash in on game spin-offs from Disney blockbuster animated feature Aladdin. In US, Sega (...) shipped 800,000 units of Virgin-developed Aladdin for Genesis/Mega Drive in same week as some 30m sell-through video units hit the street (10.8m selling through in three days). Another 800,000 units have been shipped in Europe, 50 per cent as hardware bundles.
  41. ^ a b Torishima, Kazuhiko (September 1993). "ドラゴンボールZ外伝 -サイヤ人絶滅計画-". V Jump (in Japanese). No. 11. Shueisha. pp. 49–53.
  42. ^ "Count Down Hot 100: Worldwide!". Famicom Tsūshin (in Japanese). No. 226. April 16, 1993. p. 89.
  43. ^ Seigel, Jessica (July 10, 1994). "Interactive Frenzy". Sun-Sentinel. Archived from the original on May 22, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
  44. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 44. March 1993. p. 40.
  45. ^ "Top 20: The Charts" (PDF). Mega. No. 7 (April 1993). March 18, 1993. p. 10.
  46. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 45. April 1993. p. 40.
  47. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 46. May 1993. p. 40.
  48. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 47. June 1993. p. 46.
  49. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 48. July 1993. p. 42.
  50. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 49. August 1993. p. 44.
  51. ^ "Top 10 Video Games". Wired. 1993. Retrieved October 18, 2021.
  52. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 50. September 1993. p. 44.
  53. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 51. October 1993. p. 50.
  54. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 52. November 1993. p. 56.
  55. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 53. December 1993. p. 60.
  56. ^ "Top Video Games". Electronic Games. Reese Publishing Company. January 1994. p. 16. ISSN 0730-6687. Archived from the original on November 6, 2015. Retrieved December 31, 2014.
  57. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 54. January 1994. p. 58.
  58. ^ "Top Video Games: As of November 22, 1993". Electronic Games. Vol. 2, no. 5 (February 1994). January 20, 1994. p. 24.
  59. ^ "EGM Top Ten". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 55. February 1994. p. 52.
  60. ^ "Top-Selling CD-ROM Titles in US 1993". Screen Digest. Screen Digest Limited: 110. 1994. nb 1 and 2 above were placed at 3 and 10 in the top-selling PC games of all types.
    Source: PC Data (sales by 10 retail chains representing over 1,300 stores)
  61. ^ "Game Over". Kirkus Reviews. February 1, 1993.
  62. ^ Graunke, Julie (May 11, 1993). "FuncoLand opens in Crystal Lake". Northwest Herald. Woodstock, Illinois. p. 31 – via Newspapers.com.
  63. ^ "In brief". Star Tribune. Minneapolis. August 4, 1993. p. 33 – via Newspapers.com.
  64. ^ O'Leary, Jay (October 1, 1993). "Learning to fly". AllBusiness.com. Retrieved January 27, 2010.
  65. ^ Freeman, Will (October 6, 2017). "Daytona USA: why the best arcade racing game ever just won't go away". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  66. ^ "NBA Jam". GamePro. No. 66. IDG. March 1994. p. 188.
  67. ^ a b Wolf, Mark J. P. (2008). The Video Game Explosion: A History from PONG to Playstation and Beyond. ABC-CLIO. p. 129. ISBN 9780313338687.
  68. ^ "15 Things You Might Not Know About Myst". April 23, 2015. Retrieved January 2, 2018.