1977 (Ash album)

1977 is the debut studio album by Northern Irish rock band Ash. It was released on 6 May 1996 by Infectious Records, with whom the band had signed following the release of several demo tapes. Ash released the mini-album Trailer in 1994, and followed it with three singles "Kung Fu", "Girl from Mars", and "Angel Interceptor", all of which would reappear on 1977. Ash recorded their debut album with producer Owen Morris at Rockfield Studios in Wales in early 1996. Described as a Britpop and garage rock album, 1977 drew comparisons to the Buzzcocks, Dinosaur Jr., and Sonic Youth.

1977
A mirrored image of a street with rubbish bags and pot holes
Studio album by
Released6 May 1996
RecordedJanuary–March 1996
StudioRockfield
Genre
Length61:52
LabelInfectious
Producer
Ash chronology
Trailer
(1994)
1977
(1996)
Nu-Clear Sounds
(1998)
Singles from 1977
  1. "Kung Fu"
    Released: 20 March 1995
  2. "Girl from Mars"
    Released: 31 July 1995
  3. "Angel Interceptor"
    Released: 9 October 1995
  4. "Goldfinger"
    Released: 15 April 1996
  5. "Oh Yeah"
    Released: 24 June 1996

Preceded by the album's fourth single "Goldfinger" in April 1996, the band embarked on tours of the United Kingdom and Europe. "Oh Yeah" was released as the fifth single in June 1996, followed by tours of the United States, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand. Ash ended the year with another US tour, as well as a US support slot for Weezer. They toured Europe and the UK, before their appearance at Glastonbury Festival.

1977 received generally positive reviews from music critics, who praised the album's "catchy" nature. The album peaked at number one in the UK, as well as reaching the top 40 in Australia, Finland, New Zealand, Norway, and Switzerland. "Kung Fu", "Girl from Mars", "Angel Interceptor", "Goldfinger", and "Oh Yeah" all charted on the UK Singles Chart, with "Goldfinger" reaching the highest position at number five. 1977 appeared on several UK publications' best-of-the-year album lists, by the likes of Kerrang!, NME, and Melody Maker, among others. The album would later be certified platinum in the UK.

BackgroundEdit

In December 1989, schoolfriends Tim Wheeler and Mark Hamilton received instruments for Christmas, and decided to form a metal act they called Vietnam.[1][2] The rest of the line-up consisted of vocalist Gareth Hutchinson, guitarist Malcolm King, and drummer Andy McLean, who would all leave by early 1992 citing a lack of interest in the band.[3] After seeing a show by a local act, Laser Gun Nun, Wheeler and Hamilton decided to move their sound away from metal and into Nirvana-leaning territory.[4] Around this time, Wheeler was discovering the likes of ABBA and Paul McCartney and Wings.[5] Vietnam ultimately disbanded, and Wheeler and Hamilton decided to form a punk band. Wheeler handled vocals and guitar, Hamilton the bass. They spent two weeks amassing original material in Wheeler's bedroom.[6]

Drummer Rick McMurray joined the pair in June 1992;[2] Wheeler had approached him during a school play, and invited him to his house for a jam session.[7] With the line-up finalised, they christened themselves Ash after spotting the word in a dictionary.[8] Over the course of a year, the band recorded four demos tapes: Solar Happy in June 1992, Shed in September, Home Demo in November, and Garage Girl in February 1993.[9] A friend of the band had sent one of the demos to Paddy Davis of the public relations company, Bad Moon. He played it for four months, before passing it to Steve Tavener, who had plans to start a record label. Tavener and Davis subsequently went to Belfast to watch the band perform.[10]

Ash released their debut single, "Jack Names the Planets", through Tavener's La La Land Records in February 1994, by which point he had become their manager.[2][10] In April 1994, the band travelled to London to promote it. Several major labels approached them, before they signed with Infectious Records.[2][10] Two more singles, "Petrol" and "Uncle Pat", preceded the release of the band's mini-album Trailer in October 1994.[2][11] During this period, two-thirds of the band were focusing on their A-Levels, touring with Babes in Toyland and Elastica during their half-term holidays.[10] In February 1995, Wheeler and McMurray flew to the United States to meet with potential labels including Reprise and Interscope Records.[12][13] "Kung Fu" was released as a single on 20 March 1995, followed by "Girl from Mars" on 31 July 1995, and "Angel Interceptor" on 9 October 1995.[11]

