10,000 (ten thousand) is the natural number following 9,999 and preceding 10,001.

← 9999 10000 10001 →
Cardinalten thousand
Ordinal10000th
(ten thousandth)
Numeral systemdecamillesimal
Factorization24 × 54
Divisors25 total
Greek numeral
Roman numeralX
Unicode symbol(s)X, ↂ
Greek prefixmyria-
Latin prefixdecamilli-
Binary100111000100002
Ternary1112011013
Octal234208
Duodecimal595412
Hexadecimal271016
Chinese numeral万, 萬

NameEdit

Many languages have a specific word for this number: in Ancient Greek it is μύριοι (the etymological root of the word myriad in English), in Aramaic ܪܒܘܬܐ, in Hebrew רבבה [revava], in Chinese 萬/万 (Mandarin wàn, Cantonese maan6, Hokkien bān), in Japanese 万/萬 [man], in Khmer ម៉ឺន [meun], in Korean 만/萬 [man], in Russian тьма [t'ma], in Vietnamese vạn, in Thai หมื่น [meun], in Malayalam പതിനായിരം [patinayiram], and in Malagasy alina.[1] In many of these languages, it often denotes a very large but indefinite number.[2]

The Greek root was used in early versions of the metric system in the form of the decimal prefix myria-.

The number 10000 can also be written 10,000 (UK and US), 10.000 (Europe mainland), 10 000 (transition metric), or 10•000 (with the dot raised to the middle of the zeroes; metric).

In mathematicsEdit

In scienceEdit

In timeEdit

In ArtsEdit

In other fieldsEdit

  • In currency,
  • In distances,
  • In finance, on March 29, 1999, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed at 10006.78 which was the first time the index closed above the 10,000 mark.
  • In futurology, Stewart Brand in Visions of the Future: The 10,000-Year Library proposes a museum built around a 10,000 year clock as an idea for assuring that vital information survives future crashes of civilizations. [7]
  • In games,
    • Ten Thousand is one name of a dice game that is also called farkle.
  • In game shows, The $10,000 Pyramid ran on television from 1973 to 1974
  • In history,
    • Army of 10,000 Sixty Day Troops, 1862–1863. American Civil War [8]
    • The Army of the Ten Thousand were a group of Ancient Greek mercenaries who marched against Artaxerxes II of Persia.
    • The Goddess[who?] can appear as the Lady of the Ten Thousand Names, as did Isis who was called Isis of Ten Thousand Names
    • the Persian Immortals were also called the Ten Thousand or 10,000 Immortals, so named because their number of 10,000 was immediately re-established after every loss.
    • The 10,000 Day War: Vietnam by Michael Maclear ISBN 0-312-79094-5 also alternate titles The ten thousand day war: Vietnam, 1945–1975 (10,000 days is 27.4 years)
    • Tomb of Ten Thousand Soldiers – defeat of the Tang dynasty army of China in the Nanzhao kingdom in 751
    • In Islamic history, 10,000 is the number of besieging forces led by Muhammad's adversary, Abu Sufyan, during the Battle of the Trench
    • 10,000 is the number of Muhammad's soldiers during the conquest of Mecca
  • In language,
  • In literature,
  • In philosophy, Lao Zi writes about ten thousand things in the Tao Te Ching In Taoism, the "10,000 Things" is a term meaning all of phenomenal reality. [10]
  • In piphilology, ten thousand is the current world record for the number of digits of pi memorized by a human being.
  • In psychology, Ten Thousand Dreams Interpreted, or what's in a dream: a scientific and practical, by Miller, Gustavus Hindman (1857–1929). Project Gutenberg[9]
  • In religion,
  • In software,
    • the Year 10,000 problem is the collective name for all potential software bugs that will emerge as the need to express years with five digits arises.
  • In sports,

Selected numbers in the range 10001-19999Edit

10001 to 10999Edit

11000 to 11999Edit

  • 11025 – sum of the cubes of the first 14 positive integers. 1052
  • 11083 – palindromic prime in 2 consecutive bases: 23 (KLK23) and 24 (J5J24)
  • 11111 – repdigit
  • 11311 – palindromic prime
  • 11340 – Harshad number in bases 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15 and 16
  • 11377 – Smarandache reverse power summation number
  • 11353star prime[16]
  • 11368 – pentagonal pyramidal number[12]
  • 11410weird number[19]
  • 11411 – palindromic prime in base 10
  • 11424 – Harshad number in bases 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15 and 16
  • 11440 – square pyramidal number[17]
  • 11480 – tetrahedral number[22]
  • 11605 – smallest integer to start a run of five consecutive integers with the same number of divisors
  • 11690 – weird number[19]
  • 11719 – cuban prime,[15] twin prime with 11717
  • 11726 – octahedral number[18]
  • 11826 – smallest number whose square (algebra) is pandigital but lacks zeros.
  • 11953 – palindromic prime in bases 7 (465647) and 30 (D8D30)

12000 to 12999Edit

13000 to 13999Edit

14000 to 14999Edit

  • 14190 – tetrahedral number[22]
  • 14200 – number of n-Queens Problem solutions for n – 12
  • 14341 – palindromic prime
  • 14400 – sum of the cubes of the first 15 positive integers
  • 14641 – 114, palindromic square (base 10)
  • 14644 – octahedral number[18]
  • 14701Markov number[26]
  • 14741 – palindromic prime
  • 14770weird number[19]
  • 14595 – amicable number with 12285
  • 14884 – 1222, palindromic square in base 11
  • 14910 – square pyramidal number[17]

