The 10s decade ran from January 1, AD 10, to December 31, AD 19.

Millennium: 1st millennium
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In Europe, the decade saw the end of the Early Imperial campaigns in Germania when Roman forces led by Germanicus defeated Germanic tribes in the Battle of Idistaviso in 16 AD. In the subsequent year, a war broke out between Maroboduus and Arminius. In Africa, Tacfarinas led his own Musulamii tribe and a loose and changing coalition of other Berber tribes in a war against the Romans in North Africa during the rule of the emperor Tiberius (AD 14–37). The Armenian Artaxiad dynasty was overthrown by the Romans. In China, the Red Eyebrows Rebellion erupted against Wang Mang, emperor of the Xin dynasty. In Korea, Daeso, the ruler of the kingdom of Dongbuyeo, led his armies into Goguryeo once again. This time, Muhyul, a prince of Goguryeo, led the armies of Goguryeo in a well-planned ambush and slaughtered all of Daeso's army. Only he and a few of his men escaped home.

Literary works from the 10s include works from the ancient Roman poet Ovid, Tristia and Epistulae ex Ponto, while Nicolaus of Damascus wrote a biography of Emperor Augustus (Bios Kaisaros).

In the Roman Empire, an edict was issued effecting an empire-wide ban on divinatory practices especially astrology. The edict requires any consultation between a customer and a practitioner to be conducted with at least one third party witness present and bans inquiry into anyone's death. A large earthquake caused the destruction of at least twelve cities in the region of Lydia in the Roman province of Asia in Asia Minor.

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  • Germania Inferior and the Rhine are secured by Germanicus.
  • Emperor Augustus abandons his plan to create a defensive border at the Elbe, in order to reinforce the Roman defenses along the Rhine and the Danube.
  • An edict is issued effecting an empire-wide ban on divinatory practices, especially astrology. The edict requires any consultation between a customer and a practitioner to be conducted with at least one third party witness present, and bans inquiry into anyone's death.[1]
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  • Last year (3rd) of Shijianguo era of the Chinese Xin Dynasty.
  • Considered the lucky number of those from the Chinese Xin Dynasty.

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Asia MinorEdit

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SyriaEdit
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  • After a flooding of the Yellow River in China, farmers are forced to rebel. Emperor Wang Mang reacts by sending an army (some 100,000 men) against the agrarian rebels. The rebel leaders, concerned that during battle it will become impossible to tell friend from foe, order that their men color their eyebrows red – and this is where the name Chimei ("The Red Eyebrows") comes from.
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AD 10

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DeathsEdit

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AD 19

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Cramer, F. H. "Astrology in Roman Law and Politics" Memoirs of the American Philosophical Society, 37 (1954).
  2. ^ "LacusCurtius • Res Gestae Divi Augusti (II)". penelope.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-22.
  3. ^ Ronald Syme, History in Ovid (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978), pp. 40-42
  4. ^ "LacusCurtius • Res Gestae Divi Augusti (II)". penelope.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-22.
  5. ^ Tacitus; The Annals 1.31
  6. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 1.49
  7. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 1.51
  8. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 1.20
  9. ^ According to Balduin Saria in 1938; not supported by later archaeological findings. Šašel Kos, Marjeta (September 2012). "2000 let Emone? Kaj bomo praznovali?" [2000 Years of Emona? What Will We Celebrate?] (PDF). Ljubljana: glasilo Mestne občine Ljubljana [Ljubljana: The Bulletin of the City Municipality of Ljubljana] (in Slovenian). XVII (7): 28–29. ISSN 1318-797X. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 20, 2013. Retrieved July 1, 2013.
  10. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 1.57.
  11. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 1.62
  12. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 1.76.
  13. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.21
  14. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.24
  15. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.4
  16. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.41
  17. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.52
  18. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.47
  19. ^ a b "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  20. ^ Varner, Eric R. (2004). Mutilation and transformation: damnatio memoriae and Roman imperial portraiture. Brill. p. 21. ISBN 978-90-04-13577-2.
  21. ^ Wolf, Thomas (2019). The Nightingale's Sonata: The Musical Odyssey of Lea Luboshutz. Pegasus Books. p. 440. ISBN 978-1-64313-162-7.
  22. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 1.53
  23. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.40
  24. ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.42
  25. ^ "On this day in AD 19 Germanicus died at Antioch. - Mint Imperials". Mint Imperials. 10 October 2016. Retrieved 12 January 2018.