1983 Asturian regional election

The 1983 Asturian regional election was held on Sunday, 8 May 1983, to elect the 1st General Junta of the Principality of Asturias. All 45 seats in the General Junta were up for election. The election was held simultaneously with regional elections in twelve other autonomous communities and local elections all throughout Spain.

1983 Asturian regional election

8 May 1983 1987 →

All 45 seats in the General Junta of the Principality of Asturias
23 seats needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Registered873,690
Turnout568,271 (65.0%)
  First party Second party Third party
  Pedro Silva 1986 (cropped).jpg Francisco Álvarez-Cascos 1996 (cropped).jpg Portrait placeholder.svg
Leader Pedro de Silva Francisco Álvarez Cascos Francisco Javier Suárez
Party PSOE AP–PDP–PL PCE
Leader since 15 March 1983 1983 1983
Leader's seat Central Central Central
Seats won 26 14 5
Popular vote 293,320 170,654 62,855
Percentage 52.0% 30.2% 11.1%

AsturiasDistrictMapJunta1983.png
Constituency results map for the General Junta of the Principality of Asturias

President before election

Rafael Fernández
PSOE

Elected President

Pedro de Silva
PSOE

The Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) scored a landslide victory by securing a comfortable absolute majority of 26 out of 45 seats, with 52% of the vote. The People's Coalition, headed by the conservative People's Alliance and joined by the People's Democratic Party (PDP) and the Liberal Union (UL) became the second political force and the main opposition party in the General Junta with 14 seats and 30.2%. The Communist Party of Spain (PCE) obtained 5 seats and 11.1%, whereas the Democratic and Social Centre (CDS) was left as an extra-parliamentary party after failing to reach the 5% regional threshold.[1] The former ruling party of Spain, the Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD), had chosen to dissolve itself in February 1983 and did not contest the election as a result.[2]

After the election, Socialist Pedro de Silva replaced Rafael Fernández as president of the Principality of Asturias.[3] The election remains, together with 1999, the only occasion to date in which a party has obtained an absolute majority of seats on its own in an Asturian regional election.

OverviewEdit

Electoral systemEdit

The General Junta of the Principality of Asturias was the devolved, unicameral legislature of the autonomous community of Asturias, having legislative power in regional matters as defined by the Spanish Constitution of 1978 and the regional Statute of Autonomy, as well as the ability to vote confidence in or withdraw it from a regional president.[4]

Transitory Provision First of the Statute established a specific electoral procedure for the first election to the General Junta of the Principality of Asturias, to be supplemented by the provisions within Royal Decree-Law 20/1977, of 18 March, and its related regulations. Voting for the General Junta was on the basis of universal suffrage, which comprised all nationals over eighteen, registered in Asturias and in full enjoyment of their civil and political rights. The 45 members of the General Junta of the Principality of Asturias were elected using the D'Hondt method and a closed list proportional representation, with an electoral threshold of five percent of valid votes—which included blank ballots—being applied regionally. Seats were allocated to constituencies, which were established as follows:

Each constituency was allocated a fixed number of seats: 32 for the Central District, 5 for the Eastern District and 8 for the Western District.[4][5][6]

Election dateEdit

The Council of Government of the Principality of Asturias, in agreement with the Government of Spain, was required to call an election to the General Junta of the Principality of Asturias within from 1 February to 31 May 1983.[4] On 7 March 1983, it was confirmed that the first election to the General Junta of the Principality of Asturias would be held on Sunday, 8 May, together with regional elections for twelve other autonomous communities as well as nationwide local elections,[7][8][9] with the election decree being published in the Official Gazette of the Principality of Asturias and of the Province on 10 March.[6]

BackgroundEdit

The approval of a statute of autonomy for the Principality of Asturias was subject to the "slow-track" procedure set down under Article 143 of the Spanish Constitution of 1978. This route had been favoured by the governing party of Spain, the Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD), and more reluctantly by the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE), the Communist Party of Spain (PCE) and the People's Alliance (AP),[10][11] which had initially advocated for the "fast-track" route of Article 151;[12][13][14] the difference between both procedures being the pace in the process of devolution.[15]

