1963–64 in English football

The 1963–1964 season was the 84th season of competitive football in England, from August 1963 to May 1964.

Diary of the seasonEdit

  • 17 August 1963 – Reigning league champions Everton won the Charity Shield after a 4–0 win over FA Cup winners Manchester United.
  • 24 August 1963 - The Football League season commences. Everton begin their defence of the First Division title with a 3-0 home win over Fulham. Their Merseyside rivals begin the campaign with a 2-1 win over Blackburn Rovers at Ewood Park. Bobby Charlton scores twice in Manchester United's 3-3 away draw with Sheffield Wednesday. More than 46,000 fans watch Chelsea's First Division comeback begin with a goalless draw at home to West Ham United. Stoke City, the other newly promoted side, win 2-1 at home to Tottenham Hotspur.[1]
  • 28 August 1963 - Bobby Smith and Jimmy Greaves score two goals each for Tottenham Hotspur in a 4-1 away league win over Wolverhampton Wanderers. Denis Law scores both of Manchester United's goals in a 2-0 home win over Ipswich Town.[2]
  • 31 August 1963 - After three games, Leicester City and Manchester United lead the way in the First Division, with Leicester beating Arsenal 7-2 at Filbert Street today, while a crowd of more than 63,000 watch Manchester United beat Everton 5-1 at Old Trafford. Jimmy Greaves gets a hat-trick in Tottenham Hotspur's 4-1 home win over Nottingham Forest in front of a crowd of nearly 50,000.[3]
  • 3 September 1963 - Manchester United's strong start to the First Division season continues with a 7-2 win over Ipswich Town at Portman Road.[4]
  • 7 September 1963 - Andy McEvoy scores four goals for Blackburn Rovers in a 7-2 win over Tottenham Hotspur at Ewood Park. Manchester United stay top of the First Division despite being held to a 1-1 draw at Birmingham City.[5]
  • 14 September 1963 – George Best, a 17-year-old Northern Irish winger, makes his debut for Manchester United in their 1–0 First Division win over West Bromwich Albion. Young wing-half David Sadler scores the only goal of the game for the league leaders. Jimmy Greaves gets a hat-trick for Tottenham Hotspur in a 6-1 home win over Blackpool. Third placed Blackburn Rovers continue their strong start to the season with a 5-1 away win over Wolves.[6]
  • 21 September 1963 - Manchester United's 2-1 defeat at Arsenal allows Nottingham Forest to go top of the First Division with their 3-1 home win over Bolton Wanderers. A 57,401-strong crowd at Stamford Bridge watches Tottenham Hotspur beat Chelsea 3-0.[7]
  • 28 September 1963 - Manchester United return to the top of the First Division with a 3-1 home win over Leicester City in a repeat of the FA Cup final four months ago. The Merseyside derby at Anfield attracts a crowd of nearly 52,000 and ends with Ian Callaghan scoring both of Liverpool's goals in a 2-1 win over Everton. Down in the Second Division, Swindon Town are thriving in their first season at this level, top of the table after 10 games.[8]
  • 2 October 1963 - Tottenham Hotspur go top of the First Division when another hat-trick from Jimmy Greaves helps them overcome Birmingham City 6-1 at White Hart Lane, while Manchester United are held to a 1-1 draw by Chelsea at Stamford Bridge.[9]
  • 5 October 1963 - A David Herd goal sends Manchester United back to the top of the First Division as they beat Bolton Wanderers 1-0 at Burnden Park, while Tottenham Hotspur are held to a 3-3 draw by Sheffield United at Bramall Lane. West Bromwich Albion squander the chance of going level with the leaders by losing 3-1 at home to Sheffield Wednesday.[10]
  • 8 October 1963 - Nottingham Forest keep up their title push with a 2-0 win over Leicester City at the City Ground.[11]
  • 15 October 1963 - The North London derby at Highbury pulls in a crowd of almost 68,000, who are entertained by a 4-4 draw between Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur. Defending champions Everton boost their hopes of retaining the title with a 4-1 home win over Sheffield United.[12]
  • 19 October 1963 - Manchester United return to the top of the First Division with a 2-1 away win over Nottingham Forest, while Sheffield United are now level on points with United and Tottenham Hotspur after a 3-0 home win over Birmingham City, boosting hopes of a first league title win since 1898 and a first major trophy win since their FA Cup triumph of 1925. A Lancashire derby at Ewood Park sees winger John Connelly score both of Burnley's goals in a 2-1 win over Blackburn Rovers.[13]
  • 23 October 1963 – an England versus Rest of the World XI match is staged to mark the centenary of The Football Association. Against a star-studded opposition team containing Alfredo Di Stéfano, Ferenc Puskás, Denis Law, Lev Yashin and Eusébio, England won 2–1 with goals from Terry Paine and Jimmy Greaves, while Denis Law scored for the Rest of the World.
  • 26 October 1963 - Sheffield United go top of the First Division with a 2-1 win over Burnley at Turf Moor as Manchester United lose 2-1 at home to West Ham United.[14]
