1972 Giro d'Italia

The 1972 Giro d'Italia was the 55th running of the Giro d'Italia, one of cycling's Grand Tours races. The Giro started in Venice on 21 May, with a 5.2 km (3.2 mi) prologue and concluded with a 197 km (122 mi) mass-start stage, on 11 June. A total of 100 riders from ten teams entered the 20-stage race, that was won by Belgian Eddy Merckx of the Molteni team. The second and third places were taken by Spaniards José Manuel Fuente and Francisco Galdós, respectively.[1]

1972 Giro d'Italia
Race details
Dates21 May - 11 June
Stages20, including three split stages
Distance3,725 km (2,315 mi)
Winning time103h 04' 04"
Results
Winner  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (Molteni)
  Second  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) (KAS)
  Third  Francisco Galdós (ESP) (KAS)

Points  Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL) (Dreher)
  Mountains  José Manuel Fuente (ESP) (KAS)
  Combination  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (Molteni)
  Team Molteni
← 1971
1973 →

TeamsEdit

A total of ten teams were invited to participate in the 1972 Giro d'Italia.[2] Each team sent a squad of ten riders, which meant that the race started with a peloton of 100 cyclists.[2] In total, 63 riders were from Italy, while the remaining 37 riders came from: Belgium (18), Spain (10), Switzerland (6), Sweden (2), and Denmark (1).[3] Of those starting, 21 were riding the Giro d'Italia for the first time.[4] The average age of riders was 27.34 years,[5] ranging from 22–year–old Jürg Schneider from GBC to 38–year–old Aldo Moser of GBC.[6] The team with the youngest average rider age was Magniflex (25), while the oldest was Salvarani (29).[7] From the riders that began this edition, 69 made it to the finish on the Milan.[8][9]

The teams entering the race were:[2]

Pre-race favoritesEdit

Eddy Merckx (Molteni) entered as the unanimous favorite to win the event.[9][10][11][12] He had previously won the race in 1968 and 1970, but did not ride in 1971 in order to race the Tour de France, which he won.[9][13] Early in the season, he broke a vertebrae in a fall during the Paris–Nice.[14] Merckx entered the race as the reigning world champion,[9] with victories at Milan–San Remo and Liège–Bastogne–Liège in the season so far.[15] He was viewed to be in great physical shape coming into the race.[15] Despite his success, there were concerns that Merckx's constant racing during the 1969 and 1970 seasons might have diminished his capabilities.[15] The Molteni team was viewed to have strong supports for Merckx with Roger Swerts, Martin Van Den Bossche, and Jozef Spruyt.[15] It was known that Merckx wished to target the upcoming Tour de France and it was thought that he and his team would try to be conservative with their efforts at the Giro.[15] A third victory would tie Merckx with the likes of Giovanni Brunero, Gino Bartali, and Fiorenzo Magni, whom each had won the race three times.[9] Five-time champion Alfredo Binda commented that Merckx's participation "promises episodes of high competitive value, even if the Belgian is no longer the powerful athlete, almost irresistible from two years ago."[16] Binda commented that Merckx is vulnerable when considering his results from the previous season to the current one.[16]

Reigning champion Gösta Pettersson (Ferretti) was found to be a dangerous opponent.[9] Pettersson's teammate Gianni Motta was also viewed as a general classification threat, which was thought to hinder their chances as Merckx was the sole leader of his Molteni team.[9] The same was thought for the Salvarani team which featured two-time winner Felice Gimondi (1967 and 1969) and Italo Zilioli.[9] Gimondi stated before the race that on the fourth stage where the Blockhaus is climbed, "you will know what I am worth."[17] Binda felt Gimondi had the best chance of all the Italian competitors to win the general classification.[16] Spanish climbers José Manuel Fuente and Miguel María Lasa, both from the KAS team, were expected to disrupt Merckx in the mountains and could challenge for a high general classification ranking.[9] The KAS team was viewed as a strong squad after their stranglehold over the recent Vuelta a España where Fuente was victorious, but it was noted that featured minimal competition for the squad.[10]

Outside contenders for the race were Roger de Vlaeminck (Dreher), Ole Ritter (Dreher), Pierfranco Vianelli (Dreher), and Franco Bitossi (Filotex).[9][18] De Vlaeminck was viewed as a threat due to his victory at Paris–Roubaix and stage-race Tirreno–Adriatico.[8] He suffered scaphoid fracture before the race and got the cast removed before the race began and started the event with a bandage on his left wrist.[18][19] He stated he hoped his condition would improve before the race reached the Blockhaus.[18] In addition, one of de Vlaeminck's knees would be operated on in the fall.[18][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33]