Starting in October 1977, deputies and senators from the four parties having won parliamentary representation in Asturias at the 1977 Spanish general election—PSOE, UCD, AP and PCE—initiated procedures for requesting the central government a pre-autonomic regime for the region,[16][17] which was granted in 1978 through the establishment of a Regional Council with Socialist Rafael Fernández at its head and members from the aforementioned four political parties.[18][19][20] The autonomy Statute was finally approved in 1981 after the signing of the "autonomic pacts" between UCD and PSOE,[21][22][23] coming into force on 31 January 1982.[24][25]

The first regional government of the autonomous community came to be formed by a PSOE–PCE coalition in April 1982.[26][27][28] The investiture process to re-elect Rafael Fernández to the post had come under trouble over discrepancies on the government composition,[29][30][31] after the PSOE unsuccessfully attempted to invite all other parties into a national unity government or form a single-party government without the PCE until the celebration of the first regional election,[32][33] and with the PCE's refusal to support the PSOE candidate without entering the regional cabinet risking a political deadlock or a UCD–AP government in the region.[34][35][36] While as president, Fernández maintained a moderate profile aimed at broadening the PSOE's support ahead of the incoming 1982 and 1983 elections, with the Principality having become both an experiment on the Socialists's government capabilities at large as well as an electoral stronghold for the party.[37]

Parliamentary compositionEdit

The composition of the provisional General Junta was determined by the provisions of Transitory Provision Second of the Statute, which established that its members be indirectly elected as follows:[4][24][38]

  • a) the elected members for the region in the national Cortes Generales;
  • b) the provincial deputies who had been elected at the 1979 local elections; and
  • c) 14 appointed members, distributed among the political parties in accordance with their seat results—both deputies and senators—in the previous general election.

As a result, the composition of the provisional General Junta of the Principality of Asturias, upon its constitution in March 1982, was established as indicated below:[24][39]

Parliamentary composition in March 1982
Parties Cortes Generales Prov.
dep.
App. Seats
Dep. Sen. Total +/−
PSOE 4 3 10 7 24 n/a
UCD 4 1 14 5 24 n/a
PCA–PCE 1 0 5 1 7 n/a
AP 1 0 1 1 3 n/a
Total 10 4 30 14 58 n/a

The 1982 Spanish general election resulted in changes in the composition of the provisional regional assembly, in accordance with the new seat distribution of Cortes Generales members in the region.[40][41][42] Changes shown include former UCD provincial deputy Manuel Rodríguez Zapico leaving the UCD's parliamentary caucus and joining the Mixed Group as an independent on 23 March 1982.[43]

Parliamentary composition in November 1982
Parties Cortes Generales Prov.
dep.
App. Seats
Dep. Sen. Total +/−
PSOE 6 3 10 9 28 +4
UCD[a] 0 0 13 0 13 –11
AP–PDP 3 1 1 4 9 +6
PCA–PCE 1 0 5 1 7 ±0
INDEP 0 0 1 0 1 +1
Total 10 4 30 14 58 ±0

Parties and candidatesEdit

The electoral law allowed for parties and federations registered in the interior ministry, coalitions and groupings of electors to present lists of candidates. Parties and federations intending to form a coalition ahead of an election were required to inform the relevant Electoral Commission within fifteen days of the election call, whereas groupings of electors needed to secure the signature of at least one-thousandth of the electorate in the constituencies for which they sought election—with a compulsory minimum of 500 signatures—disallowing electors from signing for more than one list of candidates.[5] A minimum of three deputies was required for the constitution of parliamentary groups in the General Junta of the Principality of Asturias.[47]

Below is a list of the main parties and electoral alliances which contested the election:

Candidacy Parties and
alliances
Leading candidate Ideology Gov. Ref.
PSOE   Pedro de Silva Social democracy  Y [48]
[49]
AP–PDP–UL   Francisco Álvarez Cascos Conservatism
Christian democracy
 N [49]
PCA–PCE
List
  Francisco Javier Suárez Eurocommunism  Y [49]