Composition and lyricsEdit

Musically, the sound of 1977 has been described as Britpop,[14] and garage rock,[15] with elements of power pop, glam rock and grunge,[16] drawing comparisons to the Buzzcocks,[17] Dinosaur Jr., and Sonic Youth.[18] Wheeler attributed the range of styles to the band's American label, Reprise Records, having sent him several CDs from their back catalogue.[19] The album's title refers to the release year of Star Wars (1977), the year punk rock went mainstream, and the year Wheeler and Hamilton were born.[17][18] They had spent two months coming up with random titles, until Morris asked what it was going to be called, and the band replied 1977.[19] Wheeler wrote all of the tracks, except for "Lose Control" (which he co-wrote with Hamilton) and "Angel Interceptor" (co-written with McMurray). Nick Ingman, Morris and Wheeler came up with string arrangements.[20] The album features a sample of a TIE fighter from Star Wars; Wheeler was unsure if the band got permission for it, but theorised the label was fine with it as they were owned by 20th Century Fox which had made Star Wars.[21]

The opening track "Lose Control" is a punk rock song that utilises a quiet-and-loud dynamic.[22] According to the band, the song was meant to be a "proper punch in the face", which they achieved.[23] "Goldfinger" channels the sound of Teenage Fanclub.[18] When they began writing it, the band borrowed an instrumental break section from what they believed was "Goldfinger" (1964) sung by Shirley Bassey, but turned out to be a song by John Barrie.[24][25] Subsequent sections of the song were written around the world while touring to support Trailer.[26] Wheeler said they kept the name "Goldfinger" as "it has a lot of mystery".[24] "Girl from Mars" opens with an acoustic guitar intro, before erupting into a wall of guitars, reminiscent of Dinosaur Jr. member J Mascis.[18][27] A family holiday in France, where Wheeler smoked and drank with some people on a beach, influenced the track's chorus section.[28] The song was written around the time of Trailer but not included on it as their manager and label thought it would not be good for the band to have a hit single while still attending school.[21]

"I'd Give You Anything" is a harder, Stooges-esque track.[22][18] It was the last track Wheeler had written while living at his parents' home. Initially uptempo, Morris suggested the band slow it down.[29][30] The band made two versions of "Gone the Dream". The final version ended up as an indie rock song that featured a string section and reminiscent of the Boo Radleys, while the other version was a Beatles-esque track made at Morris' insistence.[31] "Kung Fu" is a tribute to Jackie Chan in the vein of the Ramones.[18] Wheeler wrote it at home in three minutes before leaving to record with Morris.[32] Wheeler claimed that he binge-listened to the Ramones over the Christmas period, while discovering the words "kung fu", "Hong Kong", and "fu manchu".[33] "Oh Yeah" is a nostalgic track about teenage romance, and features extra vocals by Lisa Moorish.[20][27] Wheeler wrote it when he was 18 about his first romance at 15, when he experienced those emotions for the first time.[34]

"Let It Flow" was written in the studio, and originally featured an intro before the chorus section, which was later dropped.[35][36] The song's original lyrics were scrapped, and re-written by Wheeler while the rest of the band were at a pub.[37] "Innocent Smile" was about "small town Ireland hoodlums", and is indebted to Daydream Nation (1988)-era Sonic Youth with its slow build-up.[22][38][39] "Angel Interceptor" is a mix of punk rock and doo-wop.[40] At the end, McMurray can be heard yelling "Whooo! Yeah, we’ve got it!", while he was on his first ecstasy trip.[7] "Lost in You" was by influenced by the Beach Boys, and written at the end of the recording process.[19] Wheeler wrote "Darkside Lightside" from the perspective of someone who had sex with another person's girlfriend; it opened with Iron Maiden-like riffs, and ended with guitar work reminiscent of Pink Floyd.[41] The hidden track "Sick Party" consists of Hamilton and guitar tech Leif Bodnarchuk vomiting.[19] It was planned initially to be part of the outtake "The Scream", which according to Wheeler was "built up [from] 48 tracks that started out like a murmur up to full on screaming".[42] When it came time to mix the song, they were "too scared". Because the band felt "Sick Party" "turned out to be so funny", it became a standalone track.[42]


