1300s (decade)

(Redirected from 1300–1309)

The 1300s was a decade of the Julian Calendar that began on 1 January 1300 and ended on 31 December 1309.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

1300

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit

  • Spring – Bohemian forces under Wenceslaus II of the Czech House of Přemyslid, seize Pomerania and Greater Poland (Wielkopolska). The 28-year-old Wenceslaus rules already Lesser Poland (Małopolska) since 1291, and forced a number of Silesian princes to swear allegiance to him. He is crowned as king and reunites the Polish territories. During his reign, Wenceslaus also introduces a number of laws and reforms, the most important being the creation of a new type of official known as a starosta (or Elder), who rules a small territory as the king's direct representative.[1][2]
  • Franco–Flemish War: King Philip IV (the Fair) begins to invade Flanders again after the expiration of an armistice in January. French forces plunder and devastate the countryside around Ypres. The king's brother, Charles of Valois, marches from Bruges to the outskirts of Ghent. He burns Nevele and twelve other towns. In March, French forces besiege Damme and Ypres. At the end of April, Damme, Aardenburg and Sluis surrender. By mid-May, the whole of Flanders is under French control, and several Flemish nobles (like Guy of Namur) are taken into captivity in France.[3]
EnglandEdit
  • July – King Edward I (Longshanks) starts another Scottish campaign and marches north with his army, accompanied by several knights of Brittany and Lorraine. After a short siege lasting only 5 days, Caerlaverock Castle is captured. The 16-year-old Prince Edward of Caernarfon is appointed to take command of the rearguard of the English army but part from a small skirmish, he sees no action.[4]
  • Summer – Edward I (Longshanks) invades Galloway and confronts a Scottish army under John Comyn III (the Red) on the River Cree. During the battle, the Scottish cavalry is again defeated. Edward is unable to pursue the fugitives into the wild country, where they flee and take refuge. John escapes with his life and begins to raid the English countryside in smaller groups.[5]
  • August – Pope Boniface VIII sends a letter to Edward I (Longshanks) demanding that he should withdraw from Scotland. Edward ignores the letter, but because the campaign is not a success, the English forces begin on their home journey. Edward arranges a truce with the Scots on October 30 and returns home.
OasisamericaEdit

By topicEdit

Cities and TownsEdit
ReligionEdit

1301

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
Middle EastEdit
  • Spring – Sultan Osman I (or Othman) calls for a military campaign to strike deep into Byzantine Bithynia. During the campaign, Ottoman forces capture the towns of İnegöl and Yenişehir. The later town will be transformed into a capital city, as Osman moves his administration and personal household within its walls. By the end of the year, Ottoman forces begin blockading the major Byzantine city of Nicaea.[10]
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
  • December – Boniface VIII issues papal bulls accusing King Philip IV (the Fair) of misgovernment.

1302

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
  • Spring – Co-Emperor Michael IX (Palaiologos) launches a campaign which reaches south up to Magnesia on the Maeander (near Ephesus). He seeks to confront the Turkish forces, but is dissuaded by his generals. In the meantime, the Turks resume their raids, isolating Michael at Magnesia. His army is dissolved without a battle, as the local forces are left behind to defend their homes. The Alans (Byzantine mercenaries) too leave, to rejoin their families in Thrace. Michael is forced to withdraw by the sea, followed by another wave of refugees.[12]
  • July 27Battle of Bapheus: To counter the Turkish threat at Nicomedia, Emperor Andronikos II (Palaiologos) sends a Byzantine force (some 2,000 men) to cross over the Bosporus to relieve the city. On the plain, Turkish forces (some 5,000 light cavalry) led by Sultan Osman I (or Othman) defeat the Byzantines, who are forced to withdraw to Nicomedia. After the battle, Andronikos loses control of the countryside of Bithynia, withdrawing to the forts. Meanwhile, Turkish forces capture Byzantine settlements, such as the coastal city of Gemlik.[13][14]
  • October 4 – Andronikos II (Palaiologos) signs a peace treaty with the Republic of Venice, ending the Byzantine–Venetian War. The Venetians return most of their conquests – but keep the islands of Kea, Santorini, Serifos and Amorgos – which are retained by the privateers who have captured them. Andronikos agrees to repay the Venetians for their losses sustained during the massacre of Venetian residents (see 1296).[15]
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • Spring – King Edward I (Longshanks) and the Scottish nobles led by Robert the Bruce sign a peace treaty for 9 months. John Segrave is appointed to the custody of Berwick Castle, leaving him in charge with an English force of some 20,000 men. Robert, along with other nobles, gives his allegiance to Edward.[21]
  • March – Robert the Bruce marries the 18-year-old Elizabeth de Burgh at Writtle in Essex. She is the daughter of Richard Óg de Burgh (the Red Earl), a powerful Irish nobleman and close friend of Edward I (Longshanks).
LevantEdit