The electoral disaster of the Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD) in the October 1982 general election and the outcome of its extraordinary congress held in December, in which the party's leadership chose to transform the UCD into a christian democratic political force,[50] brought the party to a process of virtual disintegration as many of its remaining members either switched party allegiances, split into new, independent candidacies or left politics altogether.[51][52] Subsequent attempts to seek electoral allies ahead of the incoming 1983 local and regional elections, mainly the conservative People's Alliance (AP) and the christian democratic People's Democratic Party (PDP),[53][54] had limited success due to concerns from both AP and UCD over such an alliance policy:[55][56] AP strongly rejected any agreement that implied any sort of global coalition with UCD due to the party's ongoing decomposition,[57][58] and prospects about a possible PDP–UCD merger did not come into fruition because of the latter's reluctance to dilute its brand within another party.[59][60][61] By the time the UCD's executive had voted for the liquidation of the party's mounting debts and its subsequent dissolution on 18 February 1983,[2][62][63] electoral alliances with the AP–PDP coalition had only been agreed in some provinces of the Basque Country and Galicia.[64][65][66]

Together with AP, the PDP had agreed to maintain their general election alliance—now rebranded as the People's Coalition—for the May local and regional elections,[67][68][69] with the inclusion of the Liberal Union (UL), a political party created in January 1983 out of independents from the AP–PDP coalition in an attempt to appeal to former UCD liberal voters.[70][66] The Coalition had seen its numbers soar from late February as a result of many former members from the UCD's christian democratic wing joining the PDP.[71][72][73]

The Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) chose not to field incumbent president Rafael Fernández as their leading candidate, after several clashes between Fernández and the party's regional leadership,[74] instead proposing Pedro de Silva, secretary general of the Socialist Parliamentary Group in the Congress of Deputies up until then, for the post of regional premier.[48]

Opinion pollsEdit

The tables below list opinion polling results in reverse chronological order, showing the most recent first and using the dates when the survey fieldwork was done, as opposed to the date of publication. Where the fieldwork dates are unknown, the date of publication is given instead. The highest percentage figure in each polling survey is displayed with its background shaded in the leading party's colour. If a tie ensues, this is applied to the figures with the highest percentages. The "Lead" column on the right shows the percentage-point difference between the parties with the highest percentages in a poll.

Voting intention estimatesEdit

The table below lists weighted voting intention estimates. Refusals are generally excluded from the party vote percentages, while question wording and the treatment of "don't know" responses and those not intending to vote may vary between polling organisations. When available, seat projections determined by the polling organisations are displayed below (or in place of) the percentages in a smaller font; 23 seats were required for an absolute majority in the General Junta of the Principality of Asturias.

Voting preferencesEdit

The table below lists raw, unweighted voting preferences.

ResultsEdit

OverallEdit

Summary of the 8 May 1983 General Junta of the Principality of Asturias election results
Parties and alliances Popular vote Seats
Votes % ±pp Total +/−
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 293,320 51.96 n/a 26 n/a
People's Coalition (APPDPUL) 170,654 30.23 n/a 14 n/a
Communist Party of Asturias (PCA–PCE) 62,855 11.13 n/a 5 n/a
Democratic and Social Centre (CDS) 19,495 3.45 n/a 0 n/a
Workers' Socialist Party (PST) 4,703 0.83 n/a 0 n/a
Communist Candidacy (PRUC–PCPE) 4,226 0.75 n/a 0 n/a
Asturian Left (MCLCR) 2,833 0.50 n/a 0 n/a
Asturian Nationalist Ensame (ENA) 2,505 0.44 n/a 0 n/a
Popular Struggle Coalition (CLP) 867 0.15 n/a 0 n/a
Youth Students and Workers (MEyT) 764 0.14 n/a 0 n/a
Blank ballots 2,298 0.41 n/a
Total 564,520 45 n/a
Valid votes 564,520 99.34 n/a
Invalid votes 3,751 0.66 n/a
Votes cast / turnout 568,271 65.04 n/a
Abstentions 305,419 34.96 n/a
Registered voters 873,690
Sources[75][76][77][78]
Popular vote
PSOE
51.96%
AP–PDP–UL
30.23%
PCE
11.13%
CDS
3.45%
Others
2.82%
Blank ballots
0.41%
Seats
PSOE
57.78%
AP–PDP–UL
31.11%
PCE
11.11%

Distribution by constituencyEdit

Constituency PSOE CP PCA
% S % S % S
Central 54.5 19 27.6 9 11.6 4
Eastern 43.8 3 42.3 2 8.3
Western 42.6 4 37.2 3 10.4 1
Total 52.0 26 30.2 14 11.1 5
Sources[75][76][77][78]

