1979 Swedish general election

General elections were held in Sweden on 16 September 1979.[1] Although the Swedish Social Democratic Party remained the largest party, winning 154 of the 349 seats in the Riksdag,[2] the liberal interim government of Ola Ullsten was succeeded by another centre-right coalition government composed of the People's Party, the Moderate Party and the Centre Party, led by Centre Party leader Thorbjörn Fälldin. The three parties together won 175 seats, compared to the 174 won by the Social Democrats and Communists. It was the only time that non-socialist parties retained power in an election between 1928 and 2010. The Moderates dramatically increased their representation in the Riksdag, becoming the largest party of the non-socialist bloc, a position they maintained until 2022.

1979 Swedish general election

← 1976 16 September 1979 1982 →

All 349 seats in the Riksdag
175 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Olof Palme 1974 (cropped).jpg Gösta Bohman (1967).jpg Falldin.JPG
Leader Olof Palme Gösta Bohman Thorbjörn Fälldin
Party Social Democrats Moderate Centre
Last election 152 55 86
Seats won 154 73 64
Seat change Increase2 Increase18 Decrease22
Popular vote 2,356,234 1,108,406 984,589
Percentage 43.24% 20.34% 18.07%

  Fourth party Fifth party
  Ola Ullsten.JPG Bundesarchiv Bild 183-N0701-023, Berlin, Erich Honecker, Lars Werner cropped.jpg
Leader Ola Ullsten Lars Werner
Party People's Party Left Communists
Last election 39 17
Seats won 38 20
Seat change Decrease1 Increase3
Popular vote 577,063 305,420
Percentage 10.59% 5.61%

Riksdagsvalet 1979.svg
Map of the election, showing the distribution of constituency and levelling seats, as well as the largest political bloc within each constituency.

PM before election

Ola Ullsten
People's Party

Elected PM

Thorbjörn Fälldin
Centre

Despite the unexpected victory, the coalition split in 1981 when the Moderates withdrew support in protest at Fälldin's tax policies, which they viewed as "too leftist". Despite not being the leader of the coalition party with the most seats, Fälldin had been the designate Prime Minister since his earlier resignation in 1978, upon disagreement over the question of nuclear power.

ResultsEdit

 
PartyVotes%Seats+/–
Swedish Social Democratic Party2,356,23443.24154+2
Moderate Party1,108,40620.3473+18
Centre Party984,58918.0764–22
People's Party577,06310.5938–1
Left Party Communists305,4205.6120+3
Christian Democratic Unity75,9931.3900
Communist Party10,8620.2000
Workers Party Communists10,7250.200New
Other parties19,3460.3600
Total5,448,638100.003490
Valid votes5,448,63899.43
Invalid/blank votes31,4880.57
Total votes5,480,126100.00
Registered voters/turnout6,040,46190.72
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

Seat distributionEdit

Constituency Total
seats
Seats won
By party By coalition
S M C F V Right Left
Älvsborg North 9 4 2 2 1 5 4
Älvsborg South 8 3 2 2 1 5 3
Blekinge 6 3 1 1 1 3 3
Bohus 11 4 3 2 2 7 4
Fyrstadskretsen 21 9 6 2 3 1 11 10
Gävleborg 13 7 1 3 1 1 5 8
Gothenburg 19 7 5 2 3 2 10 9
Gotland 2 1 1 1 1
Halland 10 4 2 3 1 6 4
Jämtland 5 3 2 2 3
Jönköping 13 5 3 3 2 8 5
Kalmar 10 5 2 2 1 5 5
Kopparberg 13 6 2 3 1 1 6 7
Kristianstad 11 5 3 2 1 6 5
Kronoberg 7 3 2 2 4 3
Malmöhus 11 5 3 2 1 6 5
Norrbotten 11 6 1 2 1 1 4 7
Örebro 12 6 2 2 1 1 5 7
Östergötland 17 8 3 3 2 1 8 9
Skaraborg 10 4 2 3 1 6 4
Södermanland 11 6 2 2 1 5 6
Stockholm County 33 13 9 4 4 3 17 16
Stockholm Municipality 31 11 9 3 4 4 16 15
Uppsala 10 4 2 2 1 1 5 5
Värmland 12 6 2 2 1 1 5 7
Västerbotten 10 5 1 2 1 1 4 6
Västernorrland 12 6 1 3 1 1 5 7
Västmanland 11 5 2 2 1 1 5 6
Total 349 154 73 64 38 20 175 174
Source: [1]

By municipalityEdit


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1858 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1873