1830 in paleontology

Paleontology or palaeontology is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils.[1] This includes the study of body fossils, tracks (ichnites), burrows, cast-off parts, fossilised feces (coprolites), palynomorphs and chemical residues. Because humans have encountered fossils for millennia, paleontology has a long history both before and after becoming formalized as a science. This article records significant discoveries and events related to paleontology that occurred or were published in the year 1830.

List of years in paleontology (table)
In science
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833

ArchosauromorphsEdit

Newly named basal archosauromorphsEdit

Taxon Novelty Status Author(s) Age Unit Location Notes Images
Protorosaurus[2] Gen. nov. Valid Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer Guadalupian, 260–251 mya Pirambola Formation   Germany,   UK One of the most primitive archosauromorphs. Previously considered to be related to Prolacerta within Prolacertiformes, but now a new genus shows that they were in fact not closely related.[3]

 

DinosaursEdit

Newly named dinosaursEdit

Data courtesy of George Olshevsky's dinosaur genera list.[4]

Taxon Novelty Status Author(s) Age Unit Location Notes Images
Streptospondylus[2] Gen. nov. Nomen dubium Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer Oxfordian, 161 mya Vaches Noires, Chipping Norton   France The remains of Streptospondylus were the first dinosaurian remains to be described (by Cuvier in 1808), however, their identification was thought to be teleosaurid or metriorhynchid.[5]  

CrocodylomorphsEdit

Newly named crocodylomorphsEdit

Taxon Novelty Status Author(s) Age Unit Location Notes Images
Aeolodon[2] Gen. nov. Valid Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) Solnhofen Formation   Germany A teleosaurid.

 

Macrospondylus[2] Gen. nov. Junior synonym Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer Toarcian to Berriasian, 183–142 mya Oxford Clay Formation, Kimmeridge Clay, Holzmaden, Monheim, Hondelage   England,   France,   Germany,    Switzerland,   Madagascar Now considered a junior synonym of Steneosaurus. Steneosaurus is known from many species that existed from the Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, which form a monophyletic group when S. pictaviensis and S. megarhinus are excluded.[6]

 

Metriorhynchus[2] Gen. nov. Valid Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer Callovian to Kimmeridgian, 167–155 mya Oxford Clay Formation, Kimmeridge Clay, La Voulte-sur-Rhône (lagerstätte)   England,   France,   Germany,    Switzerland Many species have been referred to Metriorhynchus since 1830, yet recent studies show that only three species are valid and referrable to the genus, the type M. geoffroyii, M. superciliosus, and M. hastifer.[7]

 

FishEdit

Newly named fishEdit

Taxon Novelty Status Author(s) Age Unit Location Notes Images
Lepidosaurus[2] Gen. nov. Junior synonym Christian Erich Hermann von Meyer Toarcian, 150 mya[8] Whitby, Holzmaden, Dobbertin, La Caine[8]   England,   France,   Germany This genus is now considered a junior synonym of Lepidotes. Although previously known from species ranging between 205 and 100 mya, a 2012 study found only species from the Late Jurassic to be in the genus, and reassigned the rest.[8]

 

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gini-Newman, Garfield; Graham, Elizabeth (2001). Echoes from the past: world history to the 16th century. Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd. ISBN 9780070887398. OCLC 46769716.
  2. ^ a b c d e f von Meyer, H. (1830). von Oken, Isis (ed.). "Achte Versammlung der Naturforscher und Ärzte zu Heidelberg": 517–519. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. ^ Borsuk–Białynicka, M.; Evans, S.E. (2009). "A long–necked archosauromorph from the Early Triassic of Poland" (PDF). Palaeontologia Polonica. 65: 203–234.
  4. ^ Olshevsky, George. "Dinogeorge's Dinosaur Genera List". Retrieved 2008-08-07.
  5. ^ Cuvier, G. (1808). "Sur les ossements fossiles de crocodiles et particulièrement sur ceux des environs du Havre et d'Honfleur, avec des remarques sur les squelettes de sauriens de la Thuringe". Annales du Muséum d'Histoire naturelle de Paris. 7: 73–110.
  6. ^ Mueller-Töwe, I.J. (2005). "Phylogenetic relationships of the Thalattosuchia" (PDF). Zitteliana. A45: 211–213.
  7. ^ Cau, A.; Fanti, F. (2010). "The oldest known metriorhynchid crocodylian from the Middle Jurassic of North-eastern Italy: Neptunidraco ammoniticus gen. et sp. nov". Gondwana Research. 19 (2): 550–565. Bibcode:2011GondR..19..550C. doi:10.1016/j.gr.2010.07.007.
  8. ^ a b c López-Arbarello, A. (2012). "Phylogenetic Interrelationships of Ginglymodian Fishes (Actinopterygii: Neopterygii)". PLoS ONE. 7 (7): e39370. Bibcode:2012PLoSO...739370L. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0039370. PMC 3394768. PMID 22808031.