1892 World Series

The 1892 World Series followed the first split season in National League history, with the first-half champion Boston Beaneaters (102–48) playing the second-half champion Cleveland Spiders (93–56) in a best-of-nine postseason series to determine the overall champion of the 1892 baseball season. After the first game ended in a 0–0 tie due to darkness, Boston won the next five games to win the championship.

1892 World Series
NL: Boston Beaneaters (5–0–1)
NL: Cleveland Spiders (0–5–1)
The 1892 Cleveland Spiders

Contemporary newspaper reports referred to the games as the "world's championship series"[1] or "World's Series".[2] This was the last of the pre-modern-era World Series, and followed similar annual postseason competitions held from 1884 to 1890 between the champions of the National League and the American Association (which collapsed after the 1891 season). Later, the Temple Cup would be awarded to the winner of an annual postseason series between National League teams, from 1894 to 1897.

BackgroundEdit

Boston manager Frank Selee worried that late-October weather conditions would lead to postponements and low attendance. Cleveland's player-manager Patsy Tebeau suggested that “the [Boston] Beaneaters fear the humiliation of possible defeat.” Tebeau told Sporting Life that the cold weather was a "dodge … simply an excuse to avoid playing Cleveland."[3]

Bookies had the Spiders as the favorite, due to their pitching staff. Cy Young had gone 36–12 in 49 starts, with a 1.93 earned-run average.[4] Meanwhile, Boston star Mike "King" Kelly had a batting average of only .189 for the year,[5] and was described as "one of the biggest failures of the base ball season."[3]

Series summaryEdit

Boston won the series, 5–0–1.

Game Date Score Location
1 October 17 Boston – 0, Cleveland – 0 (11) League Park, Cleveland
2 October 18 Boston – 4, Cleveland – 3 League Park, Cleveland
3 October 19 Boston – 3, Cleveland – 2 League Park, Cleveland
4 October 21 Cleveland – 0, Boston – 4 South End Grounds, Boston
5 October 22 Cleveland – 7, Boston – 12 South End Grounds, Boston
6 October 24 Cleveland – 3, Boston – 8 South End Grounds, Boston

Hugh Duffy of Boston batted .462 with nine runs batted in and six extra-base hits including a home run.[6]

Had the series required more than six games to complete, the remaining games would have been played in New York City.[7]

Game summariesEdit

Game 1Edit

The first game, which had started at three o'clock, had gone 11 scoreless innings when it was stopped at five o'clock due to darkness.

October 17 (Monday) at League Park, Cleveland
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 R H E
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0
Cleveland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1
Starting pitchers:
BOS: Jack Stivetts
CLE: Cy Young
Attendance: 5,800 to 6,000
Notes: Game duration 2:00
Game called on account of darkness.
Umpires: Pop Snyder and Bob Emslie[8][9]

Game 2Edit

October 18 (Tuesday) at League Park, Cleveland
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Boston 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 4 10 2
Cleveland 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 10 2
WP: Harry Staley (1–0)   LP: John Clarkson (0–1)
Attendance: 6,700 to 7,500
Notes: Game duration 1:35
Umpires: Jack McQuaid and John Gaffney[10][11]

Game 3Edit

October 19 (Wednesday) at League Park, Cleveland
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Boston 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 9 2
Cleveland 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 0
WP: Jack Stivetts (1–0)   LP: Cy Young (0–1)
Attendance: 7,500
Notes: Game duration 1:50
Umpires: Bob Emslie and Pop Snyder[12][13][14]

Game 4Edit

After a travel day for the teams, the series moved to Boston with the Beaneaters leading, two games to none.

October 21 (Friday) at South End Grounds, Boston
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cleveland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3
Boston 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 X 4 6 0
WP: Kid Nichols (1–0)   LP: Nig Cuppy (0–1)
Home runs:
CLE: None
BOS: Hugh Duffy
Attendance: 6,547
Notes: Game duration 1:48
Umpires: John Gaffney and Jack McQuaid[15][16]

Game 5Edit

John Clarkson started for Cleveland in place of Cy Young, who complained of a "lame arm".

October 22 (Saturday) at South End Grounds, Boston
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cleveland 0 6 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 9 4
Boston 0 0 0 3 2 4 3 0 X 12 14 3
WP: Jack Stivetts (2–0)   LP: John Clarkson (0–2)
Home runs:
CLE: John Clarkson
BOS: Tommy Tucker
Attendance: 3,400
Notes: Game duration 1:50
Umpires: Pop Snyder and Bob Emslie[17][18]

Game 6Edit

After an off-day (professional baseball games were not allowed on Sundays in Boston until 1929)[19] the Beaneaters won their fifth game of the series to capture the championship. The 13 players on their roster split $1000 prize money.

October 24 (Monday) at South End Grounds, Boston
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cleveland 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 10 4
Boston 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 X 8 11 5
WP: Kid Nichols (2–0)   LP: Cy Young (0–2)
Home runs:
CLE: None
BOS: Charlie Bennett
Notes: Game duration 1:55
Umpires: Jack McQuaid and John Gaffney[20][21]

AftermathEdit

The National League abolished the split season format for 1893,[3] and did not play another split season until 1981, which was caused by a players' strike.

Multiple participants in the series were later inducted to the National Baseball Hall of Fame:

John Clarkson had started the season with the Beaneaters, and signed with the Spiders after being released at the end of June. Pitcher Lee Viau also played for both Boston and Cleveland during 1892.

The Beaneaters were later known as the Doves (1907–1910) and the Rustlers (1911) before adopting the nickname of "Braves" in 1912. The franchise relocated to Milwaukee in 1953, and then moved to Atlanta in 1966, where they remain members of the National League as the Atlanta Braves. The Spiders' final season was 1899, when they compiled a record of 20–134 (establishing a longstanding record for the worst major league season) after ownership moved their best players to the St. Louis Cardinals, and were one of four teams contracted out of the National League when the league reduced its size to eight teams prior to the 1900 season.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Base Ball Briefs". The Pittsburgh Press. October 20, 1892. p. 5. Retrieved April 5, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "World's Series: Boston Gets First Blood". The Cincinnati Enquirer. October 19, 1892. p. 2. Retrieved April 5, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b c Gottschall, Terry. "October 1892: The Split-Season Playoff". SABR.
  4. ^ "Cy Young Stats". Baseball-Reference.com.
  5. ^ "King Kelly Stats". Baseball-Reference.com.
  6. ^ "1892 World Series - Boston Beaneaters over Cleveland Spiders (5-0-1)". Baseball-Reference.com.
  7. ^ "Baseball (column)". Los Angeles Times. October 14, 1892. p. 4. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "A Great Baseball Game: Boston and Cleveland Played a "Tie" Contest". The New York Times. October 18, 1892. p. 9. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "A Great Game: Contest For the League Baseball Championship". Newton Daily Republican. Newton, Kansas. October 18, 1892. p. 1. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ "By a Single Tally: Boston Secures the First Championship Contest". Chicago Tribune. October 19, 1892. p. 6. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "The Bostons Win: A Close Game with the Clevelands at Cleveland". Brooklyn Citizen. October 19, 1892. p. 3. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Boston Wins Again". Los Angeles Times. October 20, 1892. p. 2. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "Bostons Score Again". Tyrone Daily Herald. Tyrone, Pennsylvania. October 20, 1892. p. 1. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ "Looks Like Boston: The Bean Eaters Almost Sure of Winning the Championship". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. October 20, 1892. p. 2. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ "Baseball: Boston Has Won Three Games of the World's Championship Series". The Standard Union. Brooklyn. October 22, 1892. p. 8. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ "Baseball: Cleveland Whitewashed in the Match With Boston Yesterday". The Winnipeg Tribune. October 22, 1892. p. 7. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ "Downed Them Again: The Bostons Get Another Game From the Clevelands in Easy Style". Pittsburgh Dispatch. October 23, 1892. p. 6. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ "National League: Boston 12, Cleveland 8 (sic)". The Times-Picayune. New Orleans. October 23, 1892. p. 8. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ Ruzzo, Bob. "April 28, 1929: Red Sox fall in first official Sunday game in Boston". SABR. Retrieved September 18, 2019.
  20. ^ "The Boston Braves: They Beat the Clevelands in Five Straight Games and Win The World's Pennant". Pittsburgh Dispatch. October 25, 1892. p. 9. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. ^ "Bostons Win: The Bean-eaters Take the Closing Game with Cleveland". Los Angeles Times. AP. October 25, 1892. p. 1. Retrieved April 8, 2021 – via newspapers.com. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External linksEdit