By topicEdit

Cities and TownsEdit
ReligionEdit

1303

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
  • April 4Battle of Arques: Flemish forces (some 10,000 men) led by William of Jülich (the Younger) defeats a French army at Arques in Flanders. During the battle, the French cavalry (1,600 men) tries to break the Flemish infantry militia formations, but to no avail. Finally, the French withdraw to Saint-Omer, leaving 300 dead behind. Later, William receives a warm reception in Bruges as a liberator in May.[24]

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1304

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1305

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1306

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1307

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1308

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1309

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

1300

1301

1302

1303

1304

1305

1306

1307

1308

1309

DeathsEdit

1300

1301

1302

1303

1304

1305

 
William Wallace

1306

1307

1308

1309

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Richard Brzezinski (1998). History of Poland: Old Poland – The Piast Dynasty, p. 24. ISBN 83-7212-019-6.
  2. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History, p. 152. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  3. ^ Strayer, Joseph (1980). The Reign of Philip the Fair, pp. 10–11. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-10089-0.
  4. ^ Phillips, Seymour (2011). Edward II, pp. 82–84. New Haven, CT & London, UK: Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-17802-9.
  5. ^ Armstrong, Pete (2003). Osprey: Stirling Bridge & Falkirk 1297–98, p. 84. ISBN 1-84176-510-4.
  6. ^ Magazine, Smithsonian; Helmuth, Laura. "In the Cliffs of mesa Verde". Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved 2022-07-12.
  7. ^ Pfatteicher, Philip (1980). Festivals and Commemorations. Augsburg Fortress. ISBN 978-0-8066-1757-2.
  8. ^ a b Július Bartl; Dusan Skvarna (2002). Slovak History: Chronology & Lexicon. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. pp. 34–. ISBN 978-0-86516-444-4.
  9. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History, p. 153. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  10. ^ Kazhdan, Alexander (1991). The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, pp. 1539–1540. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-504652-8.
  11. ^ Satish Chandra (2007). History of Medieval India: 800–1700, p. 97. Orient Longman. ISBN 978-81-250-3226-7.
  12. ^ Nicol, Donald M. (1993). The Last Centuries of Byzantium, 1261–1453, pp. 125–126. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-43991-6.
  13. ^ Bartusis, Mark C. (1997). The Late Byzantine Army: Arms and Society 1204–1453, pp. 76–77. University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 978-0-8122-1620-2.
  14. ^ Laiou, Angeliki E. (1972). Constantinople and the Latins: Foreign Policy of Andronicus II, 1282–1328, pp. 90–91. Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-16535-9.
  15. ^ Nicol, Donald M. (1988). Byzantium and Venice: A Study in Diplomatic and Cultural Relations, pp. 217–221. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-34157-4.
  16. ^ Joseph F. O'Callaghan (2011). The Gibraltar Crusade: Castile and the Battle for the Strait, p. 118. University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 978-0-8122-2302-6.
  17. ^ Andrew Latham (2019). "Medieval Geopolitics: The Conflict between Pope Boniface VIII and King Philip IV of France". Medievalists.net.
  18. ^ Tucker, Spencer C. (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict, p. 294. Vol. 1. ISBN 978-1-85-109667-1.
  19. ^ Verbruggen, J. F. (2002). The Battle of the Golden Spurs: Courtrai, 11 July 1302, p. 192. Woodbridge: Boydell Press. ISBN 978-0-85115-888-4.
  20. ^ Lock, Peter (2013). The Routledge Companion to the Crusades. Routledge. p. 123. ISBN 9781135131371.
  21. ^ Lee, Sidney (1897). "Segrave, John de". Dictionary of National Biography. Vol 51. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  22. ^ Malcolm Barber (2006). The Trial of the Templars, p. 22. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-85639-6.
