1992 United States gubernatorial elections

United States gubernatorial elections were held on November 3, 1992, in 12 states and two territories. Going into the elections, six of the seats were held by Democrats and six by Republicans. After the elections, eight seats were held by Democrats and four by Republicans. The elections coincided with the presidential election.

1992 United States gubernatorial elections

← 1991 November 3, 1992 1993 →

14 governorships
12 states; 2 territories
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Seats before 28 20
Seats after 30 18
Seat change Increase2 Decrease2
Seats up 6 6
Seats won 8 4

1992 Rhode Island gubernatorial election1992 Delaware gubernatorial election1992 Indiana gubernatorial election1992 Missouri gubernatorial election1992 Montana gubernatorial election1992 New Hampshire gubernatorial election1992 North Carolina gubernatorial election1992 North Dakota gubernatorial election1992 Utah gubernatorial election1992 Vermont gubernatorial election1992 Washington gubernatorial election1992 West Virginia gubernatorial election1992 Puerto Rico gubernatorial election1992 American Samoa gubernatorial election1992 United States gubernatorial elections results map.svg
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     Democratic gain      Democratic hold
     Republican gain      Republican hold
     New Progressive gain      Nonpartisan

This was the last year in which Rhode Island held a gubernatorial election in the same year as the presidential election. The length of gubernatorial terms for Rhode Island's governor would be extended from two to four years, with elections taking place in midterm election years.

Election resultsEdit

StatesEdit

State Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
Delaware Mike Castle Republican 1984 Incumbent term-limited.
New governor elected.
Democratic gain.
  •  Y Tom Carper (Democratic) 64.7%
  • B. Gary Scott (Republican) 32.7%
  • Floyd E. McDowell (A Delaware Party) 1.4%
  • Richard A. Cohen (Libertarian) 1.1%
Indiana Evan Bayh Democratic 1988 Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri John Ashcroft Republican 1984 Incumbent term-limited.
New governor elected.
Democratic gain.
Montana Stan Stephens Republican 1988 Incumbent retired.
New governor elected.
Republican hold.
New Hampshire Judd Gregg Republican 1988 Incumbent retired to run for U.S. Senator.
New governor elected.
Republican hold.
North Carolina James G. Martin Republican 1984 Incumbent term-limited.
New governor elected.
Democratic gain.
  •  Y Jim Hunt (Democratic) 52.7%
  • Jim Gardner (Republican) 43.2%
  • Scott McLaughlin (Libertarian) 4.0%
North Dakota George A. Sinner Democratic–NPL 1984 Incumbent retired.
New governor elected.
Republican gain.
Rhode Island Bruce Sundlun Democratic 1990 Incumbent re-elected.
  •  Y Bruce Sundlun (Democratic) 61.6%
  • Elizabeth A. Leonard (Republican) 34.3%
  • Joseph F. Devine (Independent) 3.4%
Utah Norman H. Bangerter Republican 1984 Incumbent retired.
New governor elected.
Republican hold.
Vermont Howard Dean Democratic 1991[a] Incumbent elected to full term.
  •  Y Howard Dean (Democratic) 74.7%
  • John McClaughry (Republican) 23.0%
  • Richard F. Gottlieb (Liberty Union) 1.1%
  • August Jaccaci (Natural Law) 1.0%
Washington Booth Gardner Democratic 1984 Incumbent retired.
New governor elected.
Democratic hold.
West Virginia Gaston Caperton Democratic 1988 Incumbent re-elected.

TerritoriesEdit

Territory Incumbent Party First
elected
Result Candidates
American Samoa Peter Tali Coleman Republican 1988 Incumbent lost re-election.
New governor elected.[1]
Democratic gain.
Puerto Rico Rafael Hernández Colón Popular Democratic 1984 Incumbent retired.
New governor elected.
New Progressive gain.

Closest racesEdit

States where the margin of victory was under 5%:

  1. Montana, 2.7%
  2. Puerto Rico, 4.0%
  3. Washington, 4.3%

States where the margin of victory was under 10%:

  1. Utah, 8.6%
  2. North Carolina, 9.5%

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Dean took office after his predecessor (Richard Snelling) died.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "AS Governor Race - Nov 03, 1992". Our Campaigns. January 1, 2006.

See alsoEdit