  • 28 October 1963 - Manchester United miss the chance to go back to the top of the First Division when Blackburn Rovers hold them to a 2-2 draw at Old Trafford.[15]
  • 2 November 1963 - Sheffield United are still top of the First Division despite being held to a 2-2 draw at home by Arsenal, as Manchester United lose 2-0 at Wolves. An eight-goal thriller at the Victoria Ground sees Stoke City draw 4-4 with Burnley.[16]
  • 4 November 1963 - Arsenal go second in the First Division with a 4-1 home win over Birmingham City, boosting manager Billy Wright's of adding to the three league titles he won with Wolves as a player.[17]
  • 9 November 1963 - Sheffield United retain their lead of the First Division with a 1-0 away win over Leicester City. Denis Law scores a hat-trick as Manchester United return to their winning ways by beating Tottenham Hotspur 4-1 at Old Trafford. Everton's hopes of retaining the league title are dented by a 4-2 home defeat to Blackburn Rovers, with Fred Pickering scoring a hat-trick for the visitors. Things are looking increasingly grim for Ipswich Town, who have just won just one of their first 17 league games and are propping up the table just two seasons after being champions.[18]
  • 16 November 1963 - The first round FA Cup ties produce victories for non-league Gateshead and Yeovil Town at the expense of Football League opposition. In the First Division, Manchester United's title hopes are hit by a 4-0 defeat to Aston Villa at Villa Park. Sheffield United remain top despite losing 1-0 at home to Bolton Wanderers. Liverpool close in on the leaders with a 2-0 home win over Fulham. The Victoria Ground is the scene of another eight-goal thriller, with Stoke City grinding out another 4-4 draw, this time with Sheffield Wednesday.[19]
  • 23 November 1963 - Liverpool go top of the First Division on goal average with a 1-0 win over Manchester United at Old Trafford. Blackburn Rovers are their nearest challengers after an Andy McEvoy hat-trick gives them a 3-1 win over West Bromwich Albion at The Hawthorns, although Arsenal (who beat Blackpool 5-3 at Highbury) and Tottenham Hotspur (who win 3-2 at Ipswich Town) are both level with the top two.[20]
  • 25 November 1963 - Kettering Town become the third non-league team to defeat Football League opposition when they win 3-2 at Millwall in their first round replay.[21]
  • 30 November 1963 - Liverpool remain top of the First Division with a 2-0 home win over Burnley, although Blackburn Rovers remain level with them after a 4-1 home win over Arsenal, with Fred Pickering scoring another hat-trick and Andy McEvoy also getting on the scoresheet in today's encounter at Ewood Park. Manchester United keep up their title push with a 2-1 away win over Sheffield United, with Denis Law scoring twice.[22]
  • 3 December 1963 - In a rare all-English European clash, a crowd of 54,447 watches Tottenham Hotspur beat Manchester United 2-0 in the European Cup Winners' cup second round first leg at White Hart Lane.[23]
  • 7 December 1963 - Yeovil Town's FA Cup run sees them oust their second Football League opponents as they win their Second Round tie 3-1 at home to Crystal Palace. Denis Law scores four goals in Manchester United's 5-2 home win over Stoke City in the First Division. Tottenham Hotspur's 3-1 away win over Bolton Wanderers brings them level on points with leaders Liverpool and second-placed Blackburn Rovers, who are both held to draws.[24]
  • 10 December 1963 - Manchester United overturn a two-goal deficit by beating Tottenham Hotspur 4-1 in the European Cup second round second leg at Old Trafford, taking them into their first European quarter-final for six seasons. In the league, Arsenal go level on points with the top three with a 6-0 home win over Everton, although they have played more games than the pace-setters in the title race.[25]
  • 14 December 1963 - Blackburn Rovers go top of the First Division and knock Liverpool off the top in the process when two goals from Andy McEvoy give them a 2-1 win at Anfield. David Herd scores a hat-trick in Manchester United's 3-1 home win over Sheffield Wednesday.[26]
  • 26 December 1963 – A total of 66 goals are scored in the 10 First Division fixtures to be played on Boxing Day. Fulham are the highest-scoring side of the day, beating bottom of the table Ipswich Town 10-1 at Craven Cottage. Leaders Blackburn Rovers beat West Ham United 8-2 at Upton Park with Fred Pickering and Andy McEvoy both scoring hat-tricks. A local derby at the Molineux sees Wolves draw 3-3 at home to Aston Villa. Manchester United see their First Division title hopes take a fresh blow with a 6-1 defeat to Burnley at Turf Moor. The lower divisions also see a few high-scoring games, including Manchester City's 8-1 home win over Scunthorpe United in the Second Division, an eight-goal thriller between Watford and Walsall at Vicarage Road which the Hertfordshire side win 5-3, as well as the Fourth Division attracting its highest crowd of the season with 18,633 watching Workington drawing 2-2 with their local rivals Carlisle United at Borough Park.[27]