Recording and productionEdit

Ash worked on pre-production with producer Owen Morris in December 1995; they began recording their debut album on New Year's Day 1996, commencing with "Goldfinger".[10][43][44] Sessions were held at Rockfield Studios in Wales, with Morris and the band co-producing the album.[20] Though the process was planned to take only six weeks, it ended up lasting three months.[19][45] Because they had toured incessantly since leaving school, the band did not have enough time to accumulate material for an album.[24] Wheeler wrote nearly half of what would end up on the finished album in the studio.[19]

As Rockfield was a residential studio, according to Wheeler, the members became "very nocturnal and very crazy". He attributed this to Morris "gradually introducing us to drugs, so we were off our heads a lot of the time".[42] Nick Brine, Sorrel Merchant and Neil Kiely acted as studio assistants.[20] Morris later mixed the recordings at Orinoco in London, except for "Girl from Mars" (Phil Thornalley) and "Angel Interceptor" (Mark "Spike" Stent).[20] Thornalley mixed "Girl on Mars" as the band's label and manager felt the track was incomplete.[7]

ReleaseEdit

"Goldfinger" was released as the fourth single from 1977 on 15 April 1996, with "I Need Somebody", "Sneaker", and a cover of the Smokey Robinson track "Get Ready" as extra tracks.[11] In May, Ash went on a United Kingdom tour with 60ft Dolls, Bis, and Jocasta.[46] Infectious released 1977 in the UK on 6 May, while the US release by Reprise appeared on 11 June 1996. The first 50,000 copies of the UK version included "Jack Names the Planets" and "Don't Know" as hidden tracks.[11] Ed van der Elsken took the cover photograph; clearing the rights for the image nearly delayed the album's release as he had died, and the band were unable to contact his widow.[20][47] Following this, the band embarked on a European tour, and appeared on Later... with Jools Holland.[46]

"Oh Yeah" was released as the album's fifth single on 24 June 1996, with "T. Rex", "Everywhere Is All Around", and the ABBA cover "Does Your Mother Know" as extra tracks.[11] The "Oh Yeah" music video sees Hamilton making out with an actress, interspersed with footage of the band performing at a carnival.[48] In July and August 1996, the band toured the US with Muzzle and performed at the Reading Festival.[46] Around this time, their label discussed releasing "Lost in You" as a single; however, the band felt they had released enough tracks from it by this point.[49] In September and October 1996, Ash toured Japan, Australia, and New Zealand, before returning to the US with Stabbing Westward in October and November.[46]

During the US leg of the tour, Ash met with the head programmer at MTV, to discuss getting coverage on the channel, however, Wheeler turned up late and drunk. The following day, the band had an interview on the channel; Wheeler arrived late again and vomited during it. The band's label was angry with them, and Wheeler later theorised that these incidents cost the band any major success in the US.[50] Ash supported Weezer on their US headlining tour through to December, before returning to Ireland for a one-off show to close the year.[46]

Ash released their first live album, Live at the Wireless, in February 1997. Recorded in Australia, it was sold in the UK and Europe.[11] In the same month, the band embarked on a European tour with 60 ft Dolls and Seesaw, leading up to five consecutive shows at the London Astoria.[51] Fan club members attending the Astoria shows were given a free 7" vinyl, which consisted of "I Only Want to Be with You", "Devil's Haircut", and a live version of "Kung Fu".[11] In June 1997, the band played a handful of UK shows with Silver Sun, before appearing at Glastonbury Festival.[51]

