1986 UEFA Cup Final

The 1986 UEFA Cup Final was an association football tie played on 30 April and 6 May 1986 between Real Madrid of Spain and Köln of West Germany. Madrid won 5–3 on aggregate and, in doing so, successfully defended their UEFA Cup title from the year prior.

1986 UEFA Cup Final
Event1985–86 UEFA Cup
on aggregate
First leg
Date30 April 1986
VenueSantiago Bernabéu, Madrid
RefereeGeorge Courtney (England)
Attendance85,000
Second leg
Date6 May 1986
VenueOlympiastadion, Berlin
RefereeBob Valentine (Scotland)
Attendance21,185
1985
1987

Route to the finalEdit

En route to reaching the final, both Real Madrid and FC Köln benefitted from performing extremely well at home. In the first five rounds of the competition, Los Blancos had won all five home legs, outscoring opponents by a total of 19 goals to 2 in games played at the Bernabéu in Madrid. Köln was also dominant in their home fixtures–– throughout the entire competition, the West German side conceded only one goal whilst playing as the home team.

In the third round, Real Madrid achieved a shocking comeback against two-time champions Borussia Mönchengladbach. After being crushed by Gladbach in the away leg by a score of 5–1, Real stormed back to win the return leg 4–0, thus advancing on away goals. This is still regarded as one of the greatest comebacks in the history of European continental football.[1]

This was also the second year in a row in which Real Madrid eliminated Inter Milan in the semi-finals of the UEFA Cup.

Real Madrid Round 1. FC Köln
Opponent Agg. 1st leg 2nd leg Opponent Agg. 1st leg 2nd leg
  AEK Athens 5–1 0–1 (A) 5–0 (H) First round   Sporting Gijón 2–1 0–0 (H) 2–1 (A)
  Chornomorets Odesa 2–1 2–1 (H) 0–0 (A) Second round   Bohemians Praha 8–2 4–0 (H) 4–2 (A)
  Borussia Mönchengladbach 5–5 (a) 1–5 (A) 4–0 (H) Third round   Hammarby 4–3 1–2 (A) 3–1 (H)
  Neuchâtel Xamax 3–2 3–0 (H) 0–2 (A) Quarter-finals   Sporting CP 3–1 1–1 (A) 2–0 (H)
  Internazionale 6–4 (a.e.t.) 1–3 (A) 5–1 (a.e.t.) (H) Semi-finals   K.S.V. Waregem 7–3 4–0 (H) 3–3 (A)

Match detailsEdit

First legEdit

Real Madrid  5–1  1. FC Köln
Sánchez   38'
Gordillo   42'
Valdano   51', 84'
Santillana   89'
Report
Overview (archive)
Allofs   29'
Attendance: 85,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Real Madrid[2]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Köln[2]
GK 1   Agustín
DF 4   José Antonio Salguero
DF 2   Jesús Solana
DF 3   José Antonio Camacho (c)
DF 7   Juanito
MF 10   Rafael Martín Vázquez   81'
MF 6   Rafael Gordillo
MF 5   Míchel
MF 11   Jorge Valdano
FW 8   Emilio Butragueño
FW 9   Hugo Sánchez
Substitutes:
FW 12   Santillana   81'
Manager:
  Luis Molowny
 
GK 1   Harald Schumacher
SW 4   Andreas Gielchen
DF 3   Karl-Heinz Geils
DF 5   Paul Steiner
DF 2   Dieter Prestin
MF 6   Ralf Geilenkirchen
MF 8   Mathias Hönerbach
MF 9   Uwe Bein   70'
MF 10   Olaf Janßen
FW 7   Pierre Littbarski   83'
FW 11   Klaus Allofs (c)
Substitutes:
MF   Thomas Häßler   70'
FW   Norbert Dickel   83'
Manager:
  Georg Keßler

Second legEdit

Scheduling changesEdit

The second leg was originally scheduled for Thursday, 8 May, but was moved to Tuesday, 6 May, following a request by Real Madrid due to their domestic fixtures. Additionally, the match was played in Berlin instead of Cologne because of sanctions imposed by UEFA on Köln stipulating that they must play at least 350 km from their home stadium after trouble caused by supporters during the 2nd leg of the semi-final against Waregem.[citation needed]

ResultEdit

Like Real Madrid had in the earlier stages of the competition, Köln went into the second leg 5–1 down. However, Die Geißböcke were unable to replicate Real's successful third-round comeback against Mönchengladbach. Though Köln won the match 2–0 at home, it wasn't enough, and Real were crowned champions for the second successive year.

 
 
 
 
 
Köln[3]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Real Madrid[3]
GK 1   Harald Schumacher
SW 4   Andreas Gielchen
DF 2   Dieter Prestin
DF 5   Paul Steiner
MF 3   Karl-Heinz Geils   83'
MF 6   Ralf Geilenkirchen
MF 8   Mathias Hönerbach
MF 9   Uwe Bein
MF 10   Olaf Janßen   58'
FW 7   Pierre Littbarski
FW 11   Klaus Allofs (c)
Substitutes:
DF   David Pizanti   58'
MF   Robert Schmitz   83'
Manager:
  Georg Keßler
 
GK 1   Agustín
DF 2   Chendo
DF 3   José Antonio Camacho (c)
DF 5   Jesús Solana
DF 4   Antonio Maceda
MF 11   Jorge Valdano
MF 10   Ricardo Gallego
MF 8   Míchel
MF 6   Rafael Gordillo
FW 7   Emilio Butragueño   20'
FW 9   Hugo Sánchez   88'
Substitutes:
FW 12   Santillana   20'
FW 14   Juanito   88'
Manager:
  Luis Molowny

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tighe, Sam (20 February 2014). "15 Greatest European Football Comebacks of All Time". bleacherreport.com. B/R Football. Retrieved 18 August 2020. 9. Real Madrid 5-5 Borussia Monchengladbach.
  2. ^ a b "Real Madrid – 1. FC Köln 5:1, UEFA-Cup, Saison 1985/86, 6.Spieltag – taktische Aufstellung". kicker.de (in German). kicker-sportmagazin. Retrieved 24 February 2018.
  3. ^ a b "1. FC Köln – Real Madrid 2:0, UEFA-Cup, Saison 1985/86, 6.Spieltag – taktische Aufstellung". kicker.de (in German). kicker-sportmagazin. Retrieved 24 February 2018.

External linksEdit