  • 28 December 1963 - The last action of 1963 sees George Best score his first senior goal in Manchester United's 5-1 home win over Burnley. Blackburn Rovers lose 3-1 at home to West Ham United but remain top of the First Division as Tottenham Hotspur lose 2-0 at home to West Bromwich Albion and squander the chance to go top. Ipswich Town inflict swift revenge on Fulham for the humiliation at Craven Cottage two days ago and win the Portman Road clash 4-2.[28]
  • 4 January 1964 - Second Division Newcastle United suffer a shock exit from the FA Cup in third round, losing 2-1 at home to non-league Bedford Town in the biggest shock result which this season's contest has so far produced. There is no such disappointment for holders Manchester United, who face Southampton in a rematch of last season's semi final, and win 3-2 at The Dell. Last season's finalists Leicester City lose 3-2 at home to Leyton Orient. Liverpool beat Derby County 5-0 at Anfield in their third round tie. Sheffield Wednesday suffer a shock exit at the hands of Fourth Division underdogs Newport County, losing 3-2 at Somerton Park.[29]
  • 7 January 1964 - Having been held to a draw by Third Division underdogs Hull City at Boothferry Park three days ago, Everton end the Humberside club's hopes of a major FA Cup upset by winning the third round replay 3-1 at Goodison Park in front of a crowd of more than 56,000.[30]
  • 8 January 1964 - The latest round of FA Cup third round replays including Aston Villa's shock 2-1 defeat at Aldershot from the Fourth Division, while non-league Bath City's run is ended by a 3-0 defeat to Bolton Wanderers at Burnden Park.[31]
  • 11 January 1964 - Tottenham Hotspur knock Blackburn Rovers off the top of the table and replace the Lancashire side as First Division leaders with a 4-1 win at White Hart Lane in which Jimmy Greaves scores another hat-trick. Liverpool keep up the pressure with a 2-1 home win over Chelsea. David Layne scores a hat-trick in Sheffield Wednesday's 4-1 away win over Ipswich Town.[32]
  • 18 January 1964 - Tottenham Hotspur maintain their lead of the First Division with a 2-0 win over Blackpool at Bloomfield Road. Two goals from Denis Law and one each from Bobby Charlton and George Best give Manchester United a 4-1 away win over West Bromwich Albion.[33]
  • 25 January 1964 - Tottenham Hotspur are now four points ahead of Blackburn Rovers with a game in hand at the top of the First Division after beating Aston Villa 3-1 at White Hart Lane in the day's only First Division action. All eyes are otherwise on the FA Cup fourth round, where holders Manchester United ease past Bristol Rovers 4-1 at Old Trafford. Liverpool are held to a surprise goalless draw by Third Division underdogs Port Vale at Anfield. Bedford Town, the last non-league team in the competition, are eliminated 3-0 at home by Carlisle United.[34]
  • 27 January 1964 - Liverpool beat Port Vale 2-1 in the FA Cup fourth round replay at Vale Park, which holds one of its largest crowds ever as more than 42,000 fans pack the 14-year-old stadium for the rare visit of First Division opponents. Preston North End overcome Bolton Wanderers 2-1 in front of more than 38,000 fans at Deepdale in tonight's other fourth round replay.[35]
  • 28 January 1964 - More than 66,000 fans pack Goodison Park to watch Everton beat Leeds United in the FA Cup fourth round replay. Sheffield United lose 4-0 to Swansea Town in the Vetch Field replay. Oxford United also go through to the FA Cup fifth round in only their second season as a Football League side, winning 2-1 at Brentford.[36]
  • 29 January 1964 - Arsenal remain in the hunt for the double by beating West Bromwich Albion 2-0 in front of a 57,698 crowd at Highbury in the FA Cup fourth round replay. West Ham United remain in the hunt for their first major trophy with a 3-0 win over London rivals Leyton Orient in front of more than 35,000 fans in the Upton Park replay. In the Second Division, Southampton beat Scunthorpe United 7-2 at The Dell.[37]
  • 1 February 1964 - Ian St John scores a hat-trick in Liverpool's 6-1 home win over Sheffield United in the First Division. Ipswich Town boost their survival hopes with a 3-2 home win over Birmingham City. Manchester United beat Arsenal 3-1 at Old Trafford.[38]
  • 5 February 1964 - The semi-final first legs of the Football League Cup are played. Just over 14,000 fans sees Leicester City beat West Ham United 4-3 at Filbert Street, while fewer than 17,000 fans attend the match at Maine Road where Manchester City defeat Stoke City 1-0.[39]
  • 8 February 1964 - 66,515 fans pack Goodison Park for the Merseyside derby and watch Everton beat Liverpool 3-1. Manchester United's title hopes are hit by a 3-2 away defeat to Leicester City. A London clash at Upton Park sees Tottenham Hotspur go down 4-0 to West Ham United.[40]