  23. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History, p. 153. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  24. ^ Verbruggen, J. F. (1997). The Art of Warfare in Western Europe During the Middle Ages: From the Eighth Century to 1340, p. 197. Suffolk: Boydell Press. ISBN 0-85115-630-4.
  25. ^ Sadler, John (2005). Border Fury: England and Scotland at War, 1296–1568, p. 86. Harlow: Pearson Education. ISBN 978-0-582-77293-9.
  26. ^ Ambraseys, N. N.; Melville, C. P.; Adams, R. D. (2005). The Seismicity of Egypt, Arabia and the Red Sea: A Historical Review. Cambridge University Press. p. 42. ISBN 9780521020251.
  27. ^ The Oxford companion to Scottish history. Oxford University Press. February 24, 2011. p. 334. ISBN 9780199693054.
  28. ^ Foss, Clive (1979). Ephesus After Antiquity: A Late Antique, Byzantine, and Turkish City. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 144. ISBN 0521220866.
  29. ^ Lock, Peter (2013). The Routledge Companion to the Crusades. Routledge. p. 124. ISBN 9781135131371.
  30. ^ Miller, William (1921). "The Zaccaria of Phocaea and Chios (1275-1329)". Essays on the Latin Orient. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 283–298.
  31. ^ Luttrell, Anthony (1975). "The Hospitallers at Rhodes, 1306–1421". In Hazard, Harry W. (ed.). A History of the Crusades, Volume III: The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. University of Wisconsin Press. pp. 278–313. ISBN 0-299-06670-3.
  32. ^ Favier, Jean (2012). Le Bourgeois de Paris au Moyen Age. Paris: Tallandier. p. 135.
  33. ^ Nirenberg, David (1998). Communities of violence: persecution of minorities in the Middle Ages. Princeton: Princeton University Press. p. 18. ISBN 0-691-05889-X.
  34. ^ Regner, Elisabet (2013). Det medeltida Stockholm. En arkeologisk guidebok [Medieval Stockholm. An archaeological guide book] (in Swedish). Lund: Historiska Media. p. 150. ISBN 978-91-86297-88-6.
  35. ^ Holland, John (1841). The history and description of fossil fuel, the collieries, and coal trade of Great Britain. London: Whittaker and Company. pp. 313–314.
  36. ^ "Edward II of England: Biography on Undiscovered Scotland". www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  37. ^ Bernard Grun, The Timetables of History, Simon & Schuster, 3rd ed, 1991. ISBN 0671749196. p185
  38. ^ Sharpe, Thomasin Elizabeth (1875). A royal descent [of the family of Sharpe]; with other pedigrees and memorials [With] Additions and corrections. pp. 2–.
  39. ^ Steven Mueller (2007). The Wittelsbach Dynasty. Waldmann Press. ISBN 978-0-9702576-3-5.
  40. ^ Koenen, H.J. (1903). "Het ridderlijk geslacht van Heemskerk in de middeleeuwen", pp. 228–244. De Wapenheraut, Archief van Epen, 's Gravenhage - Brussel, vol VII.
  41. ^ Axelrod, Alan (2013). Mercenaries: A Guide to Private Armies and Private Military Companies. CQ Press. p. 174. ISBN 9781483364674.
  42. ^ Anne Rudloff Stanton (2001). The Queen Mary Psalter: A Study of Affect and Audience. American Philosophical Society. pp. 217–. ISBN 978-0-87169-916-9.
  43. ^ Anne Commire (8 October 1999). Women in World History. Gale. ISBN 978-0-7876-4061-3.
  44. ^ Chris Given-Wilson (2010). Fourteenth Century England VI. Boydell & Brewer. p. 27. ISBN 978-1-84383-530-1.
  45. ^ Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd Edition, 2011. Douglas Richardson. p. 3. ISBN 978-1-4610-4520-5.
  46. ^ Sergeĭ Mikhaĭlovich Solovʹev (1976). History of Russia: Russian society, 1389-1425. Academic International Press. ISBN 978-0-87569-228-9.
  47. ^ Kirsten A. Seaver (30 November 2014). The Last Vikings: The Epic Story of the Great Norse Voyagers. I.B.Tauris. p. 124. ISBN 978-1-78453-057-0.
  48. ^ "Book of Nature". World Digital Library. 2013-08-07. Retrieved 2013-08-27.
  49. ^ Paul S. Bruckman (7 June 2011). La Divina Commedia (The Divine Comedy) : Purgatorio: La Divina Commedia (The Divine Comedy) : Purgatorio a Translation into English in Iambic Pentameter, Terza Rima Form. Xlibris Corporation. p. 818. ISBN 978-1-4568-7895-5.
  50. ^ "Joan I | Facts & Biography". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 22 July 2018.
  51. ^ "On this day 1305: William Wallace hanged, drawn and quartered". Scotsman. Retrieved 22 July 2018.
  52. ^ "Edward I and Eleanor of Castile". Westminster Abbey. Retrieved 21 March 2019.