1000s (decade)

The 1000s (pronounced “one-thousands”) was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1000, and ended on December 31, 1009.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

1000

JapanEdit

  • Palace Scandal: Princess Consort Yasuko has an affair. Michinaga (her half-brother) investigates it secretly and finds out the truth about her pregnancy. Yasuko cries a lot and repents what she did. Yasuko leaves the palace under the patronage of Empress Dowager Senshi and Michinaga (moved to his residence).[citation needed]
  • Murasaki Shikibu starts to write The Tale of Genji.[citation needed]
  • 10 January: Death of Empress Dowager Masako (empress consort of the late Emperor Reizei)[citation needed]
  • 8 April: Fujiwara no Shoshi is promoted to Empress (Chugu), while there is an other empress, Fujiwara no Teishi (kogo) - this is the first time that there are two empresses[citation needed]

AmericasEdit

ChristendomEdit

 
Europe in 1000

In continental Europe, the Holy Roman Empire established itself as the most powerful state. Otto III made a pilgrimage from Rome to Aachen and Gniezno (Gnesen), stopping at Regensburg, Meissen, Magdeburg, and Gniezno. The Congress of Gniezno (with Bolesław I Chrobry) was part of his pilgrimage. In Rome, he built the basilica of San Bartolomeo all'Isola, to host the relics of St. Bartholomew.

In France, Robert II, the son of Hugh Capet, was the first of the Capetian kings.

The Byzantine Empire under the Macedonian dynasty was engaged in a long and hard war with the First Bulgarian Empire. In the year 1000, the Byzantine generals Theodorokanos and Nikephoros Xiphias captured the former Bulgarian capitals of Pliska and Great Preslav, along with Little Preslav, extending Byzantine control over the northeastern portion of the Bulgarian state (Mysia and Scythia Minor). At the same time, Byzantium was instrumental in the Christianization of the Kievan Rus' and of other medieval Slavic states.

In Great Britain, a unified Kingdom of England had developed out of the various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. In Scandinavia, Christianization was in its early stages, with the Althingi of the Icelandic Commonwealth embracing Christianity in the year 1000.

On September 9, King Olaf Tryggvason was defeated by Denmark and Sweden in the Battle of Svolder. Sweyn I established Danish control over part of Norway. Oslo, Norway, was founded (the exact year is debatable, but the 1,000 year anniversary was held in the year 2000).

The Papacy during this time was in a period of decline, in retrospect known as the saeculum obscurum ("Dark Age") or "pornocracy" ("rule of harlots"), a state of affairs that would result in the Great Schism later in the 11th century.

Hungary was established in 1000 as a Christian state. In the next centuries, the Kingdom of Hungary became the pre-eminent cultural power in the Central European region. On December 25, Stephen I was crowned as the first King of Hungary in Esztergom.

Sancho III of Navarre became King of Aragon and Navarre. The Reconquista was gaining some ground, but the southern Iberian peninsula would still be dominated by Islam for centuries to come; Córdoba at this time was the world's largest city with 450,000 inhabitants.

In the Kingdom of Croatia the army of the Republic of Venice lead by Doge Pietro II Orseolo conquered the island of Lastovo.

It is known that in or around this year, Norse explorer Leif Ericson became the first European to land in the Americas, at L'Anse aux Meadows in modern-day Newfoundland.

Muslim worldEdit

The Islamic world was in its Golden Age; still organised in caliphates, it continued to be dominated by the Abbasid Caliphate, with the Caliphate of Córdoba to the west, and experienced ongoing campaigns in Africa and in India. Persia was in a period of instability, with various polities seceding from Abassid rule, among whom the Ghaznavids would emerge as the most powerful.

The Islamic world was reaching the peak of its historical scientific achievements. Important scholars and scientists who flourished in AD 1000 include Abu al-Qasim (Abulcasis), Ibn Yunus (publishes his astronomical treatise Al-Zij al-Hakimi al-Kabir in Cairo in c. 1000), Abu Sahl al-Quhi (Kuhi), Abu-Mahmud al-Khujandi, Abu Nasr Mansur, Abu al-Wafa, Ahmad ibn Fadlan, Al-Muqaddasi, Ali Ibn Isa, and al-Karaji (al-Karkhi). Ibn al-Haytham (Book of Optics), Avicenna, and Abu Rayhan al-Biruni, who all flourished around the year 1000, are considered to be among the greatest scientists of the Middle Ages altogether.[citation needed]

The Turkic migration by this time had reached Eastern Europe, and most of the Turkic tribes (Khazars, Bulghars, Pechenegs etc.) had been Islamized.

Babylon abandonedEdit

Babylon was abandoned around this year.

1001

By placeEdit

JapanEdit

Sei Shonagon starts the write the Pillow Book.

70th Birthday and Longevity Ceremony of Fujiwara no Bokushi (mother-in-law of Fujiwara no Michinaga, grandmother of Empress Shoshi).

40th Birthday of Empress Dowager Senshi (mother of Emperor Ichijo).

13 January - Empress Teishi dies in childbirth.

November - The imperial palace is destroyed by fire.

AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit
EuropeEdit
North AmericaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1002

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
British IslesEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1003

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ArtEdit
ReligionEdit

1004

By placeEdit

JapanEdit

December: Fujiwara no Kenshi enter the palace as lady-in-waiting to her sister, Empress Shoshi (Kenshi will become empress, too)

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AfricaEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1005

By placeEdit

JapanEdit

- Shui Wakashu is compiled by Retired Emperor Kazan (This is an imperial waka poem anthology)

13 May: The court permits Fujiwara no Korechika to enter the palace

EuropeEdit
British IslesEdit
AsiaEdit

1006

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
OceaniaEdit

By topicEdit

AstronomyEdit

1007

By placeEdit

JapanEdit

1 January: New Year’s Day - Imperial Princess Shushi is granted the title Ippon Shinno (first rank princess)

29 January: Ranking Ceremony of Murasaki Shikibu - as a renowned writer and lady-in-waiting, tutor of Empress Shoshi, she is elevated to high - above her, there is only the empress in the palace

April: Imperial Prince Tomohira receives the title nihon (second rank prince)

EnglandEdit


IrelandEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1008

By placeEdit

JapanEdit

Murasaki Shikibu starts to write her diary (Murasaki Shikibu Nikki)

42nd Birthday of Fujiwara no Michinaga - it is a great celebration because he is the father-in-law of the emperor

17 March: Death of Retired Emperor Kazan

25 May: Death of Imperial Princess Bishi (second daughter of Emperor Ichijo) - after the death of her mother, she was raised by her stepmother, Empress Shoshi but has a weak health

12 October: Empress Shoshi give birth to Prince Atsuhira - this means that the blood of Michinaga will sit on the throne

13 November: Kamo Special Festival - On this occasion, Lady Shikibu is given the name Murasaki from a famous court poet, Fujiwara no Kinto

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • King Æthelred II (the Unready) orders a new fleet of warships built, organised on a national scale. It is a huge undertaking, but is completed the following year.[14]
Arabian EmpireEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1009

By placeEdit

JapanEdit

- Murasaki Shikibu teach Chinese to Empress Shoshi in secret because this language is usually learnt by men.

- Princess Takahime (daughter of Imperial Prince Tomohira, cousin of emperor Ichijo) is married to Fujiwara no Yorimichi, the first son of Fujiwara no Michinaga - this connection with the imperial family enlarge Michinaga’s power

- Takashina no Mitsuko is imprisoned for cursing the empress - they implicate Korechika but later pardon him

21 August: Death of Imperial Prince Tomohira (uncle of the emperor)

14 December: Empress Shoshi give birth to Prince Atsunaga (he is her second prince so it is great joy)

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

Science and technologyEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

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1009

DeathsEdit

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1009

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Khotyn". Antychnyi Kyiv (in Russian). Archived from the original on May 13, 2007. Retrieved 2007-05-28.
  2. ^ Reuter, Timothy (1992). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 259. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  3. ^ a b Boissonade, B. "Les premières croisades françaises en Espagne. Normands, Gascons, Aquitains et Bourguignons (1018-1032)". Bulletin Hispanique. 36 (1): 5–28. doi:10.3406/hispa.1934.2607.
  4. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 197. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  5. ^ Norwich, John Julius (1991). Byzantium: The Apogee, pp. 259-260. ISBN 0-394-53779-3.
  6. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœr du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 47.
  7. ^ Benvenuti, Gino (1985). Le Repubbliche Marinare. Amalfi, Pisa, Genova e Venezia. Rome: Newton & Compton Editori. p. 41. ISBN 88-8289-529-7.
  8. ^ Moody, TW; Martin, FX, eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork, Ireland: The Mercier Press. p. 113.
  9. ^ Palmer, Alan; Palmer, Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 47–48. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  10. ^ "A history of Merapi". Archived from the original on February 8, 2007. Retrieved February 20, 2007.
  11. ^ Murdin, Paul; Murdin, Lesley (1985). Supernovae. Cambridge University Press. pp. 14–16. ISBN 052130038X.
  12. ^ John Haywood (1995). Historical Atlas of the Vikings, p. 118. ISBN 978-0-140-51328-8.
  13. ^ Kingsley Bolton; Christopher Hutton (2000). Triad Societies: Western Accounts of the History, Sociology and Linguistics of Chinese Secret Societies. ISBN 978-0-415-24397-1.
  14. ^ Stenton, F.M. (1971). Anglo-Saxon England, pp. 381–384. The Oxford History of England. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 019-280-1392.
  15. ^ Quoted in Mats G. Larsson, Götarnas riken: Upptäcktsfärder till Sveriges enande. Stockholm: Atlantis, 2002, p. 185.
  16. ^ According to the "Annals of Magdeburg" (c. 1170) and some other sources.
  17. ^ In the Annals of Quedlinburg, Saxony-Anhalt.
  18. ^ Norwich, John Julius. The Normans in the South 1016–1130. Longmans; London, 1967.
  19. ^ Norwich, John Julius (1982). A History of Venice. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.
  20. ^ Peter Sawyer. The Oxford Illustrated History of the Vikings. London: Oxford University Press. p. 75. ISBN 978-0-19-285434-6.
  21. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  22. ^ Sutton, Ian (1999). Architecture, from Ancient Greece to the Present. London: Thames & Hudson. ISBN 978-0-500-20316-3.
  23. ^ "King Kenneth III: Biography on Undiscovered Scotland". www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk. Retrieved 2 December 2021.