AftermathEdit

Under Article 32 of the Statute, investiture processes to elect the president of the Principality of Asturias required of an absolute majority—more than half the votes cast—to be obtained in the first ballot. If unsuccessful, new ballots would be held within 48-hour periods requiring only of a simple majority—more affirmative than negative votes—to succeed. In the event of the investiture process failing to elect a regional president within a two-month period from the first ballot, the General Junta was to be automatically dissolved and a fresh election called, with elected deputies merely serving out what remained of their four-year terms.[4]

On 17 June 1983, Pedro de Silva, the candidate proposed by the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE), was elected as new president of the Principality with an absolute majority of votes.[3]

Investiture
Pedro de Silva (PSOE)
Ballot → 17 June 1983
Required majority → 23 out of 45  Y
Yes
26 / 45
No
14 / 45
Abstentions
5 / 45
Absentees
0 / 45
Sources[3][78]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Two further UCD deputies would leave the party's parliamentary caucus and join the Mixed Group in December 1982, before the new chamber's composition led to the Speaker of the assembly, UCD's Agustín Antuña, to be replaced by PSOE member Eugenio Carvajal on 14 January 1983.[44][45][46]
  2. ^ a b c d Results for CD (1979) and AP–PDP (1982).

ReferencesEdit

Opinion poll sources
  1. ^ "Mayoría absoluta del PSOE en las dos elecciones". El País (in Spanish). 1 May 1983.
  2. ^ "Ficha técnica de los sondeos". El País (in Spanish). 1 May 1983.
  3. ^ "El PSOE puede lograr la mayoría simple en los trece parlamentos autonóminos nuevos, de acuerdo con los resultados del 28-O". El País (in Spanish). 21 February 1983.
  4. ^ "Preelectoral municipales y autonómicas 1983 (VII). Principado de Asturias (Estudio nº 1352. Abril 1983)" (PDF). CIS (in Spanish). 11 April 1983.
Other
  1. ^ "Pedro de Silva dirigirá la autonomía". El País (in Spanish). 10 May 1983. Retrieved 11 December 2019.
  2. ^ a b "La crisis de UCD culmina con la decisión de disolverse como partido político". El País (in Spanish). 19 February 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  3. ^ a b c "Pedro de Silva, elegido presidente del Gobierno regional asturiano". El País (in Spanish). 18 June 1983. Retrieved 11 December 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Ley Orgánica 7/1981, de 30 de diciembre, de Estatuto de Autonomía para Asturias". Organic Law No. 7 of 30 December 1981. Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  5. ^ a b "Real Decreto-ley 20/1977, de 18 de marzo, sobre Normas Electorales". Royal Decree-Law No. 20 of 18 March 1977. Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  6. ^ a b "Decreto 10/1983, de 4 de marzo, por el que se convocan elecciones a la Junta General del Principado de Asturias" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Principado de Asturias y de la Provincia (in Spanish) (57): 695–696. 10 March 1983. ISSN 1579-7252. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  7. ^ "Se confirma el 8 de mayo como la fecha de las elecciones locales". El País (in Spanish). 8 March 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  8. ^ "Hoy se hará oficial la convocatoria de elecciones locales para el 8 de mayo". El País (in Spanish). 9 March 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  9. ^ "Convocadas las elecciones locales y autonómicas para el domingo 8 de mayo". El País (in Spanish). 10 March 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  10. ^ "El acceso a la autonomía se hará según el artículo 143 de la Constitución". El País (in Spanish). 2 December 1979. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  11. ^ "Sinopsis del Estatuto de Asturias". congreso.es (in Spanish). Congress of Deputies. Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  12. ^ "La autonomía asturiana, en 1982". El País (in Spanish). 15 August 1979. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  13. ^ "UCD quiere autonomía escalonada en Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 5 September 1979. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  14. ^ "Responsabilizan a UCD de dilatar el acceso a la autonomía". El País (in Spanish). 23 October 1979. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  15. ^ "El acceso a la autonomía: la vía del artículo 143". El País (in Spanish). 17 January 1980. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  16. ^ "Los parlamentarios asturianos abordaron el tema de la autonomía". El País (in Spanish). 12 October 1977. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  17. ^ "Se aprueba el régimen preautonómico de Asturias y Murcia". El País (in Spanish). 26 August 1978. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  18. ^ "El texto preautonómico asturiano, fruto de un compromiso entre las distintas fuerzas políticas". El País (in Spanish). 27 August 1978. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  19. ^ "El socialista Rafael Fernández, presidente del Consejo Regional de Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 4 November 1978. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  20. ^ "Real Decreto-ley 29/1978, de 27 de septiembre, por el que se aprueba el régimen preautonómico para Asturias". Royal Decree-Law No. 29 of 27 September 1978. Boletín Oficial del Estado (in Spanish). Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  21. ^ "Acuerdo UCD-PSOE sobre el Estatuto de Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 25 June 1981. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  22. ^ "El Congreso aprueba el Estatuto de Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 2 October 1981. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  23. ^ "Aprobados los Estatutos de Asturias y Cantabria, los primeros tramitados por la vía del artículo 143". El País (in Spanish). 16 December 1981. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  24. ^ a b c "Asturias queda constituida hoy como comunidad autónoma". El País (in Spanish). 31 January 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  25. ^ "La España de las Autonomías. Asturias. Breve historia". El Mundo (in Spanish). June 2005. Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  26. ^ "El partido socialista obtiene la presidencia del Gobierno asturiano con el apoyo de los comunistas". El País (in Spanish). 16 April 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  27. ^ "Felipe González, contrario al Gobierno PSOE-PCE para Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 16 April 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  28. ^ "Rafael Fernández accede hoy a la presidencia del Gobierno autónomo". El País (in Spanish). 17 May 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  29. ^ "El empate en tres votaciones impidió la constitución del Parlamento regional asturiano". El País (in Spanish). 7 March 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  30. ^ "Suspendida la sesión de investidura del presidente autónomo del Principado". El País (in Spanish). 30 March 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  31. ^ "La elección del presidente del primer Gobierno autónomo de Asturias, en un callejón sin salida". El País (in Spanish). 31 March 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  32. ^ "Los socialistas prefieren un Gobierno de concentración a la alianza con los comunistas". El País (in Spanish). 6 February 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  33. ^ "UCD rechaza el gobierno de coalición propuesto por el PSOE". El País (in Spanish). 7 February 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  34. ^ "Agustín Antuña, de UCD, elegido presidente del Parlamento asturiano". El País (in Spanish). 9 March 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  35. ^ "El PCE asturiano rechaza la oferta del PSOE para el Gobierno regional". El País (in Spanish). 20 March 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  36. ^ "La oferta de los socialistas de dar una cartera a los comunistas posibilita un Gobierno de izquierdas en Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 14 April 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  37. ^ "Asturias, 'ensayo general' del socialismo". El País (in Spanish). 13 October 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  38. ^ "Un sector centrista se niega a formar parte del gobierno autónomo de Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 3 February 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  39. ^ "Elecciones a Diputaciones Provinciales (1979)". Historia Electoral.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  40. ^ "Inminentes cambios en las instituciones autonómicas del País Valenciano y Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 4 November 1982. Retrieved 12 December 2019.
  41. ^ "El presidente del Parlamento asturiano intenta forzar su cese". El País (in Spanish). 12 November 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  42. ^ "El PSOE relevará al presidente del Parlamento regional intenta forzar su cese". El País (in Spanish). 20 November 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  43. ^ "Un diputado regional abandona el grupo de UCD en la Asamblea de Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 24 March 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  44. ^ "El socialista Eugenio Carbajal será el futuro presidente del Parlamento asturiano". El País (in Spanish). 2 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  45. ^ "Modificado el reglamento del Parlamento asturiano para sustituir a su presidente". El País (in Spanish). 16 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  46. ^ "UCD pierde la presidencia de la Junta General de Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 14 January 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  47. ^ "Reglamento de la Junta General del Principado de Asturias" (PDF). Boletín Oficial del Principado de Asturias y de la Provincia (in Spanish) (6): 49–61. 10 January 1983. ISSN 1579-7252. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  48. ^ a b "Pedro de Silva sustituye a Rafael Fernández como candidato a presidente de Asturias". El País (in Spanish). 16 March 1983. Retrieved 12 December 2019.