15000 to 15999Edit

16000 to 16999Edit

17000 to 17999Edit

  • 17163 – the largest number that is not the sum of the squares of distinct primes
  • 17272 – weird number[19]
  • 17296 – amicable number with 18416[42]
  • 17321 – 2000th prime number
  • 17344Kaprekar number[43]
  • 17471 – palindromic prime
  • 17570 – weird number[19]
  • 17575 – square pyramidal number[17]
  • 17576 – 263, palindromic in base 5
  • 17689 – 1332, palindromic in base 11
  • 17711 – Fibonacci number[25]
  • 17971 – palindromic prime
  • 17990weird number[19]
  • 17991 – Padovan number[14]

18000 to 18999Edit

  • 18010 – octahedral number[18]
  • 18181 – palindromic prime, strobogrammatic prime[36]
  • 18410 – weird number[19]
  • 18416 – amicable number with 17296[44]
  • 18481 – palindromic prime
  • 18496 – sum of the cubes of the first 16 positive integers
  • 18600harmonic divisor number[45]
  • 18620 – harmonic divisor number[45]
  • 18785 – Leyland number[38]
  • 18830 – weird number[19]
  • 18970 – weird number[19]

19000 to 19999Edit

  • 19019 – square pyramidal number[17]
  • 19390 – weird number[19]
  • 19391 – palindromic prime
  • 19441 – cuban prime[15]
  • 19455 – smallest integer that cannot be expressed as a sum of fewer than 548 ninth powers
  • 19513 – tribonacci number[21]
  • 19531repunit prime in base 5
  • 19600 – 1402, tetrahedral number
  • 19609 – first prime followed by a prime gap of over fifty[35]
  • 19670weird number[19]
  • 19683 – 39
  • 19871 – octahedral number[18]
  • 19891 – palindromic prime
  • 19927 – cuban prime[15]
  • 19991 – palindromic prime

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ On the basis that it did not then (November 2011) appear in Sloane's On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://malagasyword.org/bins/teny2/alina
  2. ^ http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/myriad (Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary)
  3. ^ Climate Timeline Information Tool
  4. ^ http://www.infoworld.com/article/04/07/28/HNnasalinux_1.html news
  5. ^ "NASA Project: Columbia". Archived from the original on 2005-04-08. Retrieved 2005-02-15.
  6. ^ Brewster, David (1830). The Edinburgh Encyclopædia. 12. Edinburgh, UK: William Blackwood, John Waugh, John Murray, Baldwin & Cradock, J. M. Richardson. p. 494. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  7. ^ Brewster, David (1832). The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia. 12 (1st American ed.). Joseph and Edward Parker. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  8. ^ Dingler, Johann Gottfried (1823). Polytechnisches Journal (in German). 11. Stuttgart, Germany: J.W. Gotta'schen Buchhandlung. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  9. ^ https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/926 : Ten Thousand Dreams Interpreted
  10. ^ a b "Sloane's A002182: Highly composite numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  11. ^ "Sloane's A273987: Smallest Riesel number to base n". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2021-01-30.
  12. ^ a b c d e "Sloane's A002411: Pentagonal pyramidal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  13. ^ "Sloane's A003261: Woodall numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  14. ^ a b c "Sloane's A000931: Padovan sequence". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-11.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h "Sloane's A002407: Cuban primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  16. ^ a b c "Sloane's A083577: Prime star numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h "Sloane's A000330: Square pyramidal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g "Sloane's A005900: Octahedral numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab "Sloane's A006037: Weird numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  20. ^ a b "Sloane's A002997: Carmichael numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  21. ^ a b "Sloane's A000073: Tribonacci numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  22. ^ a b c d e f "Sloane's A000292: Tetrahedral numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  23. ^ "Sloane's A000078: Tetranacci numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  24. ^ "Sloane's A001190: Wedderburn-Etherington numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  25. ^ a b "Sloane's A000045: Fibonacci numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  26. ^ a b "Sloane's A002559: Markoff (or Markov) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  27. ^ Revelation 7:4–8
  28. ^ "Sloane's A000682: Semimeanders". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  29. ^ Host: Stephen Fry; Panellists: Alan Davies, Al Murray, Dara Ó Briain and Sandi Toksvig (11 November 2011). "Inland Revenue". QI. Series I. Episode 10. London, England. 19:55 minutes in. BBC. BBC Two.
  30. ^ "Sloane's A000129: Pell numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  31. ^ "Sloane's A112643: Odd and squarefree abundant numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  32. ^ "Sloane's A051015: Zeisel numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  33. ^ "Sloane's A001006: Motzkin numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  34. ^ "Sloane's A007530: Prime quadruples: numbers k such that k, k+2, k+6, k+8 are all prime". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2021-01-30.
  35. ^ a b "Table of Known Maximal Gaps". Prime Pages.
  36. ^ a b "Sloane's A007597: Strobogrammatic primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  37. ^ "Sloane's A091516: Primes of the form 4^n - 2^(n+1) - 1". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  38. ^ a b "Sloane's A076980: Leyland numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  39. ^ "Sloane's A093069: a(n) = (2^n + 1)^2 - 2". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  40. ^ "Sloane's A000108: Catalan numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  41. ^ "Sloane's A088164: Wolstenholme primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  42. ^ Higgins, Peter (2008). Number Story: From Counting to Cryptography. New York: Copernicus. p. 61. ISBN 978-1-84800-000-1.
  43. ^ "Sloane's A006886: Kaprekar numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.
  44. ^ Higgins, ibid.
  45. ^ a b "Sloane's A001599: Harmonic or Ore numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-15.

External linksEdit