Sprinters Marino Basso (Salvarani) and Patrick Sercu (Dreher) were thought to be the favorites to win the opening flat stages.[16] Notable absences from the race included Rik Van Linden (Magniflex) who had injured his foot in the Vuelta.[17]

Route and stagesEdit

Race director Vincenzo Torriani revealed the race route on 28 March 1972 in front of several journalists.[34] Torriani reported that Belgium had expressed interest in hosting the start of the race with a cash incentive, but arrived late in the process and would be considered for the 1973 edition.[34] After the routes announcement in March, it was modified and contained twenty days of racing, with three split stages, which covered a grand total of 3,716 km (2,309 mi),[9] which was reduced from the 3,794 km (2,357 mi) initially.[35] The race featured two rest days, the first of which was used to transfer from Messina to Rome on 30 May.[11] There were eleven stages containing seventeen categorized climbs that awarded points for the mountains classification across eleven stages.[36] In total, the race climbed 24.3 km (15.1 mi), 3.4 km (2.1 mi) less than the previous year.[36] The average length of each stage was 185.8 km (115.5 mi).[36] The route contained three time trial stages for a total of 58 km (36 mi).[9][34] One of the days featured two time trials each in Forte dei Marmi, where Torriani pitched the idea that there could be three winners on the stage, one for each winner of the split time trial stage and one winner for the best combined time from both performances.[34] At the initial route announcement there was speculation that a prologue would take place on 20 May in Venice,[34] but it was later reported to have failed because Torriani did not get approval from the Venetian government.[19]

The route began in Venice for the first time in race history and traveled south and crossed the Apennines until reaching the edge of the continental section of Italy.[9] The race transferred to Sicily for a stage.[9][34] Following the conclusion of Messina stage, the race had a rest day that was used to transfer for Rome.[9] The event continued north and reached the Alps before reaching the Alps and making a turn south and west to travel towards Milan for the finish.[9] The entire route crossed through the majority of Italian regions.[9]

It was believed Torriani made the race very mountainous in order to keep Merckx from overly dominating the race.[8] Author William Fotheringham shared that sentiment, specifically stating that Torriani designed the route in order to give José Manuel Fuente several opportunities to attack Eddy Merckx.[37] The race was predicted to be under poor weather for the majority of its duration.[19]

Stage characteristics and results[8]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
1 21 May Venice to Ravenna 196 km (122 mi)   Plain stage   Marino Basso (ITA)
2 22 May Ravenna to Fermo 212 km (132 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Gianni Motta (ITA)
3 23 May Porto San Giorgio to Francavilla al Mare 205 km (127 mi)   Plain stage   Ugo Colombo (ITA)
4a 24 May Francavilla al Mare to Blockhaus 48 km (30 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
4b Blockhaus to Foggia 210 km (130 mi)   Plain stage   Wilmo Francioni (ITA)
5 25 May Foggia to Montesano sulla Marcellana 238 km (148 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Fabrizio Fabbri (ITA)
6 26 May Montesano sulla Marcellana to Cosenza 190 km (118 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL)
7 27 May Cosenza to Catanzaro 151 km (94 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Gösta Pettersson (SWE)
8 28 May Catanzaro to Reggio Calabria 160 km (99 mi)   Plain stage   Attilio Benfatto (ITA)
9 29 May Messina to Messina 110 km (68 mi)   Plain stage   Albert Van Vlierberghe (BEL)
30 May Rest day
10 31 May Rome to Monte Argentario 166 km (103 mi)   Plain stage   Italo Zilioli (ITA)
11 1 June Monte Argentario to Forte dei Marmi 242 km (150 mi)   Plain stage   Miguel María Lasa (ESP)
12a 2 June Forte dei Marmi 20 km (12 mi)   Individual time trial   Eddy Merckx (BEL)
12b Forte dei Marmi 20 km (12 mi)   Individual time trial   Roger Swerts (BEL)
13 3 June Forte dei Marmi to Savona 200 km (124 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Wilmo Francioni (ITA)
14 4 June Savona to Monte Jafferau [it] 256 km (159 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Eddy Merckx (BEL)
5 June Rest day
15 6 June Parabiago to Parabiago 168 km (104 mi)   Plain stage   Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL)
16 7 June Parabiago to Livigno 256 km (159 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Eddy Merckx (BEL)
17 8 June Livigno to Passo dello Stelvio 88 km (55 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   José Manuel Fuente (ESP)
18 9 June Sulden to Asiago 223 km (139 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL)
19a 10 June Asiago to Arco 163 km (101 mi)   Stage with mountain(s)   Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL)
19b Arco to Arco 18 km (11 mi)   Individual time trial   Eddy Merckx (BEL)
20 11 June Arco to Milan 185 km (115 mi)   Plain stage   Enrico Paolini (ITA)
Total 3,725 km (2,315 mi)

