The 1160s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1160, and ended on December 31, 1169.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

1160

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
LevantEdit
  • Autumn – Raynald of Châtillon, prince of Antioch, makes a plundering raid in the valley of the Euphrates at Marash to seize cattle, horses and camels from the local peasants. On his way back to Antioch, he and his retinue are attacked by Zangid warriors. Raynald is unhorsed and captured, and sent to Aleppo where he is put in jail.[6]
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

EducationEdit

1161

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit
EnglandEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1162

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AfricaEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
  • The Beisi Pagoda (or North Temple Pagoda) is completed during the Song Dynasty.

1163

1164

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
LevantEdit
AfricaEdit
  • A commercial treaty grants access to Almohad-dominated ports to merchants from several European powers, including Marseille and Savona.[31]
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

MarketsEdit
  • Venice secures its loans against fiscal revenues, to obtain lower interest rates. In the first operation of this kind, the Republic obtains 1150 silver marci, for 12 years of the taxes levied on the Rialto market.[32]
ReligionEdit

1165

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1166

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
  • Emperor Manuel I (Komnenos) asks Venice to help pay the costs of defending Sicily, whose Norman rulers have had good relations with Venice. Doge Vitale II Michiel refuses to pay the requested subsidy. Manuel begins to cultivate relationships with the main commercial rivals of Venice: Genoa and Pisa. He grants them their own trade quarters in Constantinople, very near to the Venetian settlements.
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
IrelandEdit

1167

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EgyptEdit
  • March 18Battle of Al-Babein: A second Zangid army (some 12,000 men) under General Shirkuh and his nephew Saladin marches towards Egypt, but is met by the combined Crusader-Fatimid forces led by King Amalric of Jerusalem. After skirmishing down the Nile, the Crusaders are defeated near Giza and forced to retreat to Cairo.[38]
  • May–June – Saladin leads the defence of Alexandria against the Crusader-Fatimid forces. He takes command over the garrison (plus some 1,000 cavalry), and the army's sick and wounded.[39]
  • August 4 – Amalric I accepts a peace treaty and enters at the head of the Crusader army Alexandria. Saladin and his troops are escorted out with full military honours, and retreats to Syria.[40]
IrelandEdit
EnglandEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
  • Absalon, Danish archbishop and statesman, leads the first synod at Lund. He is granted land around the city of "Havn" (modern-day Copenhagen) and fortifies the coastal defence against the Wends.

1168

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
EgyptEdit
  • December 22 – Afraid that the Egyptian capital Fustat (modern-day Old Cairo) will be captured by Crusader forces, its Fatimid vizier, Shawar, orders the city set afire. The capital burns for 54 days.
EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1169

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
  • Late Summer – Emperor Manuel I (Komnenos) sends a embassy to Egypt to demand tribute, and threatens the country with war when they refuse to pay it. The Byzantine fleet under Admiral Andronikos Kontostephanos sets out from the Hellespont; 60 war galleys are sent to Palestine. with money for "the knights of Jerusalem". Andronikos with the rest of the fleet sails to Cyprus, at which he defeats a patrolling squadron of 6 Fatimid ships.[47]
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
IrelandEdit
EgyptEdit
  • Spring – A Zangid expedition under General Shirkuh accompanied by his nephew Saladin invades Egypt. King Amalric I of Jerusalem orders his fleet to return to Acre and retreats with the Crusaders back to Palestine.
  • January 8 – Shirkuh enters Cairo, leaving the Zangid army encamped outside the city. He goes to the palace, where the 18-year-old Fatimid caliph Al-Adid welcomes him with ceremonial gifts and promised money.[51]
  • January 18Shawar, Fatimid vizier and de facto ruler, is invited to join Shirkuh on a pilgrimage to the tomb of Al-Shafi'i. Underway he and his escort are taken prisoner, on orders from Al-Adid Shawar is decapitated.[52]
  • March 23 – Shirkuh dies from over-eating after a 2-month reign.[53] He is succeeded by Saladin, who is appointed chief vizier of the Fatimid Caliphate. He takes over as commander of Nur al-Din's forces in Egypt.[54]
  • Summer – Saladin invites his brother Turan-Shah to join him in Cairo. He brings with him his family and retinue but also a substantial army provided by Nur al-Din. Turan-Shah is welcomed by Al-Adid as a friend.[55]
  • August 23 – Saladin crushes a rebellion by Sudanese forces (50,000 men) of the Fatimid army, along with a number of Egyptian emirs and commoners. He never again had to face a military uprising from Cairo.[56]
  • Winter – Saladin supported by reinforcements from Nur al-din, defeats a Crusader-Byzantine force under Amalric I near Damietta. During the 3-month siege, the Crusaders are forced to retreat to Palestine.[57]

By topicEdit

Art and ScienceEdit
  • Eleanor of Aquitaine leaves the English court of Henry II, to establish her own court in Poitiers. It will become known as a center of courtly love. Richard I accompanies his mother and is made heir to Aquitaine.

Significant peopleEdit

Julias|Date expression: June 2

BirthsEdit

1160

1161

1162

1163

1164

1165

1166

1167

1168

1169

DeathsEdit

1160

1161

1162

1163

1164

1165

1166

1167

1168

1169

ReferencesEdit

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