  • 15 February 1964 - Liverpool keep their double hopes alive with a 1-0 away win over Arsenal in the FA Cup fifth round. More than 38,000 fans pack into Oakwell to watch Barnsley host Manchester United, with the visitors coming away from South Yorkshire 4-0 winners. Oxford United go through to the last eight with a shock 3-1 home win over Blackburn Rovers, watched by nearly 22,000 fans in the compact Manor Ground. West Ham United go through with a 3-1 away win over Swindon Town.[41]
  • 18 February 1964 - Swansea Town secure a rare FA Cup quarter-final appearance by beating Stoke City 2-0 in the fifth round replay at the Vetch Field in front of a crowd of nearly 30,000. On the First Division scene, Everton keep up their bid for back-to-back league titles with a 3-0 home win over Birmingham City.[42]
  • 19 February 1964 - Three First Division fixtures are played this evening - all involving teams in the title race. Liverpool are held to a 2-2 draw at Aston Villa, Blackburn Rovers draw 1-1 at Fulham, but Manchester United give their title hopes a major boost with a 5-0 home win over Bolton Wanderers, whose own hopes of avoiding relegation are hit hard as a result.[43]
  • 22 February 1964 - Manchester United continue their surge towards the top of the table with a 3-1 away win over Blackburn Rovers in a title crunch game at Ewood Park, although leaders Tottenham Hotspur win the North London derby at White Hart Lane 3-1 against Arsenal. John Byrne gets a hat-trick for West Ham United in a 4-3 home win over Sheffield Wednesday.[44]
  • 26 February 1964 - Manchester United, in contention for three major trophies, beating Portuguese side Sporting Lisbon 4-1 in the European Cup Winners' Cup quarter-final first leg at Old Trafford.[45]
  • 28 February 1964 - Everton go second in the First Division with a 4-2 home win over Aston Villa in front of a crowd of more than 50,000.[46]
  • 29 February 1964 - Liverpool's double hopes are ended with a shock 2-1 defeat at home to Swansea Town in the FA Cup quarter final. Manchester United's clash with Sunderland goes to a replay after they draw 3-3 at Old Trafford. Oxford United's FA Cup adventure comes to an end when they lose 2-1 at home to Preston North End. West Ham United move closer to their first major trophy win by defeating Burnley 3-2 at Upton Park. In the First Division, Bolton Wanderers remain deep in relegation trouble with a 5-0 defeat at home to local rivals Blackburn Rovers, while Ipswich Town boost their survival hopes with a 1-0 home win over Sheffield United.[47]
  • 4 March 1964 - Manchester United's quarter-final tie with Sunderland goes to a second replay following a 2-2 draw at Roker Park. In the First Division, title-chasing Liverpool are held to a 2-2 draw at Hillsborough by Sheffield Wednesday, while Stoke City beat Chelsea 2-0 to boost their bid to avoid relegation.[48]
  • 7 March 1964 - Andy McEvoy puts four goals past Leicester City as Blackburn Rovers win 5-2 at Ewood Park to maintain their First Division title push, while Liverpool's 6-0 home win over Ipswich Town turns up the heat further in the title race and sends their visitors closer to relegation, as does Everton's 4-2 win at leaders Tottenham Hotspur. Birmingham City are still very much in danger of sliding into the bottom two after a 5-1 defeat away to local rivals Wolves.[49]
  • 9 March 1964 - Manchester United win their second FA Cup quarter-final replay with nearly 55,000 fans packing into the neutral venue of Leeds Road to watch them defeat Sunderland 5-1.[50]
  • 10 March 1964 - Everton boost their title bid by paying a club record £85,000 for Blackburn Rovers forward Fred Pickering.[51]
  • 14 March 1964 - Manchester United's double hopes are ended with a 3-1 defeat to West Ham United in front of a 65,000-strong in the Hillsborough FA Cup semi-final. In the other semi-final clash at Villa Park, Preston North End beat Swansea Town 2-1 in front of a 68,000-strong crowd. In the First Division, Bobby Tambling scores all four of Chelsea's goals in a 4-2 away win over London rivals Arsenal, while Fred Pickering gets a hat-trick on his debut in Everton's 6-1 home win over Nottingham Forest. Liverpool's title hopes take a knock with a 1-0 defeat at Fulham.[52]
  • 18 March 1964 - Manchester United squander a second trophy in four days when they go down 5-0 in Portugal to Sporting Lisbon, a remarkable downturn after going up 4-1 in the first leg.[53]
  • 20 March 1964 - Liverpool go top of the First Division with a 2-0 home win over Bolton Wanderers.[54]
  • 21 March 1964 - Within 24 hours of Liverpool going top of the First Division, Everton take over as league leaders with a 2-1 away win over Blackburn Rovers. Another key game in the title race sees Manchester United win 3-2 away to Tottenham Hotspur. Ipswich Town move closer to relegation with a 9-1 defeat to Stoke City at the Victoria Ground, with Dennis Viollet scoring his first hat-trick in the top flight since his Manchester United days.[55]