Race overviewEdit

During the fourteenth stage, the race jury disqualified Zilioli, Motta and Bitossi, among others.[38]

Classification leadershipEdit

There were three main individual classifications contested in the 1972 Giro d'Italia, as well as a team competition. Two of them awarded jerseys to their leaders. The general classification was the most important and was calculated by adding each rider's finishing times on each stage.[39] The rider with the lowest cumulative time was the winner of the general classification and was considered the overall winner of the Giro.[39] The rider leading the classification wore a pink jersey to signify the classification's leadership.[39]

The second classification was the points classification. Riders received points for finishing in the top positions in a stage finish, with first place getting the most points, and lower placings getting successively fewer points down to fifteenth place.[39][40] The rider leading this classification wore a purple (or cyclamen) jersey.[39][41] The mountains classification was the third classification. In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists. Climbs were ranked in first and second categories, the former awarded 50, 30, and 20 points while the latter awarded 30, 20, and 10 points. In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists.[41] Most stages of the race included one or more categorized climbs, in which points were awarded to the riders that reached the summit first. In addition there was the Cima Coppi, the Passo dello Stelvio, which was the highest mountain crossed in this edition of the race.[36] For this designation it gave 200, 100, 80, 70, and 50 points to the first five riders summit the climb. The first rider over the Stelvio was José Manuel Fuente.

The final classification, the team classification, awarded no jersey to its leaders. This was calculated by adding together points earned by each rider on the team during each stage through the intermediate sprints, the categorized climbs, stage finishes, etc. The team with the most points led the classification.[39]

Classification leadership by stage
Stage Winner General classification
 
Points classification
 
Mountains classification Team classification
1 Marino Basso Marino Basso Marino Basso not awarded ?
2 Gianni Motta Gianni Motta
3 Ugo Colombo Ugo Colombo Franco Bitossi
4a José Manuel Fuente José Manuel Fuente Gianni Motta
4b Wilmo Francioni
5 Fabrizio Fabbri Franco Bitossi & Gianni Motta
6 Roger De Vlaeminck Gianni Motta
7 Gösta Pettersson Eddy Merckx Franco Bitossi Eddy Merckx & José Manuel Fuente
8 Attilio Benfatto
9 Albert Van Vlierberghe
10 Italo Zilioli
11 Miguel María Lasa Ferretti
12a Eddy Merckx ?
12b Roger Swerts Eddy Merckx
13 Wilmo Francioni Roger De Vlaeminck
14 Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx Molteni
15 Roger De Vlaeminck Roger De Vlaeminck
16 Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx José Manuel Fuente ?
17 José Manuel Fuente
18 Roger De Vlaeminck Roger De Vlaeminck
19a Roger De Vlaeminck Molteni
19b Eddy Merckx
20 Enrico Paolini
Final Eddy Merckx Roger De Vlaeminck José Manuel Fuente Molteni

Final standingsEdit

Legend
      Denotes the winner of the General classification       Denotes the winner of the Points classification

General classificationEdit

Final general classification (1–10)[8][41][42][43]
Rank Name Team Time
1   Eddy Merckx (BEL)   Molteni 103h 4' 04"
2   José Manuel Fuente (ESP) KAS + 5' 30"
3   Francisco Galdós (ESP) KAS + 10' 39"
4   Vicente López Carril (ESP) KAS + 11' 17"
5   Wladimiro Panizza (ITA) Zonca + 13' 00"
6   Gösta Pettersson (SWE) Ferretti + 13' 09"
7   Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL)   Dreher + 13' 52"
8   Felice Gimondi (ITA) Salvarani + 14' 05"
9   Miguel María Lasa (ESP) KAS + 14' 19"
10   Santiago Lazcano (ESP) KAS + 17' 42"

Mountains classificationEdit

Final mountains classification (1–7)[8][42][44]
Name Team Points
1   José Manuel Fuente (ESP) KAS 490
2   Pierfranco Vianelli (ITA) Dreher 350
3   Primo Mori (ITA) Salvarani 260
4   Lino Farisato (ITA) Ferretti 150
5   Vicente López-Carril (ESP) KAS 100
6   Lino Farisato (ITA) Ferretti 60
7   Fabrizio Fabbri (ITA) KAS 50
  Santiago Lazcano (ESP) KAS
  Silvano Schiavon (ITA) G.B.C.-Sony

