1977 in British television

This is a list of British television related events from 1977.

List of years in British television (table)
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Events

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January

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February

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March

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April

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  • 7 April – BBC1 begins showing a new series of the American cartoon The Scooby-Doo Show, following several years of repeating older episodes.
  • 22 April – The original series of motoring programme Top Gear begins as a local magazine format produced by (and shown only by) BBC Midlands from its Pebble Mill Studios in Birmingham, presented by Angela Rippon and Tom Coyne. In 1978, it is offered to BBC2 where it airs until 2001. In 2002, the series is relaunched in a new format.

June

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July

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  • 2 July – BBC2 launch a new season of Saturday evening horror movie double bills with Dracula, Frankenstein - and Friends!
  • 7 July – The first episode of the BBC documentary series Brass Tacks is aired, featuring a debate as to whether Myra Hindley should be considered for parole from the life sentence she received for her role in the Moors murders in 1966.

August

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  • No events.

September

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October

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  • 1 October – Ian Trethowan succeeds Charles Curran as Director-General of the BBC.
  • 17 October – BBC1 launch the long-running variety and chat show Des O'Connor Tonight.
  • 19 October – The first edition of a new weekly magazine programme for Asian women, Gharbar, is broadcast. The programme had only been intended to run for 26 weeks but continues for around 500 weeks, finally ending in April 1987.[6]
  • 21 October – The World Administrative Radio Conference assigns five high-powered direct broadcast by satellite channels for domestic use in the UK.[7]

November

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December

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Undated

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Debuts

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BBC1

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BBC2

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Returning after a break of a year or longer

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Continuing television shows

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1920s

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  • BBC Wimbledon (1927–1939, 1946–2019, 2021–present)

1930s

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  • Trooping the Colour (1937–1939, 1946–2019, 2023–present)
  • The Boat Race (1938–1939, 1946–2019, 2021–present)
  • BBC Cricket (1939, 1946–1999, 2020–2024)

1940s

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1950s

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1960s

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1970s

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Ending this year

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Births

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Deaths

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See also

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References

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  1. ^ "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory – BBC One London – 1 January 1977 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  2. ^ Annan Committee (1977). Report of the Committee on the Future of Broadcasting. HMSO.
  3. ^ a b "James Bond On TV – Movies". MI6 – The Home Of James Bond 007. 5 April 2011. Retrieved 26 January 2018.
  4. ^ Hastings, David (1 September 2001). "A good breakfast". Inside TV. Archived from the original on 2010-02-13. Retrieved 1 August 2010.
  5. ^ "Yorkshire Television News". TV Ark. Archived from the original on 2012-02-19. Retrieved 1 August 2010.
  6. ^ "BBC Two England – 19 October 1977 – BBC Genome". genome.ch.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 14 November 2018.
  7. ^ Kassim, Hussein. The European Union and National Industrial Policy. p. 208.
  8. ^ a b "Laugh Lines: from Dad's Army to Hippies". The Guardian. 18 March 2010. Retrieved 11 February 2022.
  9. ^ Roberts, Laura (2010-12-01). "Mike Yarwood's 1977 Christmas Show tops the list of 10 most-watched Christmas programmes". Telegraph. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  10. ^ Joe Moran. "Christmas TV: five key moments | Television & radio". The Guardian. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  11. ^ archivetvmusings (2014-12-20). "The Morecambe and Wise Christmas Show 1977 | Archive Television Musings". Archivetvmusings.wordpress.com. Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  12. ^ The Guinness Book of Records.
  13. ^ "Eric and Ern – The Morecambe & Wise Show: Series 8". Morecambeandwise.com. Retrieved 2011-08-24.
  14. ^ "Ernie Wise". The Daily Telegraph. 22 March 1999. Archived from the original on 25 March 2010. Retrieved 2011-08-24.
  15. ^ Barfe, Louis (22 November 2008). "How John Sergeant revived did-you-see TV". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2011-08-24.
  16. ^ Bushby, Helen (30 December 2010). "Victoria Wood tells all about Eric and Ernie". BBC News. Retrieved 2011-08-24.
  17. ^ ITV and the BFI quote a figure of 21.3 million. "Features | Britain's Most Watched TV | 1970s". BFI. 4 September 2006. Archived from the original on 22 November 2005. Retrieved 2012-04-28.
  18. ^ Moran, Joe (22 March 2011). "One nation Christmas television". The Guardian. Retrieved 2011-08-24.
  19. ^ "Bruce's Choice – BBC One London – 31 December 1977". BBC Genome. BBC. Retrieved 18 August 2017.
  20. ^ Radio Times listing - 27 July 1991
  21. ^ "What the Papers Say in pictures". The Guardian. 29 May 2008. Retrieved 2 April 2022.
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