"Goldfinger", "Girl from Mars", "Kung Fu", "Oh Yeah" and "Angel Interceptor" were included on the band's three compilation albums, Intergalactic Sonic 7″s (2003), The Best of Ash (2011), and Teenage Wildlife: 25 Years of Ash (2020), and released on 7" vinyl as part of 94–'04 The 7" Singles Box Set (2014).[52] In 2008, a three-disc deluxe edition of 1977 was released, featuring Trailer, Live at the Wireless, B-sides, unreleased demos and live recordings.[20] BMG reissued it on CD in 2018.[53] The band have played the album in its entirety on several tours throughout 2008, 2013 and 2016.[15][54][55] Recordings from the Astoria shows were later compiled, and released as the live album Live on Mars – London Astoria 1997 (2016).[56]

Critical receptionEdit

Original release
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic     [16]
Alternative Press3/5[57]
The Guardian     [58]
NME7/10[38]
The Philadelphia Inquirer    [59]
Q     [60]

1977 was met with generally positive reviews from music critics. AllMusic reviewer Stephen Thomas Erlewine said that, by "sticking to the rigid rules of American punk-pop", Ash opted for a "cinematic approach to their songs", resulting in 1977 being a "melting pot of pop styles". He added their use of "loud guitars" offers a "distinctive, melodic, and energetic sound that's equal parts heavy grunge and light pop".[16] Ox-Fanzine's Joachim Hiller wrote that if the listener was "the missing link between Oasis and Elastica, [they] should find it here," adding that the band's "mixture of girl seductive sugar pop and evil grater guitars with seventies rock quotes" is everywhere, and is "very catchy and somehow as tasty as French fries".[61] Mark Jenkins of The Washington Post wrote that if he were to "judge only from the guitar squall" opening the album, it would appear that "the band prefers noise to melody" as previously shown on Trailer; however, he felt the "balance has shifted on this disc", with it showcasing "classic tunefulness over raw aggression".[40]

Q reviewer Andrew Collins said the album "benefits from having its raw power harnessed" by Morris and was "pulled off with 100 per cent enthusiasm; hey, these boys make pointless distorted introductions [to some songs] sound like fun."[60] NME's Johnny Cigarettes wrote that with "a single listen", he was certain the band had "cured themselves" of becoming generic, as he had noted with their early singles. He added that "[w]hat invariably saves them from mature-rock-band hell, just as it has saved them from generic-indie-band hell are those simple, honest, priceless standbys - top-hole tunes".[38] MTV writer Michael Krugman said that the album saw the band "teetering on the brink of maturity--only they're plainly fighting it by throwing their weight in the other direction". He mentions the album "occasionally trips over its own giant steps", noting a couple of generic and underdeveloped tracks, before citing the album's "real flaw...lies in the hands of someone who should have known better", criticising Morris' "excessively noisy and often quite murky" production, stating the "punk rock gets muddied, while experimental bits...are strangely obscured".[18]

Retrospective reviewsEdit

Retrospective reviews
Review scores
SourceRating
BBC MusicFavourable[62]
Drowned in Sound8/10[22]
The Irish Times     [17]
Mojo     [63]
Record CollectorUnfavourable[14]
Spectrum CultureFavourable[64]

Drowned in Sound reviewer Joss Albert called 1977 an "album by the young for the young". He said that while it wasn't "perfect or complete, the severe hooks of the best of the Brut smothered tunes will always get 1977's name mentioned".[22] Spectrum Culture contributor John L. Murphy noted that in spite of the "clear influences and the passage of time, 1977 still sounds fresh", with "fast pop dominat[ing]" after the initial listen. Only "repeated airings reveal craft in softer songs", their "cinematic" scope, and "sentimental" lyrics.[64] BBC Music's Mike Diver wrote that the album was likely "remembered by those who shared in its sentiments – written by a trio of teenagers, for an audience of the same, it preoccupied itself with chugging alcohol, chasing after girls and messing about with martial arts".[62]

The Irish Times writer Brian Boyd said the band "come racing out of the traps with a giddy pop sound", though he was "not sure why the band feel the need to release [a triple disc edition] ... as this will surely only appeal to their fanbase. But maybe's that the point."[17] Record Collector reviewer Emmy Watts described the album as a "grungy slice of Britpop" that "has not aged well". She noted that at the time, the "rough spontaneity" of Wheeler's "flat vocals" and McMurray's "muffled drumming" aided their inexperience, however, "the original format just highlights the recording's poor quality".[14] "Sick Party" was included on Pitchfork's 2010 list of "ten unusual CD-era gimmicks".[65]