Points classificationEdit

Final points classification (1–10)[8][41]
Name Team Points
1   Roger De Vlaeminck (BEL)   Dreher 264
2   Eddy Merckx (BEL)   Molteni 244
3   Miguel María Lasa (ESP) KAS 182
4   Felice Gimondi (ITA) Salvarani 167
5   Ole Ritter (DEN) Dreher 130
6   Roger Swerts (BEL) Molteni 121
7   Michele Dancelli (ITA) Ferretti 116
8   José Manuel Fuente (ESP) KAS 95
9   Albert van Vlierberghe (BEL) Ferretti 82
10   Gösta Pettersson (SWE) Ferretti 78

Traguardi tricolori classificationEdit

Final traguardi tricolori classification (1–10)[41]
Name Team Points
1   Giancarlo Polidori (ITA) Scic 220
2   Eddy Merckx (BEL)   Molteni 90
3   Guerrino Tosello (ITA) Salvarani 40
  Giacinto Santambrogio (ITA) Salvarani
5   Marcello Bergamo (ITA) Filotex 60
6   Michele Dancelli (ITA) Scic 50
7   Albert van Vlierberghe (BEL) Ferretti 40
  Wladimiro Panizza (ITA) Zonca
9   Roger Swerts (BEL) Molteni 30
  Emilio Casalini (ITA) Salvarani
  Mario Anni (ITA) Ferretti
  Wilmo Francioni (ITA) Ferretti
  Joseph Bruyère (BEL) Molteni
  Ugo Colombo (ITA) Filotex
  Fabrizio Fabbri (ITA) Magniflex

Teams classificationEdit

Final team classification (1–10)[42][43]
Team Points
1 Molteni 6120
2 KAS 4721
3 Ferretti 3851
4 Dreher 3202
5 Filotex 3120
6 Salvarani 2956
7 Scic 2464
8 G.B.C.-Sony 1379
9 Magniflex 1347
10 Zonca 1139

Minor classificationsEdit

Merckx also won the combination classification which was calculated by totaling each rider's placement in the general, points, and mountains classifications.[43]

