1991 Swedish general election

General elections were held in Sweden on 15 September 1991.[1] The Swedish Social Democratic Party remained the largest party in the Riksdag, winning 138 of the 349 seats.[2] However, it was the party's worst showing since 1928 with 37.7% of the vote.[3]

1991 Swedish general election

← 1988 15 September 1991 1994 →

All 349 seats in the Riksdag
175 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Ingvar Carlsson.jpg Carl Bildt 2001-05-15.jpg Bengt Westerberg2.jpg
Leader Ingvar Carlsson Carl Bildt Bengt Westerberg
Party Social Democrats Moderate Liberal People's
Last election 156 66 44
Seats won 138 80 33
Seat change Decrease18 Increase14 Decrease11
Popular vote 2,062,761 1,199,394 499,356
Percentage 37.71% 21.92% 9.13%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Olof Johansson2.jpg Alf Svensson 2003-08-25 001 (cropped).jpg Ian Wachtmeister.JPGBertKarlsson 2003-03-10 001.jpg
Leader Olof Johansson Alf Svensson Ian Wachtmeister
Bert Karlsson
Party Centre Christian Democrats New Democracy
Last election 42 0
Seats won 31 26 25
Seat change Decrease11 Increase26 New
Popular vote 465,175 390,351 368,281
Percentage 8.50% 7.14% 6.73%

  Seventh party
  Bundesarchiv Bild 183-N0701-023, Berlin, Erich Honecker, Lars Werner cropped.jpg
Leader Lars Werner
Party Left
Last election 21
Seats won 16
Seat change Decrease5
Popular vote 246,905
Percentage 4.51%

Riksdagsvalet 1991.svg
Map of the election, showing the distribution of constituency and levelling seats, as well as the largest political bloc within each constituency.

Prime Minister before election

Ingvar Carlsson
Social Democrats

Elected Prime Minister

Carl Bildt
Moderate

The election was notable due to the rise of a new right-wing populist party named New Democracy which succeeded in securing a parliamentary mandate for the first (and only) time. The four parties of the centre-right coalition (the Centre Party, People's Party, Moderates, and Christian Democrats) were allocated a combined total of 171 seats, 17 more than the two left-wing parties' 154, but still fewer than the 175 necessary for a majority. Thus the centre-right bloc was dependent upon New Democracy to secure a parliamentary majority. It was able to do so, and the Moderates' Carl Bildt became Prime Minister.

One large factor in the shift between the blocs was that the Christian Democrats managed to reach the 4% threshold by a good margin after many previous attempts. This combined with the Green Party falling short of the threshold, meant vast changes to areas yielding wins for the blue bloc. Norrköping, Västerås and Örebro, main urban areas inside the left-wing industrial belt of central Sweden, all voted blue for the first time for generations.[3] Even so, they did only assemble pluralities as opposed to majorities in all three. The centre-right bloc also made vast gains in the capital region, the Moderate Party being the largest both in Stockholm Municipality and the surrounding Stockholm County. Led by the strong Moderate vote, Malmö also flipped to a blue plurality, overturning another historical Social Democrat stronghold.

This election was also famous for the performance of the Donald Duck Party, which collected 1,535 votes, enough to make it the 9th largest in Sweden. The protest party's platform consisted of the demand for "free liquor and wider sidewalks."

ResultsEdit

 
PartyVotes%Seats+/–
Swedish Social Democratic Party2,062,76137.71138–18
Moderate Party1,199,39421.9280+14
Liberal People's Party499,3569.1333–11
Centre Party465,1758.5031–11
Christian Democratic Society Party390,3517.1426+26
New Democracy368,2816.7325New
Left Party246,9054.5116–5
Green Party185,0513.380–20
Sjöbopartiet27,6350.510New
Sweden Democrats4,8770.0900
Labour List3,6450.070New
Workers Party – Communists2,9690.0500
Other parties14,3610.2600
Total5,470,761100.003490
Valid votes5,470,76198.34
Invalid/blank votes92,1591.66
Total votes5,562,920100.00
Registered voters/turnout6,413,40786.74
Source: Nohlen & Stöver, SCB

Seat distributionEdit

Constituency Total
seats
Seats won
By party By coalition
S M F C KD ND V Right Left Others
Älvsborg North 10 4 2 1 1 1 1 5 4 1
Älvsborg South 8 3 2 1 1 1 5 3
Blekinge 5 3 1 1 2 3
Bohus 12 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 6 5 1
Fyrstadskretsen 19 7 6 2 1 1 1 1 10 8 1
Gävleborg 13 6 2 1 1 1 1 1 5 7 1
Gothenburg 17 6 5 2 1 1 1 1 9 7 1
Gotland 2 1 1 1 1
Halland 10 3 3 1 1 1 1 6 3 1
Jämtland 5 3 1 1 2 3
Jönköping 12 5 2 1 1 2 1 6 5 1
Kalmar 11 4 2 1 2 1 1 6 4 1
Kopparberg 12 5 2 1 1 1 1 1 5 6 1
Kristianstad 11 4 3 1 1 1 1 6 4 1
Kronoberg 9 3 2 1 1 1 1 5 3 1
Malmöhus 13 5 4 1 1 1 1 7 5 1
Norrbotten 10 6 1 1 1 1 3 7
Örebro 12 5 2 1 1 1 1 1 5 6 1
Östergötland 17 8 4 1 1 1 1 1 7 9 1
Skaraborg 11 4 2 1 2 1 1 6 4 1
Södermanland 11 5 2 1 1 1 1 5 5 1
Stockholm County 37 11 12 5 2 2 3 2 21 13 3
Stockholm Municipality 26 8 9 3 1 1 2 2 14 10 2
Uppsala 11 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 5 5 1
Värmland 12 5 2 1 1 1 1 1 5 6 1
Västerbotten 10 5 1 1 1 1 1 4 6
Västernorrland 12 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 7 1
Västmanland 11 5 2 1 1 1 1 5 5 1
Total 349 138 80 33 31 26 25 16 170 154 25
Source: Statistics Sweden

By municipalityEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1858 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1873
  3. ^ a b "Allmänna valen 1991. Del 1, Riksdagsvalet den 15 september 1991" (PDF) (in Swedish). Statistical Central Bureau. Retrieved 18 November 2019.