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Coordinates: 46°43′34″N 117°01′05″W / 46.726°N 117.018°W / 46.726; -117.018

1962 Idaho Vandals football
Idaho Vandals logo.svg
ConferenceIndependent
1962 record2–6–1
Head coachDee Andros (1st season)
Defensive coordinatorSteve Musseau (1st season)
Home stadiumNeale Stadium
Seasons
← 1961
1963 →
1962 NCAA University Division independents football records
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Memphis State         8 1 0
Oregon State         9 2 0
No. 9 Penn State         9 2 0
West Texas State         9 2 0
Boston College         8 2 0
Utah State         8 2 0
Villanova         7 3 0
Buffalo         6 3 0
Oregon         6 3 1
Houston         7 4 0
Miami (FL)         7 4 0
Army         6 4 0
Holy Cross         6 4 0
Louisville         6 4 0
Xavier         6 4 0
Florida State         4 3 3
Air Force         5 5 0
Montana         5 5 0
Navy         5 5 0
Notre Dame         5 5 0
Pacific (CA)         5 5 0
Pittsburgh         5 5 0
Rutgers         5 5 0
Syracuse         5 5 0
Texas Western         4 5 0
New Mexico State         4 6 0
Colgate         3 5 1
Idaho         2 6 1
San Jose State         2 8 1
Boston University         2 7 0
Dayton         2 8 0
Detroit         1 8 0
Hardin–Simmons         1 9 0
Colorado State         0 10 0
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1962 Idaho Vandals football team represented the University of Idaho in the 1962 NCAA University Division football season. The Vandals were led by first-year head coach Dee Andros and were an independent in the NCAA's University Division. Home games were played on campus at Neale Stadium in Moscow, with one in Boise at old Bronco Stadium at Boise Junior College.

The Vandals suffered an eighth straight loss in the Battle of the Palouse with neighbor Washington State, falling 14–22 in the wet snow at Neale Stadium in Moscow in the season finale on November 17.[1][2] The rivalry game with Montana for the Little Brown Stein was played in Missoula and won by the Grizzlies.[3]

Although Idaho was a charter member of the new Big Sky Conference the following year, it did not participate in football until 1965, and was an independent from 1959 through 1964. Three of the four future Big Sky opponents were on the schedule in 1962: Montana, Montana State, and Idaho State.

This was the last Vandal football season with only nine games scheduled. The following year had ten, but the last was cancelled due to the assassination of President Kennedy. Idaho first played a ten-game schedule in 1959, and it resumed in 1964.

ScheduleEdit

DateTimeOpponentSiteResultAttendance
September 222:00 pmvs. Utah StateL 7–458,500
September 291:30 pmIdaho StateW 9–68,440
October 612:30 pmat MontanaL 16–22
October 137:00 pmat San Jose StateT 12–122,500
October 201:00 pmat Montana StateL 15–337,400
October 2712:30 pmat UtahL 21–2511,320
November 37:00 pmat ArizonaW 14–1220,000
November 101:30 pmOregon State 
  • Neale Stadium
  • Moscow, Idaho
L 0–329,500
November 171:30 pmWashington State
L 14–2212,000

All-CoastEdit

No Vandals made the All-Coast team or the second team; honorable mention was guard Denny Almquist.[6][7][8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Washington State tops Idaho 22-14 on late touchdown". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Idaho. Associated Press. November 18, 1962. p. 8.
  2. ^ a b "WSU halts Idaho, 22-14". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. Associated Press. November 18, 1962. p. 4B.
  3. ^ a b "Last-minute Vandal rally fails as Montana triumphs". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Idaho. Associated Press. October 7, 1962. p. 9.
  4. ^ "Utah State whips Vandals 45-7; fumbles hurt Idaho". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Idaho. Associated Press. September 23, 1962. p. 8.
  5. ^ "Idaho, San Jose play to muddy tie". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Idaho. Associated Press. October 14, 1962. p. 10.
  6. ^ "All-Coast lineups". Spokane Daily Chronicle. (Washington). Associated Press. December 4, 1962. p. 17.
  7. ^ "Trio from Oregon gain All-Coast". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. December 4, 1962. p. 3B.
  8. ^ "WSU's Campbell repeats as All-Coast end". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. December 5, 1962. p. 10.

External linksEdit