  • 23 March 1964 - Leicester City get through to the Football League Cup final with a 2-0 away win over Leicester City in the semi-final second leg. Manchester United draw 1-1 at home to Chelsea in the evening's only First Division action.[56]
  • 30 March 1964 - Nearly 53,000 fans pack into Anfield to watch Liverpool go top of the First Division with a 3-1 home win over Tottenham Hotspur.[57]
  • 1 April 1964 - A 10-goal thriller at The Dell sees Southampton beat Derby County 6-4 in the Second Division.[58]
  • 4 April 1964 - The First Division title is now looking likely to be won by one of the two Merseyside clubs after Liverpool beat Manchester United 3-0 at Anfield, while Everton's title hopes are dented by a 3-2 defeat at Stoke City.[59]
  • 5 April 1964 - Tottenham captain Danny Blanchflower, 38, announces his retirement from playing.
  • 6 April 1964 - Manchester United keep their title hopes alive with a Denis Law goal gives them a 1-0 home win over Aston Villa. Chelsea still have an outside chance of winning the title on goal average when a Ron Harris goal gives them the only goal of a home win over Leicester City. In the Second Division, Sunderland take a big step towards promotion to the First Division with a 5-2 away win over Leyton Orient.[60]
  • 8 April 1964 - Blackburn Rovers are announced as England's participant in the 1964 edition of the International Soccer League.[61]Bolton Wanderers climb out of the bottom three with a 3-0 home win over Sheffield United, at the expense of Birmingham City, and also confirming Ipswich Town's relegation in the process just two seasons after being champions.[62]
  • 11 April 1964 – Scotland beat England 1–0 in the British Home Championship to leave the two level on four points in the final table. Northern Ireland subsequently defeated Wales to finish level on points with the other two, thus ensuring that the title was shared between three nations. On the Football League scene, Bolton Wanderers achieve another vital win in their battle for survival as they overcome Chelsea 1-0 at Burnden Park, while second-from-bottom Birmingham City drop two vital points with a 1-0 home defeat to Stoke City. In the Second Division, Leeds United seal promotion with a 3-0 away win over Swansea Town. Sunderland's promotion celebrations are delayed when they are held to a goalless draw at Southampton, but their superior goal difference over Preston North End makes their return to the First Division a near certainty.[63]
  • 12 April 1964 – The Sunday People publishes allegations that lead to a betting scandal. It reported that Mansfield Town player Jimmy Gauld had, over several years, systematically engaged in match fixing, and that many other players were involved.
  • 13 April 1964 - Manchester United keep their First Division title hopes alive with a 2-1 home win over Sheffield United, while Tottenham Hotspur's are effectively ended by a 2-0 defeat at Sheffield Wednesday.[64]
  • 14 April 1964 - Liverpool are now within two points of clinching the First Division title after beating Burnley 3-0 at Turf Moor.[65]
  • 15 April 1964 - In the Football League Cup final first leg at the Victoria Ground, Stoke City and Leicester City draw 1-1.[66]
  • 17 April 1964 - Birmingham City slide closer to relegation from the First Division with a 5-0 away defeat to West Ham United.[67]
  • 18 April 1964 – Liverpool beat Arsenal 5–0 at Anfield to secure the title, with Manchester United's challenge ending in a 3-1 defeat at Stoke City. Bolton Wanderers squander their chance of securing First Division survival with a 1-0 defeat at Tottenham Hotspur. Sunderland's promotion to the First Division is confirmed as they defeat Charlton Athletic in front of more than 50,000 fans at Roker Park.[68]
  • 22 April 1964 - Birmingham City keep their First Division survival hopes alive with a 3-1 home win over Liverpool. Leicester City win the first major trophy of their history with a 3-2 win over Stoke City in the second leg of the Football League Cup at Filbert Street, making it a 4-3 aggregate victory over two legs.[69]
  • 22 April 1964 – Leicester City win the League Cup – their first major trophy – with a 4–3 aggregate victory over Stoke City.
  • 24 April 1964 - Bolton Wanderers lose their last First Division fixture of the season 4-0 at home to Wolves, meaning that they will be relegated if Birmingham City win their final game of the season.[70]
  • 25 April 1964 – On the final day of the Second Division season, Leeds United win 2–0 at Charlton Athletic and Sunderland fail to beat Grimsby Town, meaning Leeds were crowned champions. In the First Division, Birmingham City's 3-0 home win over Sheffield United to complete a remarkable escape from relegation and sending Bolton Wanderers down to the Second Division for the first time in 29 years.[71]
  • 2 May 1964 – West Ham United beat Preston North End 3–2 at Wembley to win the FA Cup for the first time. Trailing 2–1 at half time, West Ham scored two second half goals to deny Preston.