Commercial performance and accoladesEdit

1977 peaked at number one in the UK,[66] selling 122,000 copies in its first week of release.[67] It also reached number five in Scotland,[68] number 14 in New Zealand,[69] number 18 in Australia,[70] number 26 in Finland and Norway,[71][72] number 40 in Switzerland,[73] number 44 in Sweden,[74] number 65 in Germany,[75] and number 75 in the Netherlands.[76] The album was certified platinum by the British Phonographic Industry in the UK.[77]

"Kung Fu" charted at number 57 in the UK.[78] "Girl from Mars" charted at number 11 in the UK.[78] "Angel Interceptor" charted at number 14 in the UK,[78] and "Goldfinger" charted at number five in the UK,[78] and number 50 in Australia.[79] "Oh Yeah" charted at number six in the UK.[78]

Several UK music magazines placed the album on their end-of-year lists for 1996, including Vox, NME, Melody Maker, Q, Select and Kerrang!. In 2010, Classic Rock magazine ranked the album at number one on its list of the 150 Greatest Debut Albums Ever.[80] It is also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[81] It is ranked at 417 on the NME poll of the 500 greatest albums of all time.[82]

Accolades for 1977
Publication List Rank Ref.
Alternative Press Best punk albums of 1996 N/A
Robert Dimery
Michael Lydon
1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die N/A
Hot Press The 250 Greatest Irish Albums of All Time 9
Kerrang! Albums of the Year 5
Melody Maker Albums of the Year 24
NME Albums of the Year 25
NME The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time 417
Select Albums of the Year 3
Q Albums of the Year N/A

Track listingEdit

Writing credits per booklet. All recordings produced by Owen Morris and Ash.[20]

No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Lose Control"
3:37
2."Goldfinger"Wheeler4:31
3."Girl from Mars"Wheeler3:30
4."I'd Give You Anything"Wheeler4:31
5."Gone the Dream"Wheeler3:29
6."Kung Fu"Wheeler2:17
7."Oh Yeah"Wheeler4:45
8."Let It Flow"Wheeler4:42
9."Innocent Smile"Wheeler5:52
10."Angel Interceptor"
  • Wheeler
  • Rick McMurray
4:04
11."Lost in You"Wheeler4:19
12."Darkside Lightside" (includes hidden track "Sick Party"; not on all versions)Wheeler16:49
Total length:61:52

PersonnelEdit

Personnel per booklet.[20]

Charts and certificationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Citations