ReferencesEdit

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ "Detras de Merckx... ¡Solo Los Españoles!" [Behind Merckx... Only the Spanish!] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 12 June 1972. p. 25. Archived from the original on 1 July 2013. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  2. ^ a b c "La Carica Dei Cento" [The Charge of a Hundred]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 20 May 1972. p. 8. Archived from the original on 2 January 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  3. ^ "Giro d'Italia – 1972 Riders per nation". ProCyclingStats. Archived from the original on 15 June 2020. Retrieved 13 October 2016.
  4. ^ "Giro d'Italia – 1972 Debutants". ProCyclingStats. Archived from the original on 16 June 2020. Retrieved 13 October 2016.
  5. ^ "Giro d'Italia – 1972 Peloton averages". ProCyclingStats. Archived from the original on 16 June 2020. Retrieved 13 October 2016.
  6. ^ "Giro d'Italia – 1972 Oldest competitors". ProCyclingStats. Archived from the original on 16 June 2020. Retrieved 13 October 2016.
  7. ^ "Giro d'Italia – 1972 Average team age". ProCyclingStats. Archived from the original on 16 June 2020. Retrieved 13 October 2016.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Bill and Carol McGann. "1972 Giro d'Italia". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Archived from the original on 27 February 2014. Retrieved 2012-07-10.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Une fois de plus, Eddy Merckx sera l'homme à battre" [Once again, Eddy Merckx will be the man to beat] (PDF). L'Impartial (in French). 20 May 1972. p. 23. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 October 2019 – via RERO.
  10. ^ a b Juan Plans Bosch (18 May 1972). "Un solo, unico y exclusivo favorito: Merckx" [A single, unique and exclusive favorite: Merckx] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo S.A. p. 23. Archived (PDF) from the original on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 20 August 2019.
  11. ^ a b "Deel van Giro-ritten rechtstreeks op televisie" [Part of Giro rides directly on television]. Limburgsch Sport Dagblad (in Dutch). 19 May 1972. p. 1 – via Delpher.
  12. ^ "Pronostico facile: Merckx!" [Easy prediction: Merckx] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  13. ^ "Merckx: no al Giro d'Italia" [Merckx: No to the Tour of Italy] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 16 January 1971. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  14. ^ Fotheringham 2013, p. 181.
  15. ^ a b c d e Gino Sala (21 May 1972). "Il faro e Merckx ma per brillare la corsa ha bisogno di altre luci" [The lighthouse is Merckx but to shine the race needs more lights] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 14. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  16. ^ a b c d Gino Sala (20 May 1972). "Alfredo Binda spiega perché Merckx può essere battuto" [Alfredo Binda explains why Merckx can be beaten] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  17. ^ a b Gino Sala (20 May 1972). "Gimondi: <<Sul Block Haus sapete quanto valgo>>" [Gimondi: << On the Block Haus you know how much I am worth>>] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  18. ^ a b c d Gino Sala (21 May 1972). "De Vlaeminck al "via" con il polso fasciato" [De Vlaeminck on the go with a bandaged wrist] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 14. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  19. ^ a b c Gino Sala (19 May 1972). "Giro d'Italia: ci sara Roger De Vlaeminck" [Giro d'Italia: Roger De Vlaeminck will be there] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  20. ^ Gino Sala (18 May 1972). "Speranza e necessita di un bel Giro" [Hope and needs a nice tour] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  21. ^ "Ecco i loro pronostici firmati" [Here are their signed predictions] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  22. ^ "De Vlaeminck, Vianelli, Ritter, e Maggioni promettono una corsa d'attacco" [De Vlaeminck, Vianelli, Ritter, and Maggioni promise an attacking race] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  23. ^ "Michelotto, Aldo Moser, e Schiavon per la classifica" [Michelotto, Aldo Moser, and Schiavon for the ranking] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  24. ^ "Albani pensa che Merckx esploderà nel finale" [Albani thinks that Merckx will explode in the final] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  25. ^ "Scoprire Perletto Rilanciare Boifava" [Discover Perletto Rilanciare Boifava] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  26. ^ "Ogni giorno dal Giro la curiosità del giorno" [Every day from the Giro the curiosity of the day] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 11. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  27. ^ "Gimondi, Zilioli e il <<jolly>> Toni Houbrechts" [Gimondi, Zilioli and the <<jolly>> Toni Houbrechts] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  28. ^ "Francesco Moser e Den Hertog per il Giro d'ITalia dei dilettanti e per le Olimpiadi" [Francesco Moser and Den Hertog for the Tour of Italy for amateurs and for the Olympics] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 12. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  29. ^ "Giacomo Bazzan e l'uomo di punta di una squadra ricca di promesse" [Giacomo Bazzan is the top man of a team full of promises] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  30. ^ "<<Vedremo un ottimo Dancelli!>>" [<< We will see an excellent Dancelli! >>] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 14. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  31. ^ "Attenzione a Pintens, Fabbri e Van Linden" [Attention to Pintens, Fabbri and Van Linden] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 15. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  32. ^ "In prima linea coi Pettersson e Gianni Motta" [On the front line with Pettersson and Gianni Motta] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 16. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  33. ^ "Bitossi, Colombo, Fuchs sono le tre pedine di Waldemaro Bartolozzi" [Bitossi, Colombo, Fuchs are the three pawns of Waldemaro Bartolozzi] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 16. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  34. ^ a b c d e f Gino Sala (29 March 1972). "Questo Il <<Giro>> 1972" [This is the 1972 <<Giro>>] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. p. 10. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 April 2019. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  35. ^ Juan Plans Bosch (20 May 1972). "Merckx debera <<entrar en escena>> desde los primeros compases del <<Giro>>" [Merckx should << enter the scene >> from the first bars of the <<Giro>>] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo S.A. p. 11. Archived (PDF) from the original on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 20 August 2019.
  36. ^ a b c d "Il Giro di Ieri e di Oggi" [The Giro of Yesterday and Today] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 18 May 1972. p. 9. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  37. ^ Fotheringham 2013, p. 186-187.
  38. ^ "1972". Giro d'Italia. La Gazzetta dello Sport. 2017. Archived from the original on 1 July 2017. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  39. ^ a b c d e f Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2013.
  40. ^ "Regolamento" [Regulation]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 19 May 1966. p. 9. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  41. ^ a b c d e "Il Giro In Cifre" [The Tour In Figures]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 12 June 1972. p. 13. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013.
  42. ^ a b c "Classificaciones Oficiales" [Official Classifications] (PDF) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 12 June 1972. p. 26. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-01-02. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  43. ^ a b c "Paolini primattore nella gremita Piazza del Duomo" [Paolini leading man in the crowded Piazza del Duomo] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian). PCI. 12 June 1972. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 June 2020. Retrieved 27 May 2012.
  44. ^ "Giro, Merckx verso il trionfo" [Tour, Merckx to triumph] (PDF). La Stampa (in Italian). Editrice La Stampa. 11 June 1972. p. 19. Retrieved 27 May 2012.

BibliographyEdit