1930 in film

The following is an overview of 1930 in film, including significant events, a list of films released and notable births and deaths.

List of years in film (table)
In television
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933

Top-grossing filmsEdit

The top ten 1930 released films by box office gross in North America are as follows:

Highest-grossing films of 1930
Rank Title Studio Box office gross rental
1 Whoopee! United Artists/Samuel Goldwyn Productions $2,655,000[1]
2 Check and Double Check RKO Radio Pictures $1,751,000[2]
3 All Quiet on the Western Front Universal Pictures $1,634,000[2]
4 Hell's Angels United Artists $1,600,000[3]
5 The Big House Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer $1,300,000[4]
6 Common Clay Fox Film Corporation $1,246,000[2]
7 Min and Bill Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer $1,223,000[4]
8 Song o' My Heart Fox Film Corporation $1,200,000[5]
9 Son of the Gods Warner Bros. $1,069,000[6]
10 Animal Crackers Paramount Pictures $1,050,000[2]

EventsEdit

  • February 23: Silent screen legend Mabel Normand dies at the age of 37 in Monrovia, California after a lengthy battle with tuberculosis.
  • March 10: Release of Goodbye Argentina (Adiós Argentina), the first Argentine film with a (musical) soundtrack. Ada Cornaro has her first starring role and Libertad Lamarque makes her film debut.
  • April 6: William Fox sells his interest in Fox Film for $18 million and Harley L. Clarke becomes president.[7][8]
  • May 27: Howard Hughes' epic film Hell's Angels premieres at Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Hollywood and features Jean Harlow in her first major role as well as some impressive aerial sequences. Although not a financial success upon its release, the film is acclaimed by critics and launches Harlow as one of the 1930s' biggest stars.
  • September 3: The Hollywood Reporter is first published.
  • September 19: The Love Parade receives a record six Academy Award nominations.
  • November 1: The Big Trail featuring a young John Wayne in his first starring role is released in both 35mm and a very early form of 70mm film. It is the first large scale big-budget film of the sound era, costing over $2 million. The film is praised for its aesthetic quality and realism that will not become commonplace until many decades later. However, due to the new film format and the film's release during the Great Depression, the film will go on to become a financial failure at the box office.

Academy AwardsEdit

Notable films released in 1930Edit

United States unless stated

AEdit

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DEdit

EEdit

FEdit

GEdit

HEdit

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J-KEdit

LEdit

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N-OEdit

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U-VEdit

W-YEdit

SerialsEdit

Short film seriesEdit

Animated short film seriesEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

Film debutsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jones, Lon (March 4, 1944). "Which Cinema Films Have Earned the Most Money Since 1914?". The Argus. Melbourne. p. 3 Supplement: The Argus Weekend magazine. Retrieved August 6, 2012 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ a b c d "All-Time Film Rental Champs". Variety. October 15, 1990. p. M150.
  3. ^ Eyman, Scott (1997). The Speed of Sound: Hollywood and the Talkie Revolution 1926-1930. ISBN 978-0-6848-1162-8. Hell's Angels was a financial disaster, grossing $1.6 million domestically, with another million coming in from foreign markets.
  4. ^ a b The Eddie Mannix Ledger, Los Angeles, California: Margaret Herrick Library, Center for Motion Picture Study.
  5. ^ Finler, Joel Waldo (2003). The Hollywood Story. Wallflower Press. pp. 356–357. ISBN 978-1-903364-66-6.
  6. ^ Warner Bros financial information in The William Shaefer Ledger. See Appendix 1, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, (1995) 15:sup1, 1-31 p 10 DOI: 10.1080/01439689508604551
  7. ^ "Fox Controversy is Settled". The Film Daily. April 7, 1930. p. 1. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  8. ^ "The Fox Reorganization". Variety. April 9, 1930. p. 3. Retrieved May 8, 2018.