  1. ^ Wilson, MacKenzie. "Ash Biography & History". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 11 November 2020. Retrieved 9 November 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Ash (1)". NME. Archived from the original on 12 June 2002. Retrieved 14 November 2020.
  3. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, pp. 16, 18
  4. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, p. 21
  5. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, p. 22
  6. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, p. 24
  7. ^ a b c Simpson, Dave (9 March 2020). "Ash: how we made Girl from Mars". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 30 October 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  8. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, p. 25
  9. ^ Citations regarding demo tapes:
    • Solar Happy (sleeve). Ash. Self-released. 1992.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
    • Shed (sleeve). Ash. Self-released. 1992.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
    • Home Demo (sleeve). Ash. Self-released. 1992.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
    • Garage Girl (sleeve). Ash. Self-released. 1993.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  10. ^ a b c d e "Ash - Mature Beyond Their Years". Dotmusic. 18 March 1996. Archived from the original on 2 January 2004. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g "Ash Discography". Ash. Archived from the original on 3 March 2000. Retrieved 14 November 2020.
  12. ^ "Kun Fu 20th Anniversary". Ash. 16 March 2015. Archived from the original on 27 June 2016. Retrieved 20 November 2020.
  13. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, p. 84
  14. ^ a b c Watts, Emmy (19 November 2008). "Ash 1977: Collector's Edition". Record Collector. Archived from the original on 28 August 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  15. ^ a b Sullivan, Caroline (8 September 2008). "Ash". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 8 August 2016. Retrieved 26 May 2016.
  16. ^ a b c Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "1977 - Ash | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 15 November 2020. Retrieved 21 January 2017.
  17. ^ a b c d Boyd, Brian (31 October 2008). "Ash: 1977 Collector's Edition/Remastered". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g Krugman, Michael. "Ash 1977". MTV. Archived from the original on 15 October 1997. Retrieved 14 November 2020.
  19. ^ a b c d e f Lindsay, Cam (20 September 2016). "Teen Sweat and Puke, Drugs and Dressing in Drag: How Ash Wrote Their Debut LP 1977". Vice Media. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i 1977 Deluxe Edition (booklet). Ash. Infectious Records. 2008. 5186 50450 5.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  21. ^ a b Lindsay, Cam (22 May 2015). "Rank Your Records: Tim Wheeler Ranks Ash's Eight Albums". Vice. Archived from the original on 8 November 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  22. ^ a b c d e Albert, Joss (21 April 2001). "Album Review: Ash – 1977". Drowned in Sound. Archived from the original on 28 August 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  23. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'We knew we wanted the opener to be a proper punch...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  24. ^ a b c Kay, George (October 1996). "Wheeler's on Fire". Rip It Up: 10.
  25. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'Turned out to be a different John Barrie song...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  26. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'It was a pretty stressful time which was...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  27. ^ a b Ward, Ed (4 November 1998). "Ash Use the Force Against the Evil Lo-Fi". MTV. Archived from the original on 16 November 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  28. ^ Yates, Henry (30 October 2016). "The Story Behind The Song: Girl From Mars by Ash". Louder. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  29. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'I'd Give You Anything. I remember this song being...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  30. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'Massive Stooges influence on this one obviously!...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  31. ^ Citations regarding "Gone the Dream":
  32. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'Kung Fu. The song that was almost a B-side! This was...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  33. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, p. 90
  34. ^ "Ash's Tim Wheeler on being called a legend, the anguish of watching his father's battle with Alzheimer's and why he'd like to be a dad himself one day". Belfast Telegraph. 24 November 2016. Archived from the original on 25 November 2016. Retrieved 21 November 2020.
  35. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'Let It Flow. Did I mention that we were still writing...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  36. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'Clicking out a whole chorus intro on guitar that...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  37. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'The original lyrics to this were ditched and Tim...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  38. ^ a b c Cigarettes, Johnny (4 May 1996). "Ash 1977". NME. Archived from the original on 17 August 2000. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  39. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'Innocent Smile. I was a Teenage Vandal. Mark's ode to small...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  40. ^ a b Jenkins, Mark (19 July 1996). "Ash: 1977". The Washington Post: 10.
  41. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, pp. 118–9
  42. ^ a b c Johnston, Emma (8 November 2008). "Treasure Chest. The Intimate Portrait of a Life in Rock. Tim Wheeler". Kerrang! (1235): 54.
