1967 Menzel

1967 Menzel (prov. designation: A905 VC) is a stony background asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 1 November 1905, by German astronomer Max Wolf at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany, and later named after American astrophysicist Donald Howard Menzel.[2][15]

1967 Menzel
001967-asteroid shape model (1967) Menzel.png
Modelled shape of Menzel from its lightcurve
Discovery [1]
Discovered byM. F. Wolf
Discovery siteHeidelberg Obs.
Discovery date1 November 1905
Designations
(1967) Menzel
Named after
Donald Menzel
(American astrophysicist)[2]
A905 VC · 1930 DS
1965 SF · 1965 VH
1970 EM · 1973 CE
1975 UH · 1975 VE
main-belt · (inner) [3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc111.50 yr (40,724 days)
Aphelion2.5437 AU
Perihelion1.9238 AU
2.2337 AU
Eccentricity0.1388
3.34 yr (1,219 days)
183.67°
0° 17m 42.72s / day
Inclination3.9008°
57.801°
347.83°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
9.588±0.181 km[1][4]
10.138±0.092 km[5]
10.18 km (taken)[3]
10.182 km[6]
2.834±0.001 h[7]
2.8343±0.0003 h[a]
2.8344±0.0002 h[b]
2.8346±0.0003 h[8]
2.83481±0.00001 h[9]
2.83497±0.00005 h[9]
2.835±0.001 h[10]
2.8350±0.0005 h[11]
2.8364±0.0005 h[12]
2.84±0.03 h[13]
0.2145[6]
0.2279±0.0397[5]
0.251±0.070[1][4]
S[3]
11.76±0.03 (R)[b] · 12.1[1] · 12.21[5] · 12.25±0.058[3][6] · 12.34±0.23[14]

Classification and orbitEdit

Menzel is a stony S-type asteroid that orbits the Sun in the inner main-belt at a distance of 1.9–2.5 AU once every 3 years and 4 months (1,219 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.14 and an inclination of 4° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's observation arc begins with its first used observation at Goethe Link Observatory in 1965, or 60 years after its official discovery, with a number of unused observations previously made at Heidelberg.[15]

NamingEdit

This minor planet was named after American astrophysicist Donald Howard Menzel (1901–1976), who was the director of the Harvard College Observatory and a pioneer in theoretical and observational astrophysics. Menzel, a mentor of several prolific astronomers, calculated Atomic Transition Probabilities, analysed the composition of stars from their spectra, studied the physics of gaseous nebulae and the Sun's chromosphere, observed solar eclipses, and measured the rotation period of Uranus and Neptune by means of spectroscopy. Menzel was also popular for debunking UFO sightings.[2] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 18 April 1977 (M.P.C. 4158).[16]

Physical characteristicsEdit

Between September 2005 and November 2015, a total of least 10 rotational lightcurves were obtained for this asteroid from photometric observations from several observatories all over the world. They all gave a concurring, well-defined rotation period of 2.83–2.84 hours with a brightness variation between 0.24 and 0.39 magnitude.(U=3/3/3/3/3/3/3/3/2+/3).[7][8][9][11][10][12][13][a][b]

According to the space-based survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, Menzel measures between 9.6 and 10.2 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo between 0.21 and 0.25.[1][5][6] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link derives a typical albedo for stony asteroids of 0.21 and a diameter of 10.1 kilometers, with an absolute magnitude of 12.25.[3]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Pravec (2010) web: rotation period 2.8343±0.0003 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.25 mag. Summary figures for (1967) Menzel at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) and Pravec, P.; Wolf, M.; Sarounova, L. (2010)
  2. ^ a b c Pravec (2007) web: rotation period 2.8344±0.0002 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.24 magnitude. Summary figures for (1967) Menzel at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) and Pravec, P.; Wolf, M.; Sarounova, L. (2007)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 1967 Menzel (A905 VC)" (2017-05-02 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(1967) Menzel". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1967) Menzel. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 158. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_1968. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  3. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (1967) Menzel". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  4. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90.
  6. ^ a b c d Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  7. ^ a b Lecrone, Crystal; Duncan, Allison; Hudson, Erin; Johnson, Jama; Mulvihill, Alex; Reichert, Chris; et al. (September 2006). "2005-2006 fall observing campaign at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology" (PDF). Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (3): 66–67. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...66L. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  8. ^ a b Higgins, David (March 2008). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at Hunters Hill Observatory and Collaborating Stations: April 2007 - June 2007" (PDF). Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (1): 30–32. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...30H. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  9. ^ a b c Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (1967) Menzel". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  10. ^ a b Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Hendrickx, Sebastian; Madden, Karl; Montgomery, Samuel (April 2016). "Lightcurves for Shape/Spin Models" (PDF). Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (2): 123–128. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43..123K. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  11. ^ a b Pray, Donald P. (March 2006). "Lightcurve analysis of asteroids 326, 329, 426, 619, 1829, 1967, 2453, 10518 and 42267" (PDF). Minor Planet Bulletin. 33 (1): 4–5. Bibcode:2006MPBu...33....4P. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  12. ^ a b Clark, Maurice (January 2015). "Asteroid Photometry from the Preston Gott Observatory" (PDF). Minor Planet Bulletin. 42 (1): 15–20. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42...15C. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  13. ^ a b Liu, Junda (January 2016). "Rotation Period Analysis for 1967 Menzel" (PDF). Minor Planet Bulletin. 43 (1): 98–99. Bibcode:2016MPBu...43...98L. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  14. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  15. ^ a b "1967 Menzel (A905 VC)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  16. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. "Appendix – Publication Dates of the MPCs". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – Addendum to Fifth Edition (2006–2008). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 221. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-01965-4. ISBN 978-3-642-01964-7.

External linksEdit