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IncumbentsEdit

EventsEdit

January–FebruaryEdit

March–AprilEdit

  • 22 March – senior officer Rory O'Connor declares that the Irish Republican Army will no longer obey Dáil Éireann.
  • 1 April
    • The British Government orders the release of all Irish prisoners in British prisons convicted of sedition.
    • The Irish Post Office takes over responsibility for its own operations.
  • 26–28 April – Dunmanway killings: Thirteen Protestant men, suspected of involvement as or with informants to the British Army, are killed in and around Dunmanway, County Cork.[4]
  • 14 April – Rory O'Connor, with 200 other anti-Treaty Irish Republican Army men under his command, occupies the Four Courts building in the centre of Dublin in defiance of the Provisional Government.
  • 26 April – the Irish Catholic Church hierarchy implores the people of Ireland to accept the Treaty and to make the best of the freedom which it brings.

May–JuneEdit

 
30 June – the Four Courts on fire during the Battle of Dublin.

July–AugustEdit

September–OctoberEdit

  • 9 September – the first meeting of the Provisional Parliament, or the Third Dáil, takes place at Leinster House. W. T. Cosgrave is elected President of Dáil Éireann and Chairman of the Provisional Government.
  • 17 September – W. T. Cosgrave introduces the Constitution of Saorstát Éireann Bill to enable the implementation of the Treaty between Great Britain and Ireland.
  • 16 October – two men, James Ambrose and Daniel King, are killed by shots fired into a car traveling from Newcastle West to Ballyquirk, Limerick.[8]
  • 26 October – the standing committee of Sinn Féin last meets before the party de facto dissolves.[9]

November–DecemberEdit

See also Timeline of the Irish Civil War

Arts and literatureEdit

SportEdit

FootballEdit

Gaelic GamesEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 491–493. ISBN 0-304-35730-8. 
  2. ^ Lynch, Robert (2009). "The Clones affray, 1922 – massacre or invasion?". History Ireland. Retrieved 2012-12-21. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Cottrell, Peter (2009). The War for Ireland, 1913–1923. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84603-9966. 
  4. ^ Cottrell, Peter (2006). The Anglo-Irish War: The Troubles of 1913–1922. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. pp. 70–2. ISBN 978-1-84603-023-9. Retrieved 2010-10-31. 
  5. ^ Ref 01512 Fermanagh County Museum.
  6. ^ "A Concise History of the Irish Air Corps". Óglaigh na hÉireann. Retrieved 2012-08-23. 
  7. ^ Parkhouse, Neil (March 2013). "The IRA attack on the viaducts at Ballyvoile". Railway Archive. 38: 55–66. 
  8. ^ "The Tragedy Near Newcastle West" (PDF). The Limerick Chronicle. 1922-10-26. Retrieved 2015-11-13. 
  9. ^ Laffan, Michael (1999). The Resurrection of Ireland: The Sinn Féin Party, 1916–1923. Cambridge University Press. p. 417. ISBN 9781139426299. Retrieved 2015-10-11.