  43. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'Goldfinger. The first song we recorded on the main album...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  44. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'We'd done quite a bit of work on Goldfinger during...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  45. ^ "Meltdown". Ash. Archived from the original on 1 April 2004. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  46. ^ a b c d e "Ash Gigography and Tour Dates (1996)". Ash. Archived from the original on 6 December 1998. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  47. ^ Cannon, Brian (15 April 2020). "Brian Cannon / Mictrodot on Twitter: 'The sleeve image almost delayed the release of the record...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  48. ^ "Ash Video Clips". Ash. Archived from the original on 9 February 1999. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  49. ^ Ash (15 April 2020). "Ash on Twitter: 'There were conversations with the record company during...'". Twitter. Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  50. ^ Kline, Steven (21 May 2018). "No Band Is An Island: Inside Ash's Incredible Voyage". Gigwise. Archived from the original on 22 May 2018. Retrieved 22 November 2020.
  51. ^ a b "Ash Gigography and Tour Dates (1997)". Ash. Archived from the original on 6 December 1998. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  52. ^ Citations regarding compilations and box sets:
    • Intergalactic Sonic 7"s (booklet). Ash. Infectious Records. 2003. INFEC120CDB.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
    • The Best of Ash (booklet). Ash. Warner Bros. Records. 2011. 2564664365.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
    • '94–'04 The 7" Singles Box Set (sleeve). Ash. BMG. 2019. BMGCAT391BOX.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
    • Teenage Wildlife: 25 Years of Ash (booklet). Ash. BMG. 2020. BMGCAT425DCD.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  53. ^ "irishcharts.com - Ash - 1977". Hung Medien. Archived from the original on 15 November 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  54. ^ "Ash To Tour Australia Playing 1977 In Full". The Music. 20 June 2013. Archived from the original on 19 November 2020. Retrieved 19 November 2020.
  55. ^ Heath, Michael (28 November 2016). "Interview: Ash (21/11/2016)". NME. Archived from the original on 19 October 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  56. ^ Live on Mars – London Astoria 1997 (booklet). Ash. Atomic Heart Records. 2016. ATOM063CD.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  57. ^ "Ash: 1977". Alternative Press (97): 70. August 1996.
  58. ^ Sullivan, Caroline (10 May 1996). "Ash: 1977 (Infectious)". The Guardian.
  59. ^ DeLuca, Dan (4 August 1996). "A guide to the explosion in pop music that's got the British all excited". The Philadelphia Inquirer.
  60. ^ a b Collins, Andrew (July 1996). "Ash: 1977". Q (118): 112.
  61. ^ Hiller, Joachim (1997). "Ash 1977 CD". Ox-Fanzine (in German). Archived from the original on 17 November 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  62. ^ a b Diver, Mike (2012). "Music - Review of Ash - 1977". BBC Music. Archived from the original on 30 September 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  63. ^ "Ash: 1977". Mojo: 118. 2008. [T]he bonus material commemorates Ash's early breadth, with a masterful cover of Abba's 'Does Your Mother Know?' offset by creditable faux-American post-hardcore in the shape of '5am Eternal.'
  64. ^ a b Murphy, John L. (13 July 2016). "Holy Hell! Ash's 1977 Turns Twenty!". Spectrum Culture. Archived from the original on 4 February 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  65. ^ "A Feature About Nothing: The 1990s in Lists - Page 4". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on 20 February 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  66. ^ a b "Official Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  67. ^ Bowler; Dray 1997, p. 120
  68. ^ a b "Official Scottish Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  69. ^ a b "Charts.nz – Ash – 1977". Hung Medien. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  70. ^ a b "Australiancharts.com – Ash – 1977". Hung Medien. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  71. ^ a b "Ash: 1977" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  72. ^ a b "Norwegiancharts.com – Ash – 1977". Hung Medien. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  73. ^ a b "Swisscharts.com – Ash – 1977". Hung Medien. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  74. ^ a b "Swedishcharts.com – Ash – 1977". Hung Medien. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  75. ^ a b "Offiziellecharts.de – Ash – 1977" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  76. ^ a b "Dutchcharts.nl – Ash – 1977" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
  77. ^ a b "British album certifications – Ash – 1977". British Phonographic Industry.
  78. ^ a b c d e "Chart Log UK: A - Azzido Da Bass". Zobbel.de. Archived from the original on 10 April 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  79. ^ "australian-charts.com - Discography Ash". Hung Medien. Archived from the original on 16 August 2016. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  80. ^ a b c d e f g h "Ash 1977 All Time Lists". Acclaimed Music. Archived from the original on 27 June 2017. Retrieved 21 January 2017.
  81. ^ a b Dimery, Robert; Lydon, Michael (2010). 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die: Revised and Updated Edition. Universe. ISBN 978-0-7893-2074-2.
  82. ^ "The 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time: 500-401". NME. 21 October 2013. Archived from the original on 6 August 2018. Retrieved 21 January 2017.
  83. ^ Stegall, Tim (25 June 2021). "Best punk albums of 1996 | Classic punk records". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 25 June 2021. Retrieved 25 June 2021.
  84. ^ "End of Year Album Chart Top 100 – 1996". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 9 August 2020. Retrieved 4 September 2020.

Sources

External linksEdit