This article concerns the period 119 BC – 110 BC.

Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

EventsEdit

119 BC

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
ChinaEdit
  • Battle of Mobei: Wei Qing crosses Gobi Desert, defeats Yizhixie Chanyu and kills or captures 19,000 Xiongnu.
  • Huo Qubing crosses the eastern Gobi, defeats and executes Bijuqi, defeats the Tuqi (Worthy Prince) of the Left (East), and captures three kings. He reaches as far as Lake Baikal.
  • Failing to reconnoiter with Wei Qing's army, general Li Guang commits suicide after learning that Wei has prepared charges against him.
  • Emperor Wu creates the rank of Grand Marshal and gives it to both Wei Qing and Huo Qubing, thereby making Huo's rank and salary equal to that of Wei.
  • Emperor Wu suspends further campaigning against the Xiongnu due to a shortage of horses.[1][2]
  • Government monopolies are established in iron, salt and liquor.

118 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
NumidiaEdit
ChinaEdit

117 BCEdit

116 BCEdit

By placeEdit

EgyptEdit

115 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
Middle EastEdit

114 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
Asia MinorEdit

113 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
SyriaEdit
NumidiaEdit
ChinaEdit
  • The state of Nanyue, a vassal of the Han Dynasty, agrees to submit to Han laws and receives envoys to oversee the succession of the young king Zhao Xing.[3]

By topicEdit

ArtEdit

112 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
AsiaEdit
  • Lü Jia, Premier of the Han vassal state of Nanyue, opposes increased Han control and refuses to appear before the king of Nanyue and the envoys of Han. He rebels against the Han when Emperor Wu sends an armed force of 2,000 men to kill him and his allies. Lü kills king Zhao Xing and his regent, Queen Dowager Jiu, massacres the Han force, and installs Zhao Jiande as king.[4]
  • Autumn - Emperor Wu launches a major invasion of Nanyue, sending five riverine fleets invade under Lu Bode, Yang Pu and three former Yue generals.[5]
  • The king of Dongyue, Zou Yushan, sends an army to link up with Yang Pu, but he secretly sends an envoy to Zhao Jiande and halts the transport fleet to await the war's outcome, claiming that the weather is preventing its advance.[6]
  • Emperor Wu executes his favourite necromancer Luan Da for fraud.[7]

111 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
ChinaEdit
  • In winter, the Han general Yang Pu captures Xunxia Gorge and Shimen and defeats the Nanyue army. He and Han general Lu Bode then attack the Nanyue capital Panyu and receive its surrender. Nanyue's King Zhao Jiande and Premier Lü Jia are captured in flight and killed.
  • Nanyue's ally Cangwu submits to the Han Dynasty, and Nanyue is divided into nine prefectures. The Han Dynasty thereby extends its control to modern-day North Vietnam.[8]
  • Han-Xiongnu War: The Han generals Gongsun He and Zhao Ponu invade deep into Xiongnu territory, Gongsun marching from Wuhuan and Zhao from Lingju. However, neither come upon a Xiongnu army. There follows a period of several years in which the Han and Xiongnu seek to establish peace.[9][10]
  • Han-Dongyue War
  • Autumn - After learning that Yang Pu had suggested an invasion of Dongyue to Emperor Wu of Han, Dongyue's king, Zou Yushan, declares himself 'Emperor Wu' and sends an army under Zou Li to invade Han territory. They capture Baisha, Wulin and Meiling, and the Han Treasurer Zhang Cheng is executed for avoiding the Dongyue army.
  • Emperor Wu of Han sends two maritime fleets and three armies, including an army under Yang Pu, to invade Dongyue.[11]

110 BCEdit

By placeEdit

Roman RepublicEdit
AsiaEdit
  • In winter, the Han general Yang Pu retakes Wulin, and a faction of Dongyue nobles kill their king Zou Yushan before surrendering to the Han general Han Yue.
  • Emperor Wu of Han annexes Dongyue and Minyue and relocates their population to the area between the Yangtze and Huai rivers.[12]

BirthsEdit

118 BC

117 BC

116 BC

115 BC

114 BC

111 BC

110 BC

DeathsEdit

119 BC

118 BC

117 BC

116 BC

115 BC

114 BC

113 BC

112 BC

111 BC

110 BC

  • Sima Tan, Chinese astrologist and historian

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 164–168. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  2. ^ Qian, Sima. Records of the Grand Historian, Section: Xiongnu, Section: Wei Qing & Huo Qubing.
  3. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. p. 179. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  4. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 179–182. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  5. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. p. 182. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  6. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. p. 186. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  7. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. p. 174. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  8. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 182–183. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  9. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 203–204. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  10. ^ Qian, Sima. Records of the Grand Historian, Section: Wei Qing & Huo Qubing.
  11. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. p. 186. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  12. ^ Hung, Hing Ming (2020). The Magnificent Emperor Wu: China's Han Dynasty. pp. 186–187. ISBN 978-1628944167.
  13. ^ Wolf, Thomas (2019). The Nightingale's Sonata: The Musical Odyssey of Lea Luboshutz. Pegasus Books. p. 440. ISBN 978-1-64313-162-7.