The 130s decade ran from January 1, 130, to December 31, 139.

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

EventsEdit

130

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

Arts and sciencesEdit

131Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
  • Emperor Hadrian builds the city Aelia Capitolina on the location of Jerusalem.
  • The Praetor's Edict is definitively codified by Salvius Julianus on Hadrian's orders. This change means that senatorial decrees become a mere confirmation of the imperial speech (oratio principis) which initiated them.
  • Reorganization of the Imperial Council: Central administration is reinforced, and administrative positions are entrusted to Knights according to a very strict hierarchy. Under the reorganization, the Roman Senate is excluded from controlling the business of state.
  • Hadrian restores the monarchist policy of Claudius and Domitian. The equestrian order is given full legal status and attains the second order of the state.
  • Italy is divided into legal districts managed by consuls, a direct blow to the power and prestige of the Senate.

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
  • Edict of Hadrian prohibiting the practice of circumcision. Additionally, Hadrian prohibits public reading of the Torah under penalty of death, as well as observance of festivals and the Sabbath, the teaching of Judaic Law, and the ordination of rabbis.
  • The Temple of Baalshamin is built in Palmyra.[1]

132Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit
  • Change of era name from Yongjian (7th year) to Yangjia of the Chinese Han Dynasty.

By topicEdit

Arts and sciencesEdit

133Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit

Ongoing eventsEdit

134Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ArchitectureEdit

135Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit
  • Last (4th) year of Yangjia era of the Chinese Han Dynasty.

By topicEdit

Arts and sciencesEdit

136Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

137Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit

138Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit

By topicEdit

CommerceEdit
  • The silver content of the Roman denarius falls to 75 percent under Emperor Antoninus Pius, down from 87 percent under Hadrian.

139Edit

By placeEdit

Roman EmpireEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

130

132

133

135

  • He Jin, Han Grand General (d. 189)
  • Rabbi Yehudah ha-Nasi or Judah haNasi, Talmudic scholar (according to Jewish tradition, he was born the same day Rabbi Akiva died a martyr's death) (d. 217)

137

138


DeathsEdit

130

131

132

  • Sun Cheng, eunuch at the Imperial Chinese court

133

134

135

136

137

138

139


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Javier Teixidor (2015). The Pagan God: Popular Religion in the Greco-Roman Near East. Princeton University Press. p. 132. ISBN 1400871395.
  2. ^ a b "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  3. ^ Asakura, Hironori (2003). World history of the customs and tariffs. World Customs Organization. p. 90. ISBN 978-2-87492-021-9.
  4. ^ Claridge, Amanda (2010). Rome: An Oxford Archaeological Guide. Oxford University Press. p. 411. ISBN 9780199546831.
  5. ^ Potter, D. (2009). Emperors of Rome: the story of imperial Rome from Julius Caesar to the last emperor. Quercus. p. 91. Retrieved 28 August 2018. ... So began the joint reign of Marcus Aurelius (ad 121-180) and Lucius Verus (ad 130-169), an event unparalleled in ...
  6. ^ Higham, Charles (2014). Encyclopedia of Ancient Asian Civilizations. Infobase Publishing. p. 125. ISBN 978-1-4381-0996-1.
  7. ^ Nhất Hạnh, Thích (2001). Master Tang Hôi: first Zen teacher in Vietnam and China. Parallax Press. p. 6. ISBN 978-1-888375-13-8.
  8. ^ Hardy, Grant (1999). Worlds of bronze and bamboo: Sima Qian's conquest of history. Columbia University Press. p. 193. ISBN 978-0-231-11304-5.
  9. ^ Higham, Charles (2014). Encyclopedia of Ancient Asian Civilizations. Infobase Publishing. p. 125. ISBN 978-1-4381-0996-1.
  10. ^ "Antinous". www.rct.uk. Retrieved 29 March 2019.
  11. ^ Milward, R. S. (1997). Apostles and Martyrs. Gracewing Publishing. p. 67. ISBN 978-0-85244-390-3.
  12. ^ "Zhang Heng - Chinese mathematician, astronomer, and geographer". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 11 June 2018.