Notable debutantsEdit

Notable retirementsEdit

  • 5 April 1964 - Danny Blanchflower, 38-year-old Tottenham Hotspur captain.[73]

HonoursEdit

Competition Winner Runner-up
First Division Liverpool (6) Manchester United
Second Division Leeds United Sunderland
Third Division Coventry City Crystal Palace
Fourth Division Gillingham Carlisle United
FA Cup West Ham United (1) Preston North End
League Cup Leicester City (1) Stoke City
Charity Shield Everton Manchester United
Home Championship   England,   Scotland,   Northern Ireland

Notes = Number in parentheses is the times that club has won that honour. * indicates new record for competition

AwardsEdit

Football Writers' Association

Top goalscorer

Football LeagueEdit

First DivisionEdit

Liverpool clinched the First Division title just two seasons after winning promotion, finishing four points ahead of runners-up Manchester United while defending champions Everton finished third.

Tottenham Hotspur managed to finish fourth despite not winning any silverware and being without many key players for much of the season due to injury, while captain Danny Blanchflower announced his retirement from playing just before the season's end. Tragedy then struck the club after the season was over, when forward John White was struck by lightning and killed on a North London golf course.

Chelsea enjoyed a strong return to the First Division by finishing fifth, while Leicester City finally got their hands on a major trophy by winning the League Cup.

