1987 European Amateur Team Championship

The 1987 European Amateur Team Championship took place from 24 to 28 June at Golfclub Murhof, in Frohnleiten, Austria. It was the 15th men's golf European Amateur Team Championship.

1987 European Amateur Team Championship
European Amateur Team Championship men's golf 1987.jpg
Tournament information
Dates24–28 June 1987
LocationFrohnleiten, Austria
47°13′48″N 15°19′26″E / 47.230°N 15.324°E / 47.230; 15.324
Course(s)Golfclub Murhof
Organized byEuropean Golf Association
FormatQualification round: 36 holes stroke play
Knock-out match-play
Statistics
Par72
Length6,705 yards (6,131 m)
Field19 teams
114 players
Champion
 Ireland
Neil Anderson, Pádraig Hogan,
Garth McGimpsey, John McHenry,
Liam McNamara, Eoghan O'Connell
Qualification round: 717 (−3)
Final match: 412–212
Location Map
Location in Europe
Location in Austria
Location in Styria
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VenueEdit

The club was founded in 1963 and its course, located 15 kilometers north of Graz in Styria, Austria, was constructed by Dr. Bernhard von Limburger.

The championship course was set up with par 72.[1]

FormatEdit

Each team consisted of six players, playing two rounds of an opening stroke-play qualifying competition over two days, counting the five best scores each day for each team.

The eight best teams formed flight A, in knock-out match-play over the next three days. The teams were seeded based on their positions after the stroke play. The first placed team were drawn to play the quarter final against the eight placed team, the second against the seventh, the third against the sixth and the fourth against the fifth. Teams were allowed to use six players during the team matches, selecting four of them in the two morning foursome games and five players in to the afternoon single games. Games all square at the 18th hole were declared halved, if the team match was already decided.

The seven teams placed 9–15 in the qualification stroke-play formed flight B and the four teams placed 16–19 formed flight C, to play similar knock-out play to decide their final positions.

TeamsEdit

19 nation teams contested the event. Each team consisted of six players.[2]

Players in the leading teams

Country Players
  England Paul Broadhurst, David Curry, Robert Eggo, Peter McEvoy, Jeremy Robinson, Roger Roper
  France Patrice Barques, Eric Giraud, François Illouz, Thomas Levet, Marc Pendaries, Romain Victor
  Ireland Neil Anderson, Pádraig Hogan, Garth McGimpsey, John McHenry, Liam McNamara, Eoghan O'Connell
  Scotland David Carrick, Paul Girvan, George Macgregor, Jim Milligan, Colin Montgomerie, Graem Shaw
  Sweden Dennis Edlund, Anders Haglund, Cristian Härdin, Per-Ulrik Johansson, John Lindberg, Fredrik Lindgren
  Wales Stephen Dodd, Michael Macara, Paul Mayo, Richard Morris, Phillip Price, D. K. Wood
  West Germany Rainer Mund, Hans-Günther Reiter, Andreas Riß, Andreas Roehrich, Ulrich Schulte, Sven Strüver

Other participating teams

Country
  Austria
  Czechoslovakia
  Denmark
  Finland
  Iceland
  Italy
  Netherlands
  Norway
  Portugal
  Spain
   Switzerland
  Yugoslavia

WinnersEdit

Team England won the opening 36-hole competition, with a score of 6 under par 714.

Individual leader was Jeremy Robinson, England, with a 6-under-par score of 138, one stroke ahead of John McHenry, Ireland.

Team Ireland won the gold medal, earning their fourth title, beating England in the final 4.5–2.5. Team France earned the bronze on third place, after beating Sweden 5.5–1.5 in the bronze match.[3]

ResultsEdit

Qualification round

Flight A

Flight B

Bracket

Flight C

 
Round 1Match for 16th place
 
      
 
 
 
 
  Czech Republic4
 
 
 
  Portugal3
 
  Finland5
 
 
 
  Czech Republic2
 
  Finland6
 
 
  Yugoslavia1
 
Match for 18th place
 
 
 
 
 
  Portugal6
 
 
  Yugoslavia1

Final standings

Place Country
    Ireland
    England
    France
4   Sweden
5   Scotland
6   Wales
7   West Germany
8   Spain
9    Switzerland
10   Italy
11   Netherlands
12   Austria
13   Denmark
14   Iceland
15   Norway
16   Finland
17   Czechoslovakia
18   Portugal
19   Yugoslavia

Sources:[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Anlagae, Golfplatz" (in German). Golfclub Murhof. Retrieved 5 April 2021.
  2. ^ Hennesy, John (24 June 1987). "Canny Scots lay out defence in the hills". The Times. p. 42.
  3. ^ a b Nordlund, Anders (August 1987). "EM herrar, Luften gick ur svenskarna" [Men's European Championship, The Swedes lost their breath]. Svensk Golf (in Swedish). No. 8. pp. 44–46, 90. Retrieved 5 April 2021.
  4. ^ Jansson, Anders (2004). Golf - Den stora sporten [Golf - The great sport] (in Swedish). Swedish Golf Federation. pp. 188–190. ISBN 91-86818007. Retrieved 5 April 2021.
  5. ^ "Mannschafts-Europameisterschaften" (PDF). golf.de, German Golf Federation. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 November 2021. Retrieved 30 March 2021.
  6. ^ "European Amateur Team Championship, 1987 – Murhof, Austria". European Golf Association. Retrieved 5 April 2021.
  7. ^ Burnside, Elsbeth (27 June 1987). "Missed 30-inch putt costs Scots European crown". The Glasgow Herald. p. 21. Retrieved 5 April 2021.
  8. ^ Hennesy, John (25 June 1987). "England calling the tune in chase for European crown". The Times. p. 42.
  9. ^ Hennesy, John (26 June 1987). "Another fine round by Robinson as British teams reach next stage". The Times. p. 39.
  10. ^ Hennesy, John (29 June 1987). "O'Connell is Irish hero in triumph". The Times. p. 38.

External linksEdit