  49. ^ a b c "Silva releva al veterano Rafael Fernández". El País (in Spanish). 16 April 1983. Retrieved 12 December 2019.
  50. ^ "Los democristianos ganan la batalla a los 'azules' en el congreso de UCD y mantienen a Lavilla en la presidencia". El País (in Spanish). 13 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  51. ^ "Ex ministros y 'notables' de UCD inician la fuga del partido". El País (in Spanish). 14 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  52. ^ "El proceso de desintegración de UCD se acelera con peticiones de bajas en numerosas regiones". El País (in Spanish). 16 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  53. ^ "Sigue en el aire la posibilidad de pacto electoral entre AP-UCD". El País (in Spanish). 21 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  54. ^ "UCD, a favor de seguir negociando con AP para llegar a un pacto de cara a las municipales". El País (in Spanish). 30 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  55. ^ "Fraga se muestra reticente sobre la conveniencia de llegar a un pacto electoral con UCD". El País (in Spanish). 18 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  56. ^ "División en UCD sobre la conveniencia de un pacto electoral con Alianza Popular". El País (in Spanish). 22 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  57. ^ "Aumentan los obstáculos para un acuerdo electoral entre UCD y AP". El País (in Spanish). 4 January 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  58. ^ "UCD negociará pactos locales para los próximos comicios". El País (in Spanish). 18 January 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  59. ^ "Lavilla desmiente su dimisión y asegura que "aun existen muchas incógnitas por decidir" en UCD". El País (in Spanish). 9 February 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  60. ^ "El mantenimiento de las siglas, máximo obstáculo para el acercamiento de UCD al Partido Demócrata Popular". El País (in Spanish). 17 February 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  61. ^ "La mayoría de los parlamentarios de UCD se opone a las negociaciones para una integración en el PDP". El País (in Spanish). 18 February 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  62. ^ "Exito y fracaso sin precedentes en la historia de las democracias". El País (in Spanish). 19 February 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  63. ^ "Disolución formal del partido centrista en Salamanca, donde llegó a tener 256 alcaldes". El País (in Spanish). 21 February 1983. Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  64. ^ "Acuerdo entre UCD y AP, para concurrir juntos, a las municipales en algunas provincias". El País (in Spanish). 8 January 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  65. ^ "UCD adoptará esta semana una decisión sobre las municipales". El País (in Spanish). 31 January 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  66. ^ a b "UCD y AP-PDP sólo irán en coalición a las municipales en el País Vasco". El País (in Spanish). 11 February 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  67. ^ "Formado un comité coordinador de los partidos coaligados con AP". El País (in Spanish). 3 March 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  68. ^ "El Partido Demócrata Popular considera "correctas, pero muy difíciles", las negociaciones con AP para las próximas elecciones". El País (in Spanish). 13 March 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  69. ^ "Formalizada la coalición AP-PDP-UL en todas las provincias". El País (in Spanish). 22 March 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  70. ^ "Dos nuevos grupos se unen a la 'operación liberal' de Fraga". El País (in Spanish). 19 January 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  71. ^ "El partido de Oscar Alzaga trata de forzar una próxima 'fuga' de militantes de UCD". El País (in Spanish). 8 February 1983. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  72. ^ "Centenares de militantes democristianos de UCD se integrarán hoy en el partido de Oscar Alzaga". El País (in Spanish). 20 February 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  73. ^ "19 dirigentes democristianos de UCD se integran en el consejo político del PDP". El País (in Spanish). 21 February 1983. Retrieved 13 December 2019.
  74. ^ "El PSOE se cuestiona la continuidad de Rafael Fernández al frente del Gobierno asturiano". El País (in Spanish). 1 December 1982. Retrieved 14 December 2019.
  75. ^ a b "General Junta of the Principality of Asturias election results, 8 May 1983". www.juntaelectoralcentral.es (in Spanish). Electoral Commission of Asturias. 7 June 1983. Archived from the original on 8 December 2019. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  76. ^ a b "Electoral Results. General Junta of the Principality of Asturias. 1st Legislature (1983–1987)". www.jgpa.es (in Spanish). General Junta of the Principality of Asturias. Retrieved 29 November 2019.
  77. ^ a b "Electoral Results. 1983". www.sadei.es (in Spanish). SADEI. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  78. ^ a b c "Elecciones a la Junta General del Principado de Asturias (1983 - 2019)". Historia Electoral.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 September 2017.