With Alf Ramsey having now left Ipswich Town to manage the England team, Ipswich Town struggled badly under his successor Jackie Milburn, and went down in bottom place having conceded 121 goals just two seasons after being league champions. Bolton Wanderers, who had gradually faded away since the retirement of centre-forward Nat Lofthouse in 1960, also went down.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GR Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Liverpool 42 26 5 11 92 45 2.044 57 Qualified for the European Cup
2 Manchester United 42 23 7 12 90 62 1.452 53 Qualified for the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup
3 Everton 42 21 10 11 84 64 1.313 52
4 Tottenham Hotspur 42 22 7 13 97 81 1.198 51
5 Chelsea 42 20 10 12 72 56 1.286 50
6 Sheffield Wednesday 42 19 11 12 84 67 1.254 49
7 Blackburn Rovers 42 18 10 14 89 65 1.369 46
8 Arsenal 42 17 11 14 90 82 1.098 45
9 Burnley 42 17 10 15 71 64 1.109 44
10 West Bromwich Albion 42 16 11 15 70 61 1.148 43
11 Leicester City 42 16 11 15 61 58 1.052 43
12 Sheffield United 42 16 11 15 61 64 0.953 43
13 Nottingham Forest 42 16 9 17 64 68 0.941 41
14 West Ham United 42 14 12 16 69 74 0.932 40
15 Fulham 42 13 13 16 58 65 0.892 39
16 Wolverhampton Wanderers 42 12 15 15 70 80 0.875 39
17 Stoke City 42 14 10 18 77 78 0.987 38
18 Blackpool 42 13 9 20 52 73 0.712 35
19 Aston Villa 42 11 12 19 62 71 0.873 34
20 Birmingham City 42 11 7 24 54 92 0.587 29
21 Bolton Wanderers 42 10 8 24 48 80 0.600 28 Relegated to the Second Division
22 Ipswich Town 42 9 7 26 56 121 0.463 25
Source: rsssf.com
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.

Second DivisionEdit

Leeds United returned to the First Division after four years away by clinching the Second Division title under ambitious manager Don Revie, while Sunderland's six-year exile from the First Division was ended by promotion as Second Division runners-up.

Grimsby Town and Scunthorpe United slipped into the Third Division.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GR Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Leeds United 42 24 15 3 71 34 2.088 63 Promoted to the First Division
2 Sunderland 42 25 11 6 81 37 2.189 61
3 Preston North End 42 23 10 9 79 54 1.463 56
4 Charlton Athletic 42 19 10 13 76 70 1.086 48
5 Southampton 42 19 9 14 100 73 1.370 47
6 Manchester City 42 18 10 14 84 66 1.273 46
7 Rotherham United 42 19 7 16 90 78 1.154 45
8 Newcastle United 42 20 5 17 74 69 1.072 45
9 Portsmouth 42 16 11 15 79 70 1.129 43
10 Middlesbrough 42 15 11 16 67 52 1.288 41
11 Northampton Town 42 16 9 17 58 60 0.967 41
12 Huddersfield Town 42 15 10 17 57 64 0.891 40
13 Derby County 42 14 11 17 56 67 0.836 39
14 Swindon Town 42 14 10 18 57 69 0.826 38
15 Cardiff City 42 14 10 18 56 81 0.691 38
16 Leyton Orient 42 13 10 19 54 72 0.750 36
17 Norwich City 42 11 13 18 64 80 0.800 35
18 Bury 42 13 9 20 57 73 0.781 35
19 Swansea Town 42 12 9 21 63 74 0.851 33
20 Plymouth Argyle 42 8 16 18 45 67 0.672 32
21 Grimsby Town 42 9 14 19 47 75 0.627 32 Relegated to the Third Division
22 Scunthorpe United 42 10 10 22 52 82 0.634 30
Source: rsssf.com
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.

Third DivisionEdit

Coventry City made the breakthrough into the Second Division as champions of the Third Division, finishing level on points at the top of the league with Crystal Palace.

Notts County, Wrexham, Crewe Alexandra and Millwall were all relegated to the Fourth Division.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GR Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Coventry City 46 22 16 8 98 61 1.607 60 Promoted to the Second Division
2 Crystal Palace 46 23 14 9 73 51 1.431 60
3 Watford 46 23 12 11 79 59 1.339 58
4 Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic 46 24 8 14 79 58 1.362 56
5 Bristol City 46 20 15 11 84 64 1.313 55
6 Reading 46 21 10 15 79 62 1.274 52
7 Mansfield Town 46 20 11 15 76 62 1.226 51
8 Hull City 46 16 17 13 73 68 1.074 49
9 Oldham Athletic 46 20 8 18 73 70 1.043 48
10 Peterborough United 46 18 11 17 75 70 1.071 47
11 Shrewsbury Town 46 18 11 17 73 80 0.913 47
12 Bristol Rovers 46 19 8 19 91 79 1.152 46
13 Port Vale 46 16 14 16 53 49 1.082 46
14 Southend United 46 15 15 16 77 78 0.987 45
15 Queens Park Rangers 46 18 9 19 76 78 0.974 45
16 Brentford 46 15 14 17 87 80 1.088 44
17 Colchester United 46 12 19 15 70 68 1.029 43
18 Luton Town 46 16 10 20 64 80 0.800 42
19 Walsall 46 13 14 19 59 76 0.776 40
20 Barnsley 46 12 15 19 68 94 0.723 39
21 Millwall 46 14 10 22 53 67 0.791 38 Relegated to the Fourth Division
22 Crewe Alexandra 46 11 12 23 50 77 0.649 34
23 Wrexham 46 13 6 27 75 107 0.701 32
24 Notts County 46 9 9 28 45 92 0.489 27
Source: rsssf.com
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.

Fourth DivisionEdit

Gillingham finished champions of the Fourth Division, ahead of runners-up Carlisle United on goal average. They enjoyed a narrow lead over third placed Workington and fourth placed Exeter City. Bradford City bounced back from having to apply for re-election to just missing out on promotion in the space of a season.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GR Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Gillingham 46 23 14 9 59 30 1.967 60 Promoted to the Third Division
2 Carlisle United 46 25 10 11 113 58 1.948 60
3 Workington 46 24 11 11 76 52 1.462 59
4 Exeter City 46 20 18 8 62 37 1.676 58
5 Bradford City 46 25 6 15 76 62 1.226 56
6 Torquay United 46 20 11 15 80 54 1.481 51
7 Tranmere Rovers 46 20 11 15 85 73 1.164 51
8 Brighton & Hove Albion 46 19 12 15 71 52 1.365 50
9 Aldershot 46 19 10 17 83 78 1.064 48
10 Halifax Town 46 17 14 15 77 77 1.000 48
11 Lincoln City 46 19 9 18 67 75 0.893 47
12 Chester 46 19 8 19 65 60 1.083 46
13 Bradford Park Avenue 46 18 9 19 75 81 0.926 45
14 Doncaster Rovers 46 15 12 19 70 75 0.933 42
15 Newport County 46 17 8 21 64 73 0.877 42
16 Chesterfield 46 15 12 19 57 71 0.803 42
17 Stockport County 46 15 12 19 50 68 0.735 42
18 Oxford United 46 14 13 19 59 63 0.937 41
19 Darlington 46 14 12 20 66 93 0.710 40
20 Rochdale 46 12 15 19 56 59 0.949 39
21 Southport 46 15 9 22 63 88 0.716 39 Re-elected
22 York City 46 14 7 25 52 66 0.788 35
23 Hartlepools United 46 12 9 25 54 93 0.581 33
24 Barrow 46 6 18 22 51 93 0.548 30
Source: rsssf.com
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.

Top goalscorersEdit

First Division

Second Division

Third Division

Fourth Division

European club competitionsEdit

European Champions' CupEdit

UEFA Cup Winners' CupEdit

Inter-Cities Fairs CupEdit

National teamEdit

The England national football team had an eventful season with a shared victory in the 1964 British Home Championship, another success against a Rest of the World XI in one of the most famous matches ever played at Wembley and a tour of the Americas upon the season's conclusion which culminated in a dire performance in Brazil during the 1964 Taça de Nações.

American tourEdit


Taça das Nações



Other matchesEdit

Date Opposition Venue Competition Result Score
12 Oct 1963   Wales Ninian Park, Cardiff British Championship Won 4–0
23 Oct 1963 Rest of the World XI Wembley Friendly Won 2–1
20 Nov 1963   Northern Ireland Wembley British Championship Won 8–3
11 April 1964   Scotland Hampden Park, Glasgow British Championship Lost 0–1
6 May 1964   Uruguay Wembley Friendly Won 2–1
17 May 1964   Portugal Estádio Nacional, Lisbon Friendly Won 4–3
24 May 1964   Republic of Ireland Dalymount Park, Dublin Friendly Won 3–1

ReferencesEdit

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