This article concerns the period 139 BC – 130 BC.

Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

EventsEdit

139 BC

By placeEdit

ChinaEdit
  • Emperor Wu of Han sends the diplomat Zhang Qian west to form an alliance with the Yuezhi against the Xiongnu. Wu does this after learning from Xiongnu defectors that the Xiongnu had defeated and killed the king of the Yuezhi, had expelled the Yuezhi from their lands and were using their king's skull as a wine goblet. The Yuezhi had subsequently migrated further west.
  • Soon after his departure for the west, Zhang Qian is detained by Junchen Chanyu of the Xiongnu. He would remain in Xiongnu custody for more than ten years and would be given a Xiongnu wife.[1]
  • Wei Zifu enters Emperor Wu's palace as a concubine and becomes pregnant. Enraged, Liu Piao, the mother of the childless Empress Chen Jiao (wife of Emperor Wu), kidnaps Zifu's brother Wei Qing, who is rescued by Gongsun Ao. Wu responds by advancing the careers of members of the Wei family.[2]
Roman RepublicEdit

By topicEdit

AstronomyEdit

138 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
Asia MinorEdit
EgyptEdit
SyriaEdit
ParthiaEdit
ChinaEdit
  • Grand Empress Dowager Dou, the grandmother of Emperor Wu of Han, purges the high administration of officials to consolidate her power. Among those dismissed are Prime Minister Dou Yong and her own half-brother, the General-in-Chief Tian Fen. Two of the young emperor's closest advisors, Zhao Wan and Wang Zang, are arrested and commit suicide.[3]

By topicEdit

Arts and sciencesEdit

137 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit

136 BCEdit

By placeEdit

ChinaEdit
GreeceEdit
JudaeaEdit
RomeEdit
SpainEdit

135 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
BactriaEdit
ChinaEdit

134 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
JudeaEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

AstronomyEdit

133 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
ChinaEdit
  • June – A large army of the Han Dynasty, under the overall command of Han Anguo, attempts to ambush the Xiongnu leader Junchen Chanyu in the Battle of Mayi. By pretending to betray the city of Mayi, a Han official had lured Junchen onto Han soil. However, a captured Chinese officer tips off Junchen, and so he avoids the ambush. The episode abrogates the Xiongnu-Han treaty (called heqin 和親 or "harmonious kinship") and marks the beginning of Emperor Wu's Han-Xiongnu War.
  • Foreign Minister Wang Hui, who, against the opposition of Han Anguo, had advocated for war, fails to attack the retreating supply column of the Xiongnu and is sentenced to death. He commits suicide.[13]

132 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
MexicoEdit

131 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit

130 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
EgyptEdit
ChinaEdit

BirthsEdit

138 BC

135 BC

134 BC

132 BC

130 BC

DeathsEdit

139 BC

138 BC

137 BC

135 BC

134 BC

133 BC

132 BC

130 BC

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 144–145. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  2. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. p. 132. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  3. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 123–124. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  4. ^ "World History 200- 100 BC". Retrieved 28 June 2010.
  5. ^ Smith, William (1870). Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology. Vol. 2. Boston, Little. p. 155.
  6. ^ T. Corey Brennan, The praetorship in the Roman Republic (2000) p. 229
  7. ^ Papazoglu 1978, p. 286
  8. ^ Livy (2007). Rome's Mediterranean Empire: Books 41-45 and the Periochae. Oxford University Press. pp. 268. ISBN 978-0-19-160539-0.
  9. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. p. 124. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  10. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 183–185. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  11. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 124–125. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  12. ^ Davis, Paul (2001). Besieged: An Encyclopedia of Great Sieges from Ancient Times to the Present. ABC-CLIO. p. 29.
  13. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 127–131. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  14. ^ "132 BC". Farlex. Archived from the original on February 24, 2012.
  15. ^ Cambridge Ancient History VII p. 380.
  16. ^ Cambridge Ancient History IX p. 780.
  17. ^ Cambridge Ancient History IX p. 313.
  18. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. p. 135. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  19. ^ Marvin Perry et al., eds. Western Civilization: Ideas, Politics, and Society (Cengage Learning, 2008) p135
  20. ^ Mayor, Adrienne: "The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy" Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009, ISBN 978-0-691-12683-8
  21. ^ Duggan, Alfred: He Died Old: Mithradates Eupator, King of Pontus, 1958
  22. ^ Ford, Michael Curtis: The Last King: Rome's Greatest Enemy, New York, Thomas Dunne Books, 2004, ISBN 0-312-27539-0
  23. ^ McGing, B.C.: The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus (Mnemosyne, Supplements: 89), Leiden, Brill Academic Publishers, 1986, ISBN 90-04-07591-7 [paperback]
  24. ^ Paranavitana, Senarat; Nicholas, Cyril Wace (1961). A Concise History of Ceylon. Colombo: Ceylon University Press. p. 59. OCLC 465385.
  25. ^ de Silva, C.R.: Sri Lanka - A History. 2nd edition, New Delhi 1997. ISBN 81-259-0461-1. p.29f.
  26. ^ Catholic Bible resources
  27. ^ Hansen, Esther V. (1971). The Attalids of Pergamon. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press; London: Cornell University Press Ltd. ISBN 0-8014-0615-3.
  28. ^ Kosmetatou, Elizabeth (2003) "The Attalids of Pergamon," in Andrew Erskine, ed., A Companion to the Hellenistic World. Oxford: Blackwell: pp. 159–174. ISBN 1-4051-3278-7. text
  29. ^ Simon Hornblower and Tony Spawforth, Who's Who (Classical World), pg